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March 29, 1963 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-29

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EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

EIGH THEMICHGAN A__

FID UIAY, MARCHVIE29, 1963

Regents Announce Staff Revisions for Coming Academic Year

'I PRICE

(Continued from Page 2)
tuarial mathematics and to re-
fresh his knowledge in this, field.
Prof. Robert W. Parry of the
chemistry department, to evaluate;
his research program and to write
a number of research papers.
Prof. Frederick H. Test of the
zoology department, to conduct.
research in Africa and in Europe.
Prof. Robert M. Thrall of the
mathematics department, to con-
tinue his work on three book
manuscripts.
Prof. Charles J. Titus of the
mathematics department, to work
and consult with mathematicians'
in various universities in North
Italy..
Prof. John P. White of the poli-
tical science department, to do
research on the problems of legis-
lative apportionment in California.
Academic year, 1963-64:
Prof. John Arthos of the English,
department, to complete a studyE
on changes in the forms of ex-
pression in English literature in3
the Renaissance.
Prof. William S. Benninghoff of
the botany department, a three-
prong project of book revision,
manuscript preparation and fur-
ther research.
Prof. Edward S. Bordin of the
psychology department, to con-
tinue his research on a study of
Sir Robert Borden, prime minister
of Canada, 1911-20 and Canada's
part in World War I.
Prof. Kenneth M. Case of the
physics department, to do research
in theoretical physics.
Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld oft
the political science department,
to study political party leadership
and structure in India.
Prof. Russell H. Fifield of thef
political science department, to
be a research fellow at St. An-
thony's College, Oxford University.
Prof. Donald Hall of the Eng-l
lish department, to write poems
and imaginative prose.
Prof. Karl T. Hecht of the phy-
6ics department, to continue a
change of his major field fromt
the theory of molecular spectra to
nuclear theory.
Prof. George F. Hourani of theI
Near Eastern studies department,
Rto continue research on "theories
of value in medieval Islam." c
Prof. A. Geoffrey Norman of the
botany department and director
of the Botanical Gardens, to visit
leading university departments
anl experiment stations in Sweden.
Prof. James Olds of the psy-
chology department, to establish
a new set of programs on the
neurophysiological mechanismstof
learning.
Prof. Maxwell O. Reade of the
mathematics department, to com-
plete research and write up other
research already completed.
Prof. Noah Sherman of the
physics department, to do research
at the new University of Sussex.
Prof. James R. Squires of the
English department, to do a series
of essays on the Romantic Period
in English poetry.

Prof. Harold E. Wethey of the
history of art department, to pre-
pare a monograph on the Venetian
painter, Titian.
Prof. Edgar E. Willis of the
speech department, to study
broadcasting systems in England,
France, Germany and Italy.
Second semester, 1963-64 and
first semester, 1964-65: Prof. Ger-
ald F. Else, chairman of the classi-
cal studies department, to visit
parts of the classical world and
to write "Aristotle's Poetics: The
Doctrine."
Sabbatical leaves for the first
semester 1963-64 for members of
other faculties: Prof. Ralph M.
Berry of the engineering college,
to work with and later evaluate
studies of the United States Coast
and Geodetic Survey on the satel-
lites ECHO and ANNA.
Prof. Archibald B. Cowan of the
natural resources school to study
wildlife management in the west-
ern United States.
Prof. Kenneth P. Davis of the
natural resources school to study
forest management in Finland and
elsewhere in northern Europe.
Prof. Everett L. Ellis of the nat-
ural resources school to study the
current status of wood fiber re-
search in Scandinavia.
Prof. Harold W. Himes of the,
architecture college to investigate
the changing and expanding ar-
chitectural profession during the
last two decades.
Prof. Robert C. Juvinall of the
engineering college to complete a
textbook on "Strength Considera-
tions in Design."
Prof. Aarre K. Lahti of the ar-
chitecture college to prepare a
manuscript dealing with design
and its source, the culture.
Prof. Guy J. Palazzola of the
architecture college, to do a series
of paintings and photographs on
photographic studies of stone
monuments he will make this;
summer in Italy and Sicily.
Prof. Stephen C. A. Paraskevop-
oulos of the architecture college
to follow a study on foam plastics
and their application to housing
in underdeveloped areas.
Prof. Edward C. Pliske of the+
medical school to finish his studies
on the problem of "the effects of+
dilantin sodium (and other fiber
stimulants) on elastic fibrogen-
esis."
Prof. William H. Stubbins of
the Music School, to complete his+
collating ot acoustics of musical
instruments
Prof. Rohert D. Vinter of the
social work school to complete a
volume on "Organization for
EXPERT and FAST
REPAIRS
on
HI-Fl PHONOGRAPHS
(pick-up and delivery)
H I-Fl STUDIO
1327 S. Univ. Ph. NO 8-7942

Treatment: Comparative Study of
Correctional Institutions."
Prof. Irving H. Anderson of the
education school, to continue his
studies of reading, writing and
spelling achievements of English,
Scottish and American children.
Second Semester, 1963-64:
Prof. Robert L. Dixon of the
business administration school, to
continue his work on an account-
ing textbook.
Prof. Wilford J. Eiteman of the
business administration school, to
continue his study of public own-
ership of corporate securities in
Japan, England, France and Hol-
land.
University Composer in Resi-
dence Ross Lee Finney of the
music school, to complete his
Fourth Symphony and to begin an
opera.
Prof. Dale M. Grimes of the
engineering college, to refine a
textbook he is co-authoring on
"Electric and Magnetic Properties
of Matter."
Prof. Robert W. Hord of the
music school, to continue his work
on a book, "Handbook of Techni-
cal Exercises for the Piano."
Prof. Herbert T Jenkins of the
engineering college, to visit engi-
neerirg colleges in Italy, France,
Switzerland, Germany, the Scan-
dinavian countries and Great Bri-
tain.
Prof. Gale Edward Jensen of
the education school, to revise a
book on the "Formal Organization
of Educational Systems."
Prof. Gerome Kamrowski of the
architecture college, to follow a
study of new art mediums and
techniques.
Prof. William A. Lewis of the
architecture college to work fur-
ther on the problems of the rela-
tionship of the abstract elements
of painting to their emotional im-
pact upon the viewer.
Prof. Charles Lipson of the en-
gineering college, to refine two
manuscripts on his teaching sub-
jects into texts.
Prof. Robert B. Lytle, Jr. of the
architecture college to continue
research on mechanized teaching
techniques for architectural edu-
cation.
Prof. William C. Morse of the
education school, to complete a
joint authorship volume on the
education of the emotionally dis-
turbed child.
Prof. Findlay C. Penix of the
education school, to study inno-
vations in the content of the ele-

mentary school social studies cur-
riculum.
Prof. Walter Sanders of the
architecture college, to investigate
new mathematical theories that
appear to hold promise in their
application to the analysis of
architectural design problems.
Prof. Joseph E. Shigley of the
engineering college, to study new
approaches to engineering design
currently being employed by some
commercial engineering firms.
Prof. Victor L. Streeter of the
engineering college, to continue his
recent research into hydraulic
transients by field visits to loca-
tions where waterhammer prob-
lems exist.
Prof. Clyde H. Thompson of the
music school, to gather additional
information for a book on the 17th
Century composers and perform-
ers.
Prof. Chi-Shun Yih of the en-
gineering college, to do research
in Europe in fluid mechanics.
Prof. Leonard W. Zamiska of
the architecture school, to make
rubbings of old epitaphs and ceno-
taphs to check if lettering styles
on stone developed with the man-
uscript style of the same periods.
University year. 1963-64:
Prof. Lyle E. Crane of the natu-
ral resources school, to complete
a book on national water policy
and those of either England or
Israel.
Dr. Thomas N. Cross of the
medical school, July 15, 1963 to
July 15, 1964, to pursue his studies
in the field of artistic creativity
and its psychoanalytic interpreta-
tions.
Dr. Sibley W. Hoobler of the
medical school, July 1, 1963 to
June 30, 1964, to do research work
on renal, humoral and stress in-
duced hypertension.
Prof. Dick A. Leabo of the busi-
ness administration school, to re-
vise the first edition of his book,
"Bas'c Statistics for Business Eco-
nomics." He will continue to serve
as associate dean of the school of
business administration half-time.
Prof. Thomas M. Sawyer of the
engineering college, to fulfill a
Fullbright Lectureship at the West
Pakistan Techn:cal University in
L'ch Gre.
Dr. Walloce W. Tourtellctte cf
the medical sc iool, July 1, 1963 to
June 30, 19-34 tc serve as visiting
assistant professor of pharmacol-
ogy and neurology at the Wash-
ngton University School of Medi-
cine.

lrof. Frank B. Womer of the
education echooi Aug. 15, 1963 to
June 15, 1964, to prepare informa-
ticn on test irterpretation for
school teachers and to study tests
used abroad.
Leaves other than sabbatical
(for University year 1963-64 un-
less otherwise noted)
Prof. William P. Alston of the
philosophy department, to become
a Fellow at the Center for Ad-
vanced Study in the Behavioral
Sciences at Palo Alto, Calif.
Prof. Wallace T. Berry of the
music school, to complete his book,
"Studies in Musical Form."
Prof. Edward S. Epstein of the
engineering college, to serve in the
office of the United States secre-
tary of commerce for science and
technology,
Prof. Merrill M. Flood of the'
mathematics department and the
Mental Health Research Institute,
to be visiting professor of business
administration at the University'
of California, Berkeley.,
Prof. Edward 0. Gilbert of the
engineering college, to be vice-
president of research and engi-
neering at Applied Dynamics, Ann
Arbor.
Prof. John A. Hanson of the
classical studies department, to
teach at Swarthmore College. <
Prof. Dallas L. Jones of the bus-
iness administration school, from1
March 15 to April 15, 1963, to
give a series of lectures at the
Salzburg Seminar in American
Studies, Salzburg, Germany.
Prof. William P. Malm of the
music school, to complete his study
and research on the music of the
Japanese puppet theater.
Frof. John W. Reed of the Law
School, to be visiting professor of
law at the Yale University Law
School.
Prof. William L. Root of the en-
gineerng college, for 12 m ;nths
effective Sept. 1, 1963, to vork at
the Mathematics Research Center
at the University of Wisconsin.
Prof. Leonard J. Savage of the,

raihematics department, to ac-
cept a visiting appointment at the
Center for Advanced Study in the
Behavioral Sciences.
Sick leave for John M. Sheldon,
M.D.., from Jan. 16 through June
30, 1963.
Prof. William W. Willmarth of
the engineering college, to accept
a visiting membership in the Joint
Institute of Laboratory Astro-
physics at the University of Colo-
rado.
Off-campus assignments:
Prof. John Bowditch of the his-
tory department, for the first
semester, 1963-64, to resume his
research on the concepts and
practices of "total" war.
Prof. Roger F. Hackett of the
history department, to continue
his research on the political mod-
ernization of Japan for the Uni-
versity year, 1963-64, under a Car-
negie Corporation grant.
Dr. John T. Hayes of the medi-
cal school, to visit major teaching
centers in England, Scotland and
Wales, from April 15 through June
30, 1963, under a grant from the
American Orthopaedic Associa-
tion.
Prof. Spencer L. Kimball of the
Law School, to do a comparative
Srdy of insurance regulation in
Germany with particular empha-
sis upon problems created by the
Common Market, from June 1963
through August, 1964, under a
Ford Foundatiin grant.
Prof. Maurice H. Seevers of the
pharmacy college, to do research
on narcotics in Japan, from March
25 through April 23, 1963.
BENTON HARBOR
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SUMMER SESSION,
June 17 to July 26.
For
information and application,
write
Director of Summer Session.

Angel

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PRESENTS

ALL OTHER ANGELS
List $3.98 NOW $1.99
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List $5.98 Now $3.59
DISC SHOP HEFI, CENTER
1210 S. University 304 5. Thayer
NO 3-6922 NO 5-4855

DR. GEORGE L.GRASSMUCK
Assoc. Prof. of Political Science - speaking on
"A NEW ARAB NATIONALISM"
Recent Arab Political Changes and Their Implications for Nassr

DISC SHOP HIFI CENTER
1210 5. University 304 S. Thayer
NO 3-6922 NO 5-4855

SUNDAY AT 7 P.M., after Supper Club

1429 Hill

St.

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9ap0ueu 9rph e 9,,4
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish
IPIZZAI
will be served daily from
12 Noon to 2 P.M. and 5 P.M. to 2 A.M.
FREE DELIVERY
from 5 P.M. to 2 A.M.
INCLUDING NORTH CAMPUS

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Enjoy dinner in the romantic
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LUNCH EON
AFTERNOON SNACKS
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OPEN 11 A.M. to 8 P.M.
Sunday 12:00 to 8:00 P.M.
Friday and Saturday 'til 11:30 P.M.
?he VIRGINIMR
RESTAURANT

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Serving your favorite
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