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April 23, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

mood Appointed Sports Editor

SWIM EVENTS HELD:
U.S. Breaks Records in Pan-Am Games

Dave Good, '64, was named
Sports Editor last night by the
Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications to replace Tom Webber,
'63.
Appointed Associate Sports Edi-
tors were Jim Berger and Mike,
Block. Bob Zwinck was appoint-
ed as a Contributing Sports Edi-
tor. The two Associate Sports Edi-
tors replace Jan Winkelman, '63.
Berger is to be in, charge of
assignments while Block's respon-
sibility will be personnel. Zwinck's
special job will be to organize
the Daily football supplement in
the fall.
Immediate Start
The new appointments are ef-
fective at the start of next se-
mester. However, according to tra-
dition, the new staff will begin
operation immediately.
Good is an honors student and
is majoring in journalism. He is
a member of Sphinx junior honor-
ary and a 1960 graduate of Dear-
born High School.
Future Plans
"I think we'll have a big and
well-trained staff next year," said
the new sports editor. "I'm hoping
we'll be able to do a lot in the
way of special feature series."
Good also said, "We plan to in-
crease our intra-mural coverage
as well as follow up the athletic
careers of Michigan graduates bet-
ter. Generally, we will try to in-
crease the coverage of Michigan
sports in proportion to profession-
al sports. In this connection, we
hope to cover out-of-town events
more thoroughly than in the past."
Berger Experienced
Berger is a journalism major
from Hull, Mass. He is a member
of Phi Epsilon Pi social frater-
nity.

For the past two summers he
has worked as a night editor for
the Patriot-Ledger in Quincy,
Mass.
"I hope to keep the staff to-
gether and continue the superb
coverage of Michigan sports,"
said Berger. "I'm in favor of the
football supplement 100 per cent
and hope to make next year's sup-
plement better than this year's."
Largest Staff
Block is also an honors student.
He is a chemistry major and holds
a Gomberg scholarship in chemis-
try. The Skokie, Ill., student is a
member of Phi Lambda Upsilon
honorary chemical fraternity.
"We'll have the largest staff
ever next year," Block said. "With
experience it could also be the
best."
Moore Chosen
Jeff Moore, a junior from
Evanston, Illinois, was chosen
captain of the 1963-64 varsity
swimming team. Moore's spe-
cialty is the 200-yd. butterfly
event. Coach Gus Stager said,
"Jeff has always been a leader.
The team has shown great wis-
dom in its choice."
Zwinck is a math major from
Ann Arbor. He is active in intra-
mural sports, having participated
in 14 of the 15 I-M sports for in-
dependents this past season.
Zwinck is also the tailback on
the Daily football team which suf-
fered a close loss at the hands of
the Michigan Union last fall.
"We're not losing a single man for
next season," said Zwinck. "We're
going to switch from our three-
platoon to a two-platoon team next
season and we're only going to use
one platoon."
Departing Sports Editor Tom
Webber had this parting comment:
"This will be a good staff but
they'll have to work on their golf
scores." Webber estimated the low-
est total 18-hole score for the
four juniors to be 486.

SAU PAULO, Brazil (2') - The
United States continued its rec-
ord-breaking spree in swimming
last night, but suffered another
stunning setback when its top
tennis hope, Frank Froehling, fell
before an obscure Mexican in the
Pan American Games.
Three more Americans, all
teen-agers, broke records in quali-
fying heats of the swimming com-
petition, bringing to five the num-
ber of games records U.S. swim-
mers have broken in two days.
Terri Lee Stickles, 16, Santa
Clara, Calif., set a record of one
minute, 3.3 seconds in the women's
l00-meter freestyle, Carl Robie,
17, Philadelphia, won the men's
2:14.5 and Don Schollander, 17,
200-meterbutterfly in a record
Santa Clara set a record of 4:29.4
in the 400-meters.
The baseball team, clobbered
13-1 by Cuba Sunday, bounded
back with a 5-3victory over Mex-
ico, and a Yankee cyclist, Jack
Rossi gained the semifinals but
nothing could assuage the disap-
pointment over Froehling's set-
back.
Favorite Falls
The 6-foot-4 collegian from San
Antonio, Tex., No. 2-ranked in the
United States and a strong Davis
Cup prospect, fell before unknown
Jaun Arrendondo in straight sets
6-3, 8-6, 6-2.
Froehling had been made the
heavy advance favorite for the
men's championship, although
seeded second behind Mexico's
aging Mario Llamas.
His teammate, Allen Fox of Los
Angeles, kept U.S. hopes alive with
a first round victory over Vincente
Zarazua of Mexico 6-4, 6-4, 6-0.
Sluggers Improve
The baseball team, which put up
a sad show against the Cubans,
looked much better in the game
with Mexico.
Bobby Jenkins, a fireball pitch-
er from Springfield, Mo., limited
the Mexicans to six hits while the

U.S. boys hammered out nine hits
against three Mexican pitchers. 1
Jenkins' battery mate, Charliet
Roys of Springfield, Mass., led the
batting attack. He knocked in two
of the runs with a double and a
single. The Yanks collected threet
runs in the second and two in thet
sixth on the hitting of secondf
baseman Dick Mooney of Weiser,t
Idaho, and shortstop Al DiJardin
of Forest Hills, N.Y.-
Diamond-men,
Set 'To Face
W. Michigan
By TOM WEINBERG '
Either Jim Bobel or Clyde Barn-F
hart will try to spur a comeback
-of a thus far disappointingj
pitching staff this afternoon as
the Michigan baseball team plays
host to Western Michigan.a
"With the obvious exception of
(Fritz) Fisher, our pitching has
been disappointing," Coach Moby
Benedict said in preview to this
afternoon's contest. "The boys that
we've been counting on to come
through for us have shown prac-
tically nothing so far," he said.
This can easily be demonstrated
with a quick glance at the records.
The pitching staff, without the re-
spectable record of Fisher, weakly
supports a 4.95 earned run aver-
age through the spring exhibition
schedule and the three regular
season games.
'Hands Full'
Bobel, a junior and winner of
four games last year, would be
gunning for his second win against
three losses. Left-handed sopho-
more Barnhart would be making
his fifth appearance with his only
decision being last week's win
over Eastern Michigan, by virtue
of his own home run.
"Regardless of who pitches, we'll
'have our hands full," Benedict
remarked. "They always have a
rough team." Benedict perhaps
was recalling the NCAA District
Tournament in which the Wolver-
ines had more trouble than they
had anywhere along the way to the
national championship. Western
won the first of three ten-inning
affairs, only to be ousted with
two consecutive Michigan wins.
Gatza:Gone
Western Michigan has nine wins
in ten games and is fresh from a
double drubbing of Ohio Univer-
sity on Saturday. The outstanding
record is even more impressive
than it appears, since the Broncos
are without the benefit of their
leading hitter, centerfielder Larry
Gatza, who suffered a leg injury
and is out for the season. Gatza,
a senior, led the team in hits,
runs, doubles, tied for the lead in
home runs and hit .350 over the
1962 season.
Tate, Rolls On

The victory kept the U.S. base-
ball team alive in the round robin
tournament and made possible a
second meeting between the
United States and Cuba May 3.
Froehling, seeded second in the
tennis tournament, appeared le-
thargic after his long plane ride
from San Antonio, where he at-
tends Trinity University.
However, the lanky American
had no apologies.
"I wasn't tired," he said after-
ward. "I met an opponent who
came to play, and I couldn't gett
my game going."
Court Troubles
The soft red clay court seemed
to take some of the sting out of
Froehling's big service, rated one
of the hardest in tennis, and his
powerful ground game.
In the second set, Froehling
asked officials to measure the net.
They did and found it too high,
and adjusted it, but this didn't
keep the dark horse Arrendondo
from moving on to victory.
Arrendondo is 28, a mustachioed
player from San Luis Potasi, who
wasn't good enough to make the
Mexican Davis Cup team. The

Mexicans beat the United States
in the American Zone final and
went on to challenge Austrialia for
the Davis Cup, losing in the finals.
Playing Off
The U.S.A. captain and coach,
Robert Kelleher of Los Angeles,
said Froehling's game was way
off-his two strong suits-serve
and forehand-just did not come
off."
New Coac...
EVANSTON (MP-Larry Glass,
28, assistant basketball coach
at Northwestern University, was
appointed head coach last
night.
Glass succeeds Bill Rohr who
resigned to become athletic
director at Ohio University.
Kelleher, also non-playing cap-
tain of the U.S. Davis Cup team,
obviously was disappointed in
Froehling's flop which could alter
Davis Cup strategy this year.
"I suppose Frank feels as badly
as I do, so there is no point right
now of reading any riot act to
him," said Kelleher.

II

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Baltimore
Chicago
New York
Boston
Kansas City
Detroit
Los Angeles
Cleveland
Washington
Minnesota

w
7
6
6
6
7
6
5
4
4
4

L
4
4
4
5
6
7
s
6
8

Pct.
.636
.600
.600
.545
.583
.500
.417
.400
.400
.333

GB
11z
2%
2
2%
3

x-San Francisco
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
x-Milwaukee
x-Los Angeles
Philadelphia
Chicago
x-Cincinnati
New York
Houston

w
8
7
8
7
7
7
6
4
4
4

L
4
4
5
6
6
6
7
5
9
10

Pet.
.666
.636
.615
.538
.538
.538
.462
.444
.307
.308

GB
1
11z
2
22
4
4Y2

JillI

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 6, Detroit 5
Chicago at Cleveland (ppd.)
Washington 4, Los Angeles 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Kansas City
Los Angeles at Washington
Minnesota at Baltimore (n)
Boston at New York
Only gamnes scheduled

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 8, New York 6
St. Louis 5, Houston 2
Milwaukee at Los Angeles (inc)
Pittsburgh 2, Chicago 0
Cincinnati at San Francisco (inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Pittsburgh
St. Louis at Houston
Milwaukee at Los Angeles (n)
Cincinnati at San Francisco
Only games scheduled

HAVE FUN!
"WAY OUT WEST,"
Spring Weekend-April 26-27
Sam's Store has Levi's galore
for "Guys and Gals".. .

i

ASSOCIATES-Mike Block and Jim Berger were named Associate Sports Editors and Bob Zwinck was
named Contributing Sports Editor for the coming year. Block will be in charge of personnel and
Berger's duty will be to give assignments. Zwinck will be in charge of a Fall Football Supplement
and will write columns throughout the year.

T\
FOR ALL YOUR FORMAL NEEDS!
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TUEXDO RENTAL SERVICE
1230 Packard NO 5-4549

:Tennis Team Whips Purdue

i
.j
.y

I

By MIKE BLOCK
Acting Associate Sports Editor
Michigan's tennis team defeated
both Purdue and the 40-degree
weather yesterday at the Varsity
Courts, as it swept to its third
straight Big Ten dual meet vic-
tory.
The final score was Michigan
6, Purdue 2, with the ninth match,
the second doubles, being called
on account of cold weather. The
most outstanding facet of the vic-
tory was that every Wolverine
player but one, senior Ray Sen-
kowski, was a sophomore.
Two of them, George Russell
and Wally Zelman participated in
their first intercollegiate competi-
tion, and both were involved in
the two matches dropped by the
Wolverines. Russell, playing sixth
singles, won the first set from
George Schoene, 6-1, but slipped
6-4 and 6-2 in the final two.
Zelman and Bo Barker lost 6-4,
6-4 in third doubles.
Hot Play
The hottest match on a wintry
day occurred in second singles be-
tween Wolverine John Fraser and

Purdue's Ross Helft. Fraser began
slowly in the first set, but picked
up momentum and took a 6-2 vic-
tory. He was ahead 4-3 in the
second, but then ran into the wall,
and was shaken up enough to fall
behind 5-4.
In the 10th game, Fraser fell
behind Helft, but managed to pull
into a deuce game. Thereupon,
seven deuce games ensued, with
the advantage being traded back
and forth, until Fraser finally pre-
vailed. He then copped the next
two contests to take the set and
match.
Easy Triumphs
Senkowski had little trouble with
Bob Powless, winning twice by
identical 6-1 counts. Brian Flood
and Barker, playing third and
fifth singles, respectively, likewise
had easy triumphs, by 6-3, 6-2 and
6-1, 6-3.
In fourth singles, Hal Lowe lost
to Mike Hannas, 6-3 in the initial
battle, but came back to vanquish
him, 6-4 and 6-3.
Win Doubles

stepped out in front 4-1 in the
first set and picked up two more
after the Boilermaker pair came
back to win three straight games.
The top "M" doubles pair broke
from behind an opening 2-1 defi-
cit in the second stanza for the
clincher.
Down 3-0 after losing the first
set, 6-4, in third doubles, Barker
and Zelman rallied to pull within
5-4 before falling victims to the
deciding Purdue game.
Freeze-Out
Lowe and Flood dropped their
first set to Helft and Hannas, 6-3,
and then roared back to a 9-7 win
in the second but by then the
players, spectators and sport re-
porters had so frozen out that
the match was cancelled.

I

9'Q GQ Pc~

Senkowski and Fraser banged
away a 6-4, 6-4 win over Purdue's
Powless-Keith Butterfield duo in
the first doubles. The Wolverines
Five Sophs!
SINGLES: 1. Senkowski (M) def.
Powless, 6-1, 6-0. 2. Fraser (M) def.
Helft, 6-2, 7-5. 3. Flood (M) def. But-
terfield, 6-3, 6-2. 4. Lowe (M) def,
Hannas, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. 5. Barker (M)
def. Kalabanx, 6-1, 6-3. 6. Schoene
(P) def. Russell, 1-6, 6-4, 6-2.
DOUBLES: 1. Senkowski-Fraser
(M) def. Powless-Butterfield, 6-4,
6-4. 2. Lowe-Flood (M) vs. Helft-
Hannas, cancelled. 3. Kalabanx-
Schoene (P) def. Barker-Zelman, 6-4,
6-4.

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I

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