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March 20, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-20

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ARCH 20, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

M a 04 vw -W.4pi

THE MICIGAN aaiT.

PAGE THREE

x

I Algeria Claims France
Explodes Atom Device
Under Desert Province

Korean Leader Agrees
To Wait on Referendum
SEOUL (M)-Korean Gen. Chung Hee Park hedged yesterday under
pressure from civilian political opponents-and evidently from the
United States-on his plan for an April referendum to prolong mili-
tary rule.
The junta chief said he is withdrawing the proposal for 12 days,
that is until March 31. But Park's official spokesman announced con-
ditions that irked his Korean critics:.
1) The ban imposed last Saturday on South Korean political ac-
tivity will continue. 2) The junta will consider giving up power only if
"corrupt politicians" agree not to
run for office in the next election.
Two participants in a tense, two-
hour conference with Park-for-
mer President Yun Po-Sun and
former Premier Lee Bum-Suk-de-
lared they will continue their at-
.:: tempts to force a full and imme-
diate reversal of his attempt to
retain power.

ECONOMIC MEASURES:
Presidents Plan Cuban Policy

-----,:,

COMMUNISM CHARGE:
U.S. Moves To Temper
Brazilian Controversy
WASHINGTON (P)-The United States sought yesterday to calm
the storm it stirred in Brazil last week with a statement charging
Communists have infiltrated the Brazilian government.
The State Department tempered the United States stand, saying it
was not timed to affect current Brazilian negotiations for United
States aid, nor intended to suggest Communists "have a substantial
influence on Brazilian government policy."
Acting Secretary of State George; W. Ball said the reference to

Communist infiltration had been'

"torn out of context and misinter-
4preted" to suggest the Communist
influence charge. That was "un-
fortunate," he said.
Asks 'Collaboration'
Ball's statement, read to news-
men by press officer Lincoln
White, appealed for continued
"constructive collaboration" and
"strong and solid cooperation" be-
tween the United States and Bra-
zil.
It deplored "minor and unwar-
ranted misunderstandings," which
seem to stem from one or more
blunderings by the State Depart-
ment itself in trying to deal with
the situation last week.
Though it tempered the charge
of Communists in government, the
State Department did not apolo-
gize and did not withdraw the
statement. But its tone was con-
ciliatory and there appears little
doubt that Brazilian Finance Min-
ister Francisco Santiago Dantas
will obtain substantial United
States financial help.
Goulart Upset
The statement yesterday follow-
ed weekend reports that Brazilian
President Joao Goulartwas angri-
ly upset over the United States
government's assertion. This rais-
ed a question whether United
States Ambassador Lincoln Gor-
don, here for Dantas' financial
talks, would be able to return to
his post in Brazil.
At Rio de Janeiro, aides indi-
cated that Goulart was satisfied
with yesterday's statement.

Protest Test
As Attacking
Sovereignty
Syria, Morocco Join
In Condemnations
ALGIERS (R) - The Algerian
government said yesterday that
France touched off an under-
ground atomic explosion in the
Sahara Monday and called the test
"a direct attack on the independ-
ence and sovereignty of Algeria."
There was no official French
confirmation or denial that anoth-
er test had been conducted, but
preparations for one had been
widely rumored in Paris for days.
French Information Minister
Alain Peyrefitte, without confirm-
ing a blast, said that France has
every right to test atomically in
the Sahara bases she retained for
five years under the Algerian in-
depender - agreement.
Syria and Morocco joined Al-
geria in protests. The Algerian Na-
tional Assembly was5 called into
special session Wednesday to con-
sider decisions taken by the cab-
inet of Premier Ahmed Ben Bella.
The nature of the decisions was
not disclosed, but Algeria has
threatened to break off coopera-
tion agreements with France if the
test was made.
Each of four preceding French
atomic tests in the Sahara touch-
ed off a series of protests from
African nations. Some countries,
including Nigeria, broke diplomat-
ic relations with France for a time
after a 1961 blast.
In Geneva, the Canadian and
Indian delegates to the 17-nation
disarmament conference said if
the report of a new test is true it
would hamper attempts to reach
an agreement on a nuclear test
ban.

GEORGE W. BALL
Brazilian controversy
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
ST. PAUL-Democrat Karl Rol-
vaag moved within one legal step
yesterday of the Minnesota's gov-
ernor's office that has been hang-
ing in the balance since the elec-
tion four and a half months ago.
s . .

GEN. CHUNG HEE PARK
... withdraws proposal
EXILE RAIDS:
Hit Attacks
By Groups
WASHINGTON (R)-The Unit-
ed States said yesterday it strong-
ly opposes hit-and-run raids on
Cuba by refugee groups.
It called them irresponsible and
ineffective in ridding the island
of Fidel Castro's Communist re-
gime.
In a firmly worded statement,
the State Department said it is
investigating whether there was
any violation of United States laws
in a reported attack by Cuban
exile commandos on a Russian
camp and ship in Northern Cuba
Sunday.
United States laws prohibit pri-
vate armed forays from United
States territory against a foreign
nation. The Justice Department
said it also is investigating wheth-
er the reported attack involves any
violation of the neutrality act or
other laws.
Anti - Castro Cuban refugee
sources in Miami reported Monday
night that two groups known as
Alpha 66 and the Second National
Front of Escambray Joined forces
and shelled both a Soviet military
camp and one of its ships near
Sabua La Grande in Las Villas
province.
The sources claimed some Rus-
sians were killed. Havana radio
reported later that some wounded
sailors had been taken to a hospi-
tal, but the broadcast did not men-
tion their nationality or anything
about a raid.

"Any conditional proposal is not
acceptable," Yun declared.
They were among five leading
civilian politicians who called on
the General to demand an end to
military rule and restoration of
the plan for general elections that
Park once promised would be held
this spring.
A leading official of the recently
formed Civil Rule party, which
wants Yun back as chief executive,
declared "we will employ what-
ever means there are" to end the
administration of this nation of
25 million by the armed forces.
The civilians' dissatisfaction did
not escape the military.
When Yun arrived home from
Park's office he found waiting the
same police who had cordoned off
his house earlier in the day, plac-
ing him under virtual house ar-
rest.
But the police had taken down
red cord across two approaches to
the house and an "off limit" sign.!
They were pursuing a kid glove
policy.
The United States, which has!
pumped $3.5 billion into South Ko-
rea since World War II, kept a
close watch on the developments.
United States Ambassador Sam-I
uel Berger had what he called "a
general discussion of the situa-
tion" with Premier Kim Hyun-
Chul shortly before Park met thej
politicians. American economic
aid being negotiated for 1963
amounts to about $191 million.

SAN JOSE, Costa Rica R) -
President John F. Kennedy and
the chief executives of six Central
American nations reached an!
agreement yesterday on what to
do about Cuba.
The Central American presidents
also called a meeting of their
interior ministers next month to
"put into immediate effect com-
mon measures" to halt the flow of
'Send A laska
WASHINGTON (M)-Alaska's air
defenses have been stiffened with
new faster-than-sound nuclear-
tipped missiles mounted on Air
Force interceptor planes that
guard the huge, sparsely populat-
ed state.
This was disclosed yesterday
after penetration by two Soviet
reconnaissance planes over a cor-
ner of Alaska last Thursday night
raised alarm concerning the vul-
nerability of the new state, lying
close to Siberia.
Alaskan members of Congress
and Gov. William Egan have de-
manded federal action to give the
state better protection.
"The air defense of Alaska is
adequate," the Defense Depart-
ment told the Associated Press.
"We are continually improving
our radar and updating aircraft
with improved air-to-air missiles
and improved radar."
It was learned that the air-to-
air missiles are advanced models
of the Falcon.
The Falcon is a slim, 7-foot-
long rocket that can be guided to
its target by radar. It carries a
nuclear warhead.
"This latest Falcon fills a vital
need in the air defense command
for a nuclear defense weapon giv-
ing safe and effective protection
against fast-closing, head-on at-
tacks by enemy supersonic bomb-
ers," says an official Defense De-
partment publication on United
States missiles.

TONIGHT at 8
IRVING KAUFMAN, Asst. Prof. of Art
"JEWISH CONSCIOUSNESS AND THE ARTS"
Lecture No. 2 in Spring Series of WEDNESDAYS AT 8
"THE JEW IN WESTERN CULTURE"
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill St.

Castro Communist agents, arms
and propaganda between Cuba and
their countries.
In a 2000-word "Declaration of
Central America," President Ken-
nedy and the chiefs of state of
Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua,
El Salvador, Guatemala and Hon-
duras declared "their conviction
that Cuba soon will join the fam-
ily of free nations."
Most of the Declaration was de-
voted to plans for economic devel-
opment of the Central American
nations. But it was emphasized
that the economic and social pro-
grams' success depended on meas-
ures to contain subversion from
Cuba.,
"In order to carry out their
programs for social and economic
betterment," it said, "it is essen-
tial to reinforce the measures to
meet subversive aggression orig-
inating in focal points of Commu-
nist agitation which Soviet im-
perialism may maintain in Cuba or
in any other place in America."
The presidents said the interior
ministers meeting would be held
early in April to "put into imme-
diate effect common measures to

11

,...I

restrict the movement of their
nationals to and from Cuba and
the flow of material propaganda
and funds from that country."
Informed sources said the meet-
ing may be held in Managua, Nic-
aragua.
While the presidents were de-
bating on Cuba, their foreign min-
isters approved the draft of a
statement on an economic inte-
gration program for the six-nation
group that lies between Colombia
and Mexico.
The six were reported to have
pressed for a larger aid program
than that which had been pre-
pared for the conference by their
economic ministers and United
States aid officials.
The Central American economic
ministers estimated at a meeting
last month in Tegucigalpa, capital
of Honduras, that they need $200
million for economic and social
development.
The Central American economic
ministers estimated at a meeting
last month in Tegucigalpa, capi-
tal of Honduras, that they needed
$200 million for economic and
social development.

WASHINGTON-The Kennedy
administration plans to slice about
$200 million off its foreign aid
requests after it receives a con-
troversial report from a special
committee headed by Gen. Lucius
D. Clay.
* * s
NEW YORK - The National
Farmers Union, ignoring attacks
on federal farm aid programs,
called yesterday for broader use
of government paymentsrto as-
sure the nation's farmers fair
prices.
WASHINGTON - Sen. Albert
Gore (D-Tenn) set the stage yes-
terday for a fight against con-
firmation of incorporators for the
new Communications Satellite
Corporation similar to that waged
against the bill to establish the
firm.
WASHINGTON - Republican
congressional leaders threatened
yesterday to oppose an increase in
the debt limit as a step toward
forcing cuts in spending.
HAVANA-The newspaper Rev-
olution said yesterday President
John F. Kennedy's speech at the
San Jose Conference Monday
"confirms intentions of aggression
against the people of Cuba."
WASHINGTON-News industry
leaders told Congress yesterday the
Kennedy administration has lied
to Americans in times of cold war
crisis. They said this undermined
the people's faith in what the gov-
ernment says and demanded a
guarantee that it won't happen
again.
NEW YORK-The New York
Stock Exchange went through an-
other session of slow decline yes-
terday. The Dow Jones Averages
showed 30 industrials down 1.25;
15 rails down .49; 15 Utilities
down .46; 65 Stocks down .65.

Britain Tries To Patch
Rift in Western Alliance
PARIS M)--Britain made a bid last night for peace with French
President Charles de Gaulle despite France's veto.of British entry into
the European Common Market.'
The avowed British government aim is to patch the rift in West-
ern unity within the North Atlantic Treaty Organization setup, notably

TONIGHT Lecture I I I in series of five on
"Contemporary Literature and the Christian Faith"
by eminent educators brought to Ann Arbor
by the First Presbyterian Church
and Campus Center
THE NOVELIST AS
PREACHER AND PROPHET
CHAD WALSH, Chairman
English Department, Beloit College
7:30 P.M. First Presbyterian Church
ADMISSION FREE 1432 Washtenaw Ave.

Book Air

Space

for Spring Vacation
NOW!

a Conin 7ra ie1 lo
NEAR MUD BOWL

5-9151

(the agency anxious to help the student)

IA

r. .

on nuclear matters.
Foreign Secretary Lord Home flea
arrival statement singled out France a
bers of NATO. But the French-
appeared cool.
Lord Home came specifically for
a meeting today of, the NATO
Council. His mission appeared
mainly to smooth away differences
within the alliance.
De Gaulle, in blackballing Brit-
ain from the trade bloc, also has
shown a determination to end the
long United States domination of
NATO.
"I have come to discuss with our
friends and allies in the NATO
council, in which France is one of
the most valued members, a possi-
ble nuclear deterrent for the alli-
ance," Lord Home told newsmen.
The British foreign secretary
said he understood there is some
desire within NATO for more em-
phasis on the European role in
the alliance.
Lord Home said he would make
concrete proposals today that
would contribute to that concept.
He said they would concern a
NATO nuclear deterrent which
could be developed at the NATO
foreign ministers' meeting in Ot-
tawa in May.
UI

w here from London and in an
as one of the most valued mem-

i

I

El

U-M Concert Dance Organization 13th Annual Spring
Dance Concert
MODERN
and FRI., MAR. 22--SAT., MAR. 23-8 P.M.
BALLET Special Matinee Saturday 2:30 with
Interlochen Music Academy Dance Students
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre $1.25 eves., $1 mat.
All seats reserved * On Sale Now at Theatre Box Office
AN ACTIVITY OF THE CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
FEELING H UNGRY LATELY?

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How 'bout a Pretzel?

Get them at

Fishbowl ... Diag . .

Engine Arch

Sponsored by Delta Phi Epsilon
Proceeds to CYSTIC FIBROSIS

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THE MICHIGAN UNION

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

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