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February 01, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

tain Prepares New Policies

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Gaitskell Death Leaves Void

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Acts To Save

tawa, Washington Row
iCanada Atomic Arm

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NUCLEAR WEAPONS-Canadian Prime Minister John Diefen-
baker (left) protested United States insistence on nuclear weapons
for Canadian forces. Liberal leader Lester B. Pearson seconded
Diefenbaker's complaint, but accused the government of vacillat-
ing.
National Roundup

Registration
Completed
ByMeredith
OXFORD (P)-The University of
Mississippi registered James H.
Meredith for his second semester
yesterday, and turned away an-
other Negro attempting to enroll.
The university said the second
Negro, Dewey Roosevelt Greene,
failed to meet qualifications. Uni-
versity officials didn't elaborate.
Greene left the campus, refus-
ing to answer newsmen's ques-
tions about his next possible step.
Routine Registration
Meredith went through the
drawn-out routine of registration
almost the same as any other
student-standing in lines, filling
out cards, conferring with faculty
advisors. From beginning to end, it
took almost four hours.
Greene, a 22-year-old Negro
from Greenwood, Miss., seeking to
transfer credits from the Missis-
sippi Vocational School for .Ne-
groes, appeared on the campus
shortly before noon.
Reject Applications
Ellis told newsmen he turned
down Greene on grounds he is
unqualified for admission-the
same grounds the university cited
in letters last November and De-
cember rejecting his written ap-
plication.
Meanwhile, Negro Harvey Gantt,
the first of his race in South
Carolina's Clemson College, com-
pleted registration peacefully and
is preparing for a normal student
career. Pleas of order by state
officials marked his transfer from
Iowa State University .in marked
contrast to Mississippi's defiant
attitude on Meredith.

World Role
Without EEC
LONDON ()) - Britain acted
swiftly yesterday to strengthen its
world role and position in the At-
lantic Alliance despite a galling
defeat last week on the battle-
grounds of the Common Market.
A day of intensive diplomatic
and political activity brought these
developments:
1) The government offered to
assign its nuclear strike force of
180 H-bombers to NATO on condi-
tion the planes remain under Brit-
ish command and be available for
Britain's use in a national emer-
gency;
2) Prime Minister Harold Mac-
millan sent messages to fellow
Commonwealth prime ministers,
explaining the British position on
meeting the rising trade challenges
of the Common Market now that
France has blocked Britain's mem-
bership;
3) Senior ministers scheduled a
meeting today with President John
F. Kennedy's special trade adviser,:
Christian A. Herter, to request
some of the benefits of the United
States Trade Expansion Act;
4) Premier Otto Krag promised
Macmillan that Denmark will not
desert its six fellow-members of
the European Free Trade Asso-
ciation by seeking solitary admis-
sion into the Common Market, and
5) Macmillan prepared to fly
today to meet Italian Premier Am-
intore Fanfani. Accompanied by
his chief Common Market nego-
tiator, Edward Heath, he will dis-
cuss with Fanfani possible new
moves in the interallied struggle
for European mastery.
It was evident from the reaction
of the press and politicians that
a mood of grim resolution was de-
scending over the nation to meet
and beat the perilous implications
of the retreat from Brussels.

By MALINDA BERRY
The recent death of Labor party
leader Hugh Gaitskell poses an-
other serious challenge for Britain
at a time of crisis and turmoil.
Gaitskell seemed destined to be-
come prime minister within 18
months. The recent crises pointed
to a return to the Labor govern-
ment at this time of drastic na-
tional reconstruction, as it turn-
ed to the Labor party in 1945 im-
mediately following World War II.
Common Market negotiations
failure, the lagging economy, un-
employment and defense shocks
have resulted in sinking public
confidence in the Conservative
government.
Gaitskell Led
But the biggest inducement to
a Labor victory by 1964 was the
leadership of Gaitskell. He has
subdued all the dissident elements
in the party and molded it into a

confidence Instilling, cohesive gov-
ernment. He changed the image
of the Labor party from doctrine
socialism to one acceptable to
many traditional anti-socialists.
Even if the Labor party had not
won the next general election, his
continued guidance of the "Loyal
Opposition" would have been in-
valuable to Britain.
Find New Leader
The problem of the Labor party
now is to find a suitable leader, if
it is to capitalize upon the current
crises and use Gatiskell's effective
party organization to form the.
next government.
The Labor Party started the
general selection process yester-
day by announcing that right-
wingers George Brown and James
Callaghan and left-winger Harold
Wilson are the candidates for the
top post to be chosen by Labor
members of parliament.

B'nai B'rith H L LE L Foundation
TONIGHT, Feb. 1, 7:30 WELCOME SABBATH SERVICE
Speaker: Miss Ruth Routtenberg, "The Hebrew University
followed by ONEG SHABBAT

SATURDAY, Feb. 2, 9 A.M. Sabbath Service

MONDAY, Feb. 4, 7:30 P.M. ASSEMBLY MASS MEETING
Reorganization of Jewish Student Body on campus.
All students are eligible

It is possible that the Conser
tives will attempt to make pot
cal hay from the conflicts of
Laborite right and left wings. T
need this dispute to disenchant
British electorate, unlikely to s
port a party which has beenL
able to solve its own feuds.
However, with the French
jection of Britain's bid to join
European Common Market,
Conservatives have suffered
dramatic blow. Gaitskell
warned Macmillan against
Common Market venture and st
opposed to it. Had he lived
personal prestige would have ne
been higher.
In spite of this, Gaitske
death could also bring a gene
election nearer. Macmillan is a
to pick his own moment, any t
before October, 1964 to call
election. The longer he waits
better the chance the Labor
will have to 'consolidate.

TUESDAY, Feb. 5:

BET MIDRASH and KOSHER DINNERS resume

REGISTRATION FOR CLASSES NOW:
Starting Feb. 11, Hebrew I, If, Mon. and Wed. 7-9 P.M.
Starting Feb. 12, "Great Ages and Ideas of the Jewish
People, Tuesdays at 8 P.M.
Fees: Members: $1.50, others $2
SUNDAY, Feb. 10, 6 P.M., The "New" SUNDAY SUPPER CLUB
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL Campaign begins Monday, Feb. 18

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennediy shifted from compul-
sory to voluntary controls in his
approach to farm surplus prob-
lems yesterday in a special farm
message. He dropped his previous
insistence on rigid production
controls and proposed a system of
voluntary measures instead.
* * *
WASHINGTON-Sen. Kenneth
B. Keating (R-NY) told the Sen-
ate yesterday Russia is pressing a
new military buildup in Cuba. The
Defense Department denied the
validity of his statements.
* * *
WASHINGTON-The Labor De-
partment reported yesterday a
January rise in unemployment
and a drop in employment. The
changes lifted the seasonally ad-
justed unemployment rate from
5.6 to 4.8 per cent. The shifts were
described as seasonally expectable
and statistically insignificant.
WASHINGTON - The Senate
voted 53 to 42 to table and there-
by kill an unprecedented move to
establish that a majority of the

Senate has a constitutional right
to shut off debate and force a
vote on proposed changes in rules
at the start of a new Congress.
WASHINGTON - Republican
James D. Martin, who came with-
in 7,000 votes of defeating the vet-
eran Sen. Lister Hill (D-Ala) last
November, is asking the Senate to
recount the votes. Martin filed an
affidavit charging that some bal-
lots in the election were improp-
erly discarded.
* * *
SAN RAFAEL, Calif.-Republi-
can Don Clausen easily won a spe-
cial election in California's First
Congressional District recently
after losing the November election
to Rep. Clem Miller, who died be-
fore his name could be removed
from the ballot.
* * *
NEW YORK-In a brisk rally
Thursday, t h e stock market
erased a good part of the losses
taken in the previous session. In
the Dow-Jones averages, 30 in-
dustrials were up 4.27, 20 railroads
were up .20, 15 utilities were up
.31, and 65 stocks were up 1.04.

For details of other programs and membership
affiliation, apply to Hillel Office, 1429 Hill St.

y
........ _. . ... .:.. .L .. ..

COMEi1

rU

C R- ikCi-I

This semester
SAVE 20%
on textbooks
12 to 5 P.M.
Basement of S.A.B.
STUDENT BOOK
EXCHANGE

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WAIMJ

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM

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ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.,
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00..
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8:C J.Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sundoy School (for children 2 to
6 years of age. )
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
John G. Malcin, Minister
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Proyer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer ard commentary.
TUESDAY-,
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.

WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy

rr

ISABE13 A*T H,

Communion.

FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Postor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:15: Worship ser-
vices with sermon by Pastor-"Mercy That
Is All-Inclusive."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran.
Students, Supper-Program. Review of Chad
Walsh's "From Utopia to Nightmare" by
Dr. Wallace Pretzer of the English Deport-
ment.
Monday at 8:00 p.m.: First meeting of the
course in Christian Doctrine and Practice.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.: Midweek Devotion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill.St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate1
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship Service and Communion.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
11:00 a.m. Worship Service.
7:00 p.m. Meet for Toboggan Party.
Wednesday-7:15-7:45 p.m. Vespers.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - Morning Wrship.
"Human Nature Abhors a Vacuum," ser-
mon by Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOWA (1290
AM, 102.9 FM) at 11:15a.m.-12:15 p.m.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar, Pine Room, "Christian-
ity and Communism."
7:00 p.m.-Welcome dinner for students and
installation of officers for 1963. Director
of the Ann Arbor Community Center will
speak.
WEDNESDAY
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion in Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m.-Church School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:45 p.m.-American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship.
MONDAY
12:00 noon-Lunch and Discussion.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest K laudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
CONGREGAtIONAL CHURCH
State and William

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Washtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon for Sunday, February 3, will be
"The Age of Rebellion."
Mr. Gnede will he hak in the nulnit.

9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "Youth
grim Fellowship in charge.
10:20 a.m. Bible Lecture.
CHURCH SCHOOL, 9:30 and
crib-9th grade.
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, telep

Sunday," Pil-
11:00 a.m.,

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Avenue

phone 2.

U - U WJU CU .1 -' U - CU U WI ..'...D'U i * mW U U ~ V I II

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