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April 16, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 1963

Netmen Bomb Badgers in Big Ten Opener

By TOM ROWLAND
Michigan's netmen returned to
Ann Arbor after a winless South-
ern trip and whipped Wisconsin,
7-2, here yesterday in a three-
hour-long Big Ten opener.
The Wolverines, who couldn't
pick up a victory in four tries in
Florida during spring vacation,
grabbed wins in all but the num-
ber six singles and number two
doubles matches. It was the second
loss in as many meets for the
Badgers, who fell to Northwestern
earlier this spring, 9-0.

bid for a fifth straight confer-
ence championship. Brian Flood
was the only "M" newcomer who
had much trouble in singles ac-
tion, taking three sets to defeat
Wisconsin's Fred Heivilin, 7-9, 6-3,
6-4, in third singles.
The rest of the soph crew-John
Fraser, Hal Lowe, and Bo Barker
-won in second, fourth, and fifth
singles, with Flood and Lowe los-
ing out in second doubles.
Ray Senkowski opened up his
third year as top Wolverine rack-
etman by rolling past Dave Ober-

down the right side that just nip-
ped the tape gave the Wolverine
senior a 3-2 advantage that stym-
ied any Badger upset attempt.
Fauquier Away
Michigan captain Harry Fau-
quier is in South America repre-
senting Canada in the Pan Amer-
ican games, and Fraser moved up
into the vacated number two sin-
gles slot. Fraser, also a Canadian,
defeated Tom Oberlin in decisive
6-3, 6-3 fashion.
Heivilin took the first set from
Flood after the "M" soph had
control of a 7-6 lead. Flood came
back to a 6-3 win in the second set
and followed by taking a 4-1 ad-
vantage in the third. Heivilin's ral-
ly attempt fell short with the

Good Start lin, 6-4, 6-2. Senkowski broke a
v The Wolverine victory marked a 4-4 deadlock to take the first set
successful Big Ten start for four and then allowed Oberlin two
Michigan sophomores slated to fill games in the second before tak-
the gaps on Coach Bill Murphy's ing six straight. A sizzling drive

DOWN SOUTH:
Cindermen Lash Hurricanes

score 5-4 as the Michigan lefty
banged away a love game, topped
off with the match point that just'
trickled over the net.
Lowe downed Leo Rideout, 6-2,
6-3, and Barker got by Gary Kirk,
6-4, 6-1. The Badgers picked up
their only singles win when Mark
Sessler tripped Ron Linclau on
the sixth court, 6-4, 6-2.
Deadly Duo
Just as deadly in doubles, Sen-
kowski and Fraser teamed up to
roar past a Heivilin-Sessler com-
bo, 6-0, 6-1. Barker and Linclau
won the first set from Rideout and
Jack Rubinowitz, 6-2, in third
doubles, but had to come back
from an 0-3 deficit to win the sec-
ond, 7-5.
Lowe and Flood fell to Wiscon-
sin's Oberlin-Oberlin in second
doubles, 6-1, 1-6, 6-1.
- The Wolverines lost two match-
es to Miami (9-0, 8-1) on the
Southern trip and one each to
Princeton and North Carolina (8-1,
5-4). Senkowski played only once,
and was defeated against Prince-
ton, and Fauquier took over the
number one spot for the other
three matches.
The Wolverines are idle until
Friday, when they travel to Colum-
bus for a quadrangular meet with
Ohio State, Ohio Wesleyan and
Badgers Buried
SINGLES: 1. Senkowski (M) det.
D. Oberlin, 6-4, 6-2. 2. Fraser (M)
def. T. Oberlin, 6-3, 6-3. 3. Flood
(M) def.'Heivilln, 7-9, 6-3, 6-4. 4.
Lowe (M) def. Rideout, 6-2, 6-3. 5.
Barker (M) def. Kirk, 6-4, 6-1. t6.
Sessler (W) def. Linclau, 6-4, 6-2.
DOUBLES: 1. Senkowski-Fraser
(M) def. HeivilinSessler, 6-0, 6-1. 2.
D. Oberlin-T. Oberlin (W) def. Lowe-
Flood, 6-1, 1-6, 6-1. 3. Barker-Lin-
clau (M) def. Rideout-Rubinowitz,
6-2, 7-5.

Cincinnati, the tourney concluding
the following day.
Michigan's remaining h o m e
meets are next Monday, with Pur-
due, April 27 with Notre Dame,
and May 11 with Northwestern,
chief contenders for the Wolver-
ines' crown. It is expected that
Fauquier will be back in time to
compete in this meet, as well as
the Big Ten championships May
16-18 at Evanston.
Last year the Wolverines had an
0-2 spring trip mark.

q

!(I

By CHARLIE TOWLE
Michigan trackmen, acting like
the proverbial mother-in-law house
guest, twice demolished their host
for the spring vacation, the Miami
Hurricanes.
Ten days ago Michigan took
firsts in twelve events missing
only the two hurdle events, the
seldom seen javelin throw and the
mile relay..
Last Saturday the Wolverines
only got eight firsts but one of
them was a record setting effort
by high jumper Al Ammerman, a
Dearborn High School alumnus.
AFL Texans
Vow Switch
Northward
KANSAS CITY (A') - "The
move of the Dallas Texans to Kan-
sas City is signed, sealed and de-
livered with the exception of the
advance ticket sale and a name-
the-team contest," Lamar Hunt
said yesterday.
Hunt, owner of the American'
Football League team, spoke at the'
kickoff of an intensive campaign
to sell 25,000 season tickets to
insure transfer of the club to
Kansas City.
"From what I have observed,
I can have no doubt that the ticket
drive will be anything but a smash
success,", Hunt told nearly 500
persons at the kick-off luncheon.

1

Ammerman has been showing
steady improvement for the past
few months, starting with the Big
Ten indoor championship in which
he placed fourth with a jump of
6'6".
Going Up
Instead of just missing at 6'6"
the slender cinderman was clear-
ing that height and just missing
at 6'8" instead. Saturday Ammer-
man quit flirting with 6'8" when
he cleared that height to set a new
Miami field record. The jump was
the highest of the ex-Michigan
'high schooler's career.
Overall the Michigan trackmen
were not at their best. The hot
Florida sun, the temperature was
around 85 degrees, and the wind
were great for tans but not for
times.
One man who did not let the
heat or the wind bother him was
Kent Bernard. Bernard turned in
two :48.2 timings. His running

mate Dave Romain, meanwhile,
ran second both times to Bernard
clocking a :49.5 ten days ago.
Romain also competed in the
hop, step and jump, or trille jump
as it is now officially called. It
was the first time that the quar-
ter miler had competed in the
event since high school.
Peter Cottontail
He won the event in the first
meet going pseudo-Easter bunny
style for 41'4%/2". Last Saturday,
however, he could only manage a
second.
Good news, too, came in the
100- and 220-yd. dashes. With
Ken Burnley unable. to make the
trip because of a bad leg the con-
dition of Mac Hunter's similarly
Weak leg was a crucial question
mark before the team left. Hunt-
er competed in both the 100 and
220 dashes in both meets without
any sign of injuring his leg. His
best times for the events were
:09.8 and :22.8.

RAY SiNKOWSKI
... number one netter

NEW LOOK:
Ewbank Tali
Titans Renai
NEW YORK (-) - Weeb Ew-
bang became the new coach and
general manager of the New York
entry in the American Football
League yesterday as the new own-
ers abandoned the luckless name
of "Titans" in favor of the New
York Jets.
No contract terms were reveal-
ed for Ewbank, who coached the
Baltimore Colts of the National
Football League for nine years
until he was replaced by Don
Shula Jan. 8. Informed guesses
put his three-year contract at
$100,000.
Unexpired Pact
Ewbank still had two years of
his contract remaining at Balti-
more, reportedly at $30,000 per.
He said a "satisfactory arrange-
ment" was made with Carroll
Rosenbloom, Baltimore owner, but
insisted details should be an-
nounced by Rosenbloom if he so
desired.
David (Sonny) Werblin, presi-
dent of a new group of five men
who recently bought the bankrupt
franchise from Harry Wismer for
a million dollars confirmed the

FUN IN THE SUN-Michigan highjumper Al Ammerman cleared
6'8", the best of his life, in the spring vacation trip to Miami,
Fla., last week. Ammerman, a junior who has placed in every Big
Ten meet of his career, is a former state high school champion
from Dearborn.
.I

Les Controls;
med 'Jets'
hiring of Ewbank at a noon press
corference. It had been the worst
kept secret in years for Ewbank
obviously had been the target for
weeks.
"We° never spoke to another
head coach," said Werblin.
Want Champs
He and his associates had only
one objective, "to build a cham-
pionship team as quickly as possi-
ble."
The club hopes to play its 1963
schedule at Shea Stadium in
Flushing Meadows, which it will
share with the New York Mets.
Ewbank, a chunky 55-year-old
man who carried out a successful
five-year plan with the Colts by
winning a championship in his
fifth year, won the NFL title
twice in 1958 and 1959. His record
for nine years was 59-52-1.
"I don't think this club is any
worse than the Colts when I took
them over," Ewbank said. "I'll
feel right at home. I am used to
challenges. We won't panic. I've
seen sicker cows than this get
well."

r

L

THE THESOPHICAL SOCIETY
of Ann Arbor
presents
Seven Free Public Lectures
on
THE PATH OF PERFECTION
by
Mrs. Mattie Louise Moore
National Theosophical Lecturer
EVERY TUESDAY AT 8:00 P.M.
Room 3-B The Michigan Union
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APOCRYPHA Ot EMAGO$Y Fletcher v. Peck r181 i
exDAiON-REa eTION t EGO INVOLVEMENT
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S ikR-D\RECTED First Punic War fPtiPHR RA4 NERVOUS SYSTEMx
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CiASE RETURNS t tb y idG
C os.Toccata,dtas .a le behavior tHei TIPLEENTEN1
F+ TURES TRADING decans centea i"
PI#. r, r o N, B1ICT M6SLiEAN ANO NEANR ij^ R'.
coeefeahsujettogieyoo

I

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

A

New York
Baltimore
Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
Los Angeles
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
Minnesota

41
3 2
3 2
3 2
2 2
2 2
2 3
2 3
2 3
1 4

Pct.
.800
.600
.600
.600
.500
.500
.400
.400
.400
.200

GB
1
1
12
1%
1
2
2
2
3

7
l
i
7

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
San Francisco 4 1 .900
Philadelphia 4 1 .800
Pittsburgh 4 1 .800 -
Milwaukee 4 2 .667 %
St. Louis 3 2 .600 1
Los Angeles 3 3 .500 12
Chicago 2 3 .400 2
Houston 2 4 .333 2
Cincinnati 1 4 .200 3
New York 0 6 .000 4y
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 4, New York 3
(Only game scheduled)
TODAY'S GAMES
Houston at San Francisco
Chicago at Los Angeles (n)
Philadelphia at Milwaukee
New York at Cincinnati (n)
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (n)

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at New York
Los Angeles at Minnesota
Kansas City at Chicago
Baltimore at Boston
Washington at Cleveland (n)

THE PROBLEM:
Few students can remember every
name, date, formula,, conjugation,
theorem, definition, principle, de-
manded by a 4-year program. Edu-
cators know that through the "ex-
tinction process" you will forget
many of the facts taught last week,
last month, last term, last year.
Thus a "Memory Gap" develops be-
tween the facts you are required
to remember and the facts you do
remember. The smaller you can
make your "Memory Gap" the
higher your grades will be.
THE SOLUTION:
Only DATA-GUIDE solid plastic
loose-leaf summaries are specific-
ally designed to close the "Mem-
ory Gap." DATA-GUIDES preserve,
on solid plastic, the essential fact-

core of each subject to give you a
permanent, portable reference that
can be used from term... to term
...to term-throughout your en-
tire school career. Thus in spite of
lost notes, surrendered texts, a dif-
ficult program, and an overbur-
dened memory, with DATA-GUIDE
'solid-plastic charts, you will al-
ways have the facts you need.
Authored by leading educators, the
subject matter on each DATA-
GUIDE solid-plastic chart is imag-
inatively written and uniquely or-
ganized for rapid fact location and
memory strengthening. Students
throughout the U.S. are using all
plastic DATA-GUIDES to insure
success in school. REMEMBER:
Today's lessons are based on yes-
terday's facts! HOW IS YOUR
MEMORY?

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