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March 29, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-29

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THE MIC~HIG'ANIMUATIN

' 11RL ifl llJ 111 Vt111 11ii1LL

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1963

3

M T a

Views Need
For Growth
,Of Facilities
(Continued from Page 1)
"expedient" to do so. "In the past
it hasbeen necessary to vote re-
luctantly for tuition hikes because
of other factors than the stu-
dents." He stresses the importance
of maintaining a high level of
faculty salaries, and said that this
is one of the few reasons for
which he would increase tuition
rates.
Late Notification
Thurber says that he sees no
way to get around the lateness of
notification about tuition hikes
because the University receives its
appropriations so late in the year.
However, he stresses the fact that
increases in student fees are al-
ways accompanied by increases in
available scholarship and loan as-
sistance. "The Regents give strict
instructions not to let anyone drop
out of school because of financial
need."
Although he is reluctant to raise
tuition, Thurber sees no "break in
costs" for higher education. How-
ever, "the state will support in-
stitutions of higher learning in
the future," he predicts.
To minimize the high cost of
educational institutions Thurber
does not favor severe limitations
on the number of out-of-state
students or on the size of the
campuses. "I am against turning
the University into an insular in-
stitution." The University is a
"world-wide treasure" of the state.
He also opposes straight-acketing
the University to a campus of
27,500 students, as legislators have
proposed.
Role of Regents
Thurber views the role of the
Regent as that of any public ser-
vant-to be responsible to his con-
stituency and to provide leader-
ship. The Regent is more expert on
educational matters than the gen-
eral public. Regents would not be
elected to eight year terms if the
public did not expect them to in-
itiate policy on their own, Thur-
ber comments.
The Regents must "keep an open
mind and, not frustrate new) ideas
and proposals." Thurber says that
he favors student participation in
academic policy-making for an
educational experience. However,
he maintains that the operating
areas of 'decision-making cannot
be turned over to the students
because, as transient members of
the University community, they
need the continuity and intergra-
tion function of the administra-
tion and faculty.
Liberal Arts -
:As a Regent, "I am' a strong
up-holder of the liberal arts tra-
dition. Students should learn how
to make a life not just a living;"
he maintains.
Thurber, a graduate of Harvard,
magna cum laude in 1940, was
appointed to the board by former
Gov. G. Mennen Williams on Jan.
1, 1958, to fill the ,unexpired term
of Paul L. Adams, who resigned to
become attorney general.
The president of Public Rela-
tions Counselors, Inc., he has spent
summers attending classes at the
University. He is also president of
the Detroit Financial Printing
Company, and was president of the
Rotary Press, Inc. from 1954-58.
During the same years he was a
member of the Michigan Crippled
Children's Commission.

SPEECH TO YR'S:
Lamb Favors Passing
Proposed Constitution

By GERALD STORCH
The Young Republicans Wednes-
day night heard Prof. Karl Lamb
of the political science department
analyze and refute two of the
main objections to the proposed
State Constitution.
First of all, "many people oppose
the new document because it falls
short of some ideal."
However, the important question
is whether or not it accurately re-
flects the desires of Michigan
citizens and whether it is a better
constitution than the present one
-and the proposed charter scores
on both counts, Prof. Lamb said.
A group of political science pro-
fessors probably could sit down
one afternoon and write a better
draft, he remarked. "But it
wouldn't be adopted," whereas the
proposed constitution probably
will.
Ideal Document
Additionally, Germany's Weimar
Constitution of the 1920's was
lauded as an "ideal" document by
political scientists of that time,
but it was a failure.
A second major criticism often
advanced is based on a prediction
of how the state Legislature will
perform in the future. Judging by
the actions (and inaction) of the
Senate "veto bloc" in the past 12
years, some people say "you just
can't trust the Legislature," Prof.
Lamb said.
Senior Groups
Select Women
At Ceremonies
Two senior women's honorary
societies have tapped a total of
33 coeds to join their ranks.
Mortar Board, the senior wom-
en's scholastic and activity hon-
orary for scholarship, leadership
and service tapped 17 coeds at
Women's Recognition Night last
night.
Senior Society, the all-campus
honorary for unaffiliated women
early this morning recognized the
leadership and service in extra-
curricular activities of 16 women.
Those tapped for Mortar Board were:
Edith Bassichis, '64; Linda Burson, '64;
Marjorie Brahms, '64; Patricia Carlson,
'64; Patricia Elkins, ,'4; Gail Feldman,
'65; Charlene Hager, '65; Suzanne Ko-
prince, '64; Barbara Lazarus, '64; Mary1
Beth Norton, '64; Francis Parr, '64; Mi-
chal Schover, '65; Grace Saefke, '64M;
Judeth Van Hamm, '63A&D; MaryVan
Loo, '63; Wallis Wilde, '64, and Freya'
Yaffe, '64.
Those tapped for Senior Society were:
Marporie Bloom, '64Ed; Gloria Bowles,
'64; Laurieann Chutis, '64; Susan Drud-
ing, '63; -Lois Fisher, '64; Margaret7
Franks, '64; Barbara Greenstein, '64;
Jeanette Hoffman, '64M; Carol Iso-
talo, '64; Beverly Karanovich, '64SM;
Mary Jo Kuehn, '64Ed; Kay Kuick, '64;
Kay Pomerance, '63; Susan Schacthel,
'64Ed;'Catherine Sipe,. '64, and Ruth
Stephenson, '64BAd.
Sends Schedules
To Dormitories
Time schedules for the fall se-
mester have been sent to the
residence halls by James H. Rob-t
ertson, associate dean of the lit-
erary college. They are to be madet
available by house officers to aid
students in preclassifying. J

PROF. KARL LAMB
... urges ratification
These fears are inaccurate and
outdated, Prof. Lamb said, since
Republican moderates now control
the Senate.
"The Constitutional Convention
marks a new era in Michigan
politics; we now have every reason
to expect responsible behavior
from the Legislature," he continu-
ed.
Vote on Constitution
In repsonse to questions after-
ward, Prof. Lamb declared that the
document, contrary to Democrat
requests for a section-by-section
presentation at the polls next
Monday, has to be voted on as
a whole. Otherwise, there would
be hopeless confusion.
He also replied to attacks on
the proposed approtionment com-
mission, whose members would be
chosen in regional elections, notI
state-wide. Prof. Lamb pointed out
that reapportionment guidelines
are so specific in the document
that "it doesn't really matter who
the members are."
Across
Campus
As a part of the music school's
Contemporary Music Festival,
Maynard Klein will conduct a
concert for organ and choir. The
concert which is one of a series
which is being given at the Uni-
versity will take place at 8:30 p.m.
today in Hill Aud. The University
Symphony Choir will perform
along with Marilyn Mason who'
will be playing the organ.
Slerif Speaks,...
Dr. Muzafer Sherif of the Uni-
versity of Oklahoma will speak on
"Research on Intergroup Rela-
tions" at a Psychology Colloquim
at 4:15 p.m. today in Aud. B.
There will be a coffee hour at
3:45 p.m. in 3417 Mason Hall.
Gambling .. .
The annual Monte Carlo Ball
will be held from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
this Saturday in the League Ball-
room. The Ball will feature danc-
ing, mock gambling and a floor-
show. The profits from the Ball
will be put into an emergency
fund with the International Cen-
ter.
Latvians.. .
The Latvian Students Club will
present Latvian Night, a cultural
program featuring a discussioni
and demonstration of Latvian folk
songs, at 7:30 p.m. today at theF
International Center.E
ORGANIZATIONt
NOTICES

Regents A
The Regents approved the fol-
lowing changes in status for fac-
ulty and staff at their regular
meeting Friday:
Hugh E. Bradley of Johns Hop-
kins University appointed assis-
tant professor of industrial en-
gineering, effective June 15,
Alvin I. Goldman of Princeton
University appointed assistant pro-
fessor of philosophy effective with
the coming semester.
Nathan B. Gross of Lehigh Uni-
versity to be appointed professor
of physical psychology in the Med-
ical School effective Sept. 1.
Acoustics Professor
Joseph E. Hawkins, Jr. of New
York University appointed pro-
fessor of physiological acoustics,
effective Sept. 1. He is currently
on leave from NYU under a United
States Public Health Service fel-
lowship at the University of Gote-
burg.
Dorothy Ann Huskey of the
United States Public Health Ser-
vice appointed assistant professor
of health education in the public
health school effective March 1.
Vincent Massey of the Univer-
sity of Sheffield appointed profes-
sor of biological chemistry in the
Medical School, effective Sept. 1.
Richard P. Mitchell appointed
assistant professor of history ef-
fective with the fall semester. He
is now an intelligence research
analyst with the state department.
New Department
Prof. Herbert H. Paper, acting
chairman of the Near Eastern
studies department appointed the
first chairman of the new lin-
guistics departnent effective July
1.
Prof. Marc H. Ross of Indiana
University appointed professor of
physics, effective with the fall
semester.
Melvyn L Semmel of George
Peabody College for Teachers ap-
pointed assistant professor of edu-
cation, effective Aug. 27.
Prof. Burton E. Voss of Penn-
sylvania State University appoint-
ed asociate professor of science
education, effective Aug. 27.
Prof. H. Arlen Brown of Rice
Institute appointed associate pro-
fessor of mathematics, effective
with the fall semester.
Prof. Edward V. Olencki to re-
place Prof. C. Theodore Larson on
the executive committee of the
architecture college for the cur-
rent semester. Prof. Larson is on
sabbatical.
Dr. Norman S. Hayner of the
public health school named as-
sistant professor of epidemiology
retroactive to Jan. 1.
Dr. Benjamin C. Johnson of the
Medical School named assistant
professor of epidemiology, retro-
active to Jan. 1.
Change in Status
Dr. Millicent W. Payne of the
Medical School named assistant
professor of epidemiology, retro-
active to Jan. 1.
Prof. Edward B. Ham of the

pprove Status Changes for Faculty, Staff

French department resigned ef-
fective Aug. 17 to accept a posi-
tion at Alameda State College in
California.
Prof. William C. McCrary of the
Spanish department resigned ef-
fective June 8, because of his "lack
of confidence in the long-term
Sfinancial support of educational
institutions in Michigan."
Prof. Robert L. Politzer of the
romance languages department
resigned effective Aug. 17 to ac-
cept a position at Stanford Uni-
versity.
SABBATICALS
The Flint College
Full academic year, 1963-64:
Prof. Edward T. Calver, to work
on a new approach to English
grammar;, Prof. Donald E. De-
Graff, to concentrate on his re-
search and preparation of a text-
book on 20th century physics.
Summer session: Associate Dean
Robert H. Plummer, to work on
a book on junior colleges.
Fall semester: Prof. Alfred C.
Raphelson, to do research on brain
structure in Ann Arbor; Prof. Rob-
ert M. Weiss, to work on a his-
torical study of the views of the
Roman Catholic Church toward
American public education, 1852-
93.
Spring semester, 1964: Prof. Vir-
gil Bett, for a study of Mexican
banking as related, to national
development; Prof. Harry H.
Blecker, to study the use of the
kinetic isotope effect in reaction
mechanisms.
Literary College
Fall semester, 1963: Prof. Frank
X. Braun of the German depart-
ment to do research in contempor-
ary German prose writers and
their productions.
Prof. Ruel V. Churchill of the
mathematics department, to con-
tinue his work toward a book on
the operational mathematics of
integral transforms.
Prof. James B. Griffin of the
anthropology department, director
of the anthropology museum, to
lecture or North American ar-
chaeology and to conduct a sem-'
inar at the University of Copen-
hagen.
Prof. Kenneth L. Jones of the
botany department, to prepare
course materials for use on the
occasion of his return to full-time
teaching after serving as depart-
ment chairman for 12 years.
Prof. William R. Leslie of the
history department, to continue
his research on 18th century con-
cepts of law as they relate to the
American Constitution..
Prof. Robert J. Niess of the Ro-
mance languages department to go
to Paris to collect Zola's articles
on the Goncourt Brothers with the
aim of publishing an annotated
volume.
Prof. Chester B. Slawsori of the
geology department to make a
study of the diamond mines of
Africa.

Prof. Albert K. Stevens of the
English department, to study the
teaching of English in southern
England.
Prof. Alfred H. Stockard of the
zoology department, director of
the Biological Station, to visit in-
land and coastal biological stations
in this country.
Prof. Nathan T. Whitman of the
history of art department, to visit,
study and photograph late baroque
palaces throughout western Eur-
ope in preparation for a book.
Spring semester, 1964:
Prof. Joseph B. Adelson of the
psychology department, to com-
plete a research project on the
development of political ideas dur-
ing adolescence.
Prof. John M. Allen of the zool-
ogy department, to complete work
on a revision of George Gomori's
Histochemistry.
Prof. William B. Ballis of the
political science department, to
finish an extensive study of the
history, ideology, structure and
operation of the Soviet govern-
ment.
Prof. Charles B. Beck of the
botany department, to collect fos-
sils in Great Britain for his study
of the origin and evolution of
gymnosperms.
Prof. Russell E. Bidlack of the
University Unit
To Go on Tour

library science department, to Prof. Howard M. Ehrmann of
write a history of the University the history department, to do re.
Library from 1852 to 1877. search on Italian foreign. policy
Prof. Deming B. Brown of the from World War I to the present.
Slavic languages and literatures Prof. Donald F. Eschman, chair-
department, to do research on the man of the geology department, to
works of 19th century Russian go to Great Britain to become bet-
writers. ter acquainted with current work
Prof. Clyde H. Coombs of the in geomorphology and physical
psychology department, to visit geography.
some of the principal universities Prof. Edwin N. Goddard of the
in Europe where research is being geology department, to study geol-
done in mathematical psychology. ogic structures in the southern
Prof. Horace W. Dewey of the Rockies, Mexico and the Pacific
Slavic languages and literatures Coast states.
department to finish a book on Prof. George W. Nace of the
Muscovite legal history from 1480 zoology department, to visit re-
to the early 17th century. search laboratories in Japan.
Prof. Max Dufner, of the Ger- Prof. Cecil J. Nesbitt of the
man department, to write a major mathematics department, to pur-
portion of a book on the works of sue research and writing in ac-
Christoph Martin Wieland. (Continued on Page 8)
I -

4

Dial
2-6264
STARTING SATURDAY

? *, ROMANCE HITS
A HIGH SEA ..
When America's favorite
songstress gives a 21-Fun
salute to the Navy-

iiK
KI

" ENDING TODAY 0
Eddy Fathom-
Feature at 1-2:55
5:00-7:08 & 920
t,,;rFare 8 iy
-'
FA

Of
The
going
series

Six

States

University Band will be
on the road to present a
of eight concerts in six

filmed in the tamed
golerna plavs e uoco
IPA NAVISIONS 4 METROCOLOR .,.
CONNIE FRANCIS PANIIPRENTISS -MPA ROB
RHOSS TAMOtN"' RIHAD SONG RON MNE
ROGER PERRY and JANIS PAIGE RICHARD ┬░THORPE"

states at the beginning of April.
The ensemble will include in its
tour repitoire a number of univer-
sal favorites and a "challenging"
clarinet sextet.
A number of tunes wil be played
which were performed by the band
during its 1961 Cultural Exchange
Tour to the Soviet Union and the
Near East.
The band is under the direction
of Prof. William D. Revelli who is
now in his twenty-eighth year as
conductor of University bands.
The tour will start on April 3
and end on April 10. The Band will
perform at the University of Ver-
mont and at the University of New
Hampshire. It will also play in
Philadelphia, Pa., Utica, N.Y.,
Snyder, N.Y., Hartford, Conn. and
Silver Spring, Md.
Prof. Reveilli is well known to
the students of the University for
his work with the Michigan
Marching Band during the foot-
ball season. The Michigan March-
ing Band performs at the begin-
ning of all football games and dur-
ing half times.

continuing tonight

8:00 Mendelssohn

Theatre

U-M Players present
THE
HOUSE
OF
BERNARD A

1.t..J~:":.. ....., .ti:",*.r. J". ."S }1'. .. 14"5. .4. . . . ...... f ':"-'7'4"..... .

".C. CINEMA GUILD rea t4
Last Times Tonight at 7 and 9
ALEC GUINNESS in
OUR MAN IN, HAVANA
starring
NOEL COWARD- RALPH RICHARDSON
and ERN I E KOVACS
A very funny satire on intrigue in Pre-Castro Cuba
Directed by CAROL REED
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 Cents

Alpha Omega Fellowship, Regular
Meeting of Class: "Harmony of the
Gospels," Every Sunday morning, 10
a.m., 110 N. State St. Everyone welcome.
Congr. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, Cost
Luncheon Discussion: "Your Issues,"
March 29, Noon, 802 Monroe.
S* * s
Mich. Christian Fellowship, March 29,
7:30 p.m., Union. Speaker: Dr. G. E.
Mendenhall, Prof. of Near Eastern
Studies, "Faith & Rationality in Bib-
lical Times."
Near East Club, Lecture: "Arab So-
cialism as an Economic Philosophy" by
Dr. R. Barlow, Economics Dept., March
29, 8 p.m., Rackham Bldg., E. Conf. Rm.;
Lecture: "The Current Situation in the
Near East as Seen from Lebanon"
by Dr. Hassan Saab, April 1, 8 pm.,
Rackham Bldg., Ampitheatre.

sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
FRIDAY, MARCH 29
.Day Calendar
4:15 p.m.-Dept. of Psychology Collo-
quium-Prof. Muzafer Sherif will speak
on "Research on Intergroup Relations,"
in Aud. B, Angell Hall.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild -
Alec Guinness, Noel Coward, Ralph
Richardson, and Ernie Kovacs in "Our
Man in Havana"; short, "Movie Star's
Stampede" with Will Rogers and Buck
Jones: Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m-TV Center Public Informa-
tion Program Film Showing-CBS film
"The Water Famine," narrated by How-
ard K. Smith; Panel Discussion-G. R.
Garrison, director of broadcasting; Olin
Browder, Prof. of Law; L. E. Craine,
Prof. of Conversation; and Prof. Ken-
neth C. McMurry: Aud. A, Angell Hall.
8:00 p.m.-Dept. of Speech Univ. Play-
ers Production-Federico Lorca's "The
House of Bernarda Alba": Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Contem,
porary Musical Festival Concert of Mu4
sic for Organ and Choir-Univ. Sym-
phonic Choir; Ma jnard Klein, conduc-
tor; Marilyn Mason, organ: Hill Aud.
General Notices
German University Exchange Scholar-
ship: Two grants for study at The Free
Univ. of Berlin have been made avail-
able to Univ. of Michigan students.
These grants provide tuition fees, a
maintenance allowance, and travel from
European port. Candidates are selected
on the basis of the following criteria: 1)
General academic achievement and po-
tential, 2) Upperclass or graduate stand-
ing by the autumn of 1963, 3) German
language competence. Applications are
available at the Scholarship Office, 2011
Student Activities Bldg. Deadline for
receipt of completed applications is
April 1. Further information on this
exchange program may be obtained
from Dr. James M. Davis, International
Center.

Special Notice to all Chamber Music
Ushers: All persons who ushered for
the recent Chamber Music Series in
Rackham-Budapest Quartet-are re-,
minded that the Julian Bream concert
in Rackham this Sun., March 31, is also
included in the Chamber Music Series,4
and you are expected to usher for this
concert. Consult the back of your Usher
Ticket, for time and date. All other;
persons who are interested in ushering
for this concert please contact Mr.j
Warner at NO 8-8597.
Summary of Action Taken by StudentI
Government Council at Its Meeting of
March 27, 1963t
Approved: Temporary recognition for
the Culture Club and the Friends of
the Student Non-violent Coordinating
Committee.C
Approved: Name change of the Michi-

gan Folk Dancers to the University of
Michigan International Folk Dancers.
Approved: That Pam Erickson be ap-
pointed to the Committee on Student
Concerns as a non-Council member for
a term ending May 30, 1963.
Approved: That Student Government
Council hereby appoints Mary Beth
Norton to the Committee on the United
States National Student Association for
a term ending in December, 1963.
Approved: That Student Government
Council appoints Mary Beth Norton and
Pete Eisinger to the Regional Executive
Committee of the Michigan Region of
USNSA.
Adopted: That Student Government
Council expresses its desire to have
the University of Michigan host the
Seventeenth National Student Congress.
Student Government Council hereby
commits itself to secure- the necessary
(Continued on Page 4)

ALB A

$1.75, 1.25
last performance tomorrow

by
Federico Garcia

box off ice

12 :30-8:00

NOW DIAL
8-6416
moIs surrounded by
Y om b overwhelming praise!
"A MASTERPIECE OF FILM MAKING-A WOW OF A SHOW!"
TIME
"DAZZLING!" "SUPERB"
TRIBUNE MIRROR
"CINEMATIC "NOT TO
POWER!" BE MISSED!"
TIMES BAZAAR

POSITIVELY
LAST TWO DAYS
Ends Saturday
FREUD HAS BEEN ACCLAIMED
BY THE NEW YORK CRITICS AS
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BESTI"
FREUD IS "A BOLD, DRAMATIC, MOMENTOUS,
TASTEFUL, DARING AND FASCINATING FILM
THAT EVERYONE WILL ENJOY!"
\\\ \ \ \ \ \ CROWTHER, N.. T/MES
FREUD IS "A TAUT, INTELLECTUAL
THRILLER...VASTLY EXCITING!"
\\\ \ \ \ TIME MAGAZIAE
FREUD IS "A SUPERB DRAMA,
AN ENGROSSING FILM, PENETRATINGLY

Lorca

,

"FASCINATING!"
NEWSWEEK

I r.rr

"MAGNIFICENT!"
SAT. REVIEW
"VISUALLY
FAULTLESS!"
SIGHT & SOUND

"STYLE
AND ZEST!"
LIFE

"A WHAMDINGER OF A THRILLER!"
CUE

I

I

Get your tickets NOW to theQ
International Students Association
MONTE CARLO BALL

DIFFERENT... MAKES CINEMA HISTORYI"
UF MAGAZIN
IREUD
ir/ic 1 i r

-- mlvi

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