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March 13, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILYE M

VEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1963

:anham Looking To Spring;
or goes Indoor Invitations

WIN NO EVENTS:
Depth, Balance Give Tankers Second

men, and they could get help from
Fred Lambert, a big sophomore
from Milburn, N. J.
Another Source
Another source of improvement
could be Jay Sampson, a regular
on the two-mile relay last year,
but out with a foot injury so far
this year.
Canham has good reason to look
ahead to the outdoor season.
Michigan went without a first or
second place Saturday at the US-
TFF meet, run on a short board
track with 11 laps to the mile in-
stead of the customary 8.
Canham pointed out that the
team was tired from the bus ride
to Milwaukee and that it had
little experience running on
boards, but he found only three
men to praise.
Dave Hayes beat Big Ten cham-
pion Gary Fischer, of Iowa, in
placing third in the mile in 4:13;
Al Ammerman cleared 6'6" in the
high jump for the second straight
meet and just missed at 6'8"; and
Charlie Aquino placed fourth in
the 1000-yd. run in 2:10.5.

By BOB ZWINCK
Swimming mentor Gus Stager is
not really very fussy about how
many first places his team takes
as long as they finish first-
behind Indiana.
In.the Big Ten swimming meet
at Lafayette last weekend the
Hoosiers collected nine, leaving
eight to sprinkle around amongst
the other teams. Minnesota
snatched up six of these, setting
at .least one record in each event.
SPORTS SHORTS:
Pick N-LCAA
'Ice Slate
By The Associated Press
BOSTON - Pairings were an-
nounced yesterday for the open-
ing round of the NCAA Hockey
Tournament with host Boston
College paired with North Dakota
Thursday night and Clarkson
meeting Denver Friday.
The final will be played Satur-
day night, after an afternoon
consolation game between the
first-round losers.
Fontinato Finished
MONTREAL-Coach Toe Blake
of the Montreal Canadiens said
yesterday it will be a miracle if
injured defenseman Lou Fontin-
ato plays hockey again.
"What can you expect?" said
Blake. "He has broken bones in
the neck, and I've known players
with injuries not half as serious
that had to quit."
Fontinato was checked head-
long into the boards Saturday
night by Vic Hadfield of the New
York Rangers. He was carried in
a state of paralysis from the rink,
and doctors later said the cervi-
cal, vertebrae at the base of the
neck were crushed and partially
dislocated.
* * *

Michigan State and Ohio State
split the other two.
So how do the Wolverines get
second place? By plucking a pair
of seconds, three thirds, and a
wholeY carload of fourth-through-
eighth place finishes. Although
that in itself is no mean task, it
can be accomplished when a team
without stars has both depth and
balance.
Anxious Moments
Stager still had his anxious
moments, and some disappointing
ones. "That's awful. They do a
real good job in the qualifying
heats and then mess it up with
slower times in the finals," he re-
marked after that pattern had be-
come apparent in the first day's
events. But as the pattern reversed
itself with increasingly regularity,
he became more concerned about
the races still coming up and
whether Minnesota would overtake
his team.
Michigan had 40 individual en-
tries and two relays. They were not
shut out in any event, though
they sort of locked themselves out

in the medley relay when one
man took off before the touch was
made. One other swimmer was dis-
qualified for failing to touch on
the turn and only two failed to
place in the top 12 (both of these
were ranked 13th). So 38 entries
earned points, a feat matched by
none save Indiana.
Two Seconds
Sophomore backstroker Ed Bar-
tsch and senior breaststroker Dick
Nelson came through with the two
seconds for the Blue tankers.
Bartsch swam the 200-yd. back-
stroke in 2:00.8 to push Hoosier
Tom Stock to a new NCAA record
time of 1:56.9. At the 100-yd.
distance, Bartsch picked up a third
to nip defending champion L. B.
Schaefer of Ohio State.
Nelson was runner-up in the
100-yd. breaststroke, finishing
about a yard behind Chet Jas-
tremski in 1:01.5. He also added
a fifth place at 200-yds.
Frank Berry surprised everyone
as he took third for the Wolverines
in the 200-yd. freestyle. He turned
in his best time of 1:48.8 and even

edged out Michigan State's Mike the Big Tens this year. He also
Wood, who set an NCAA record at added a sixth in the 200-yd. I-M
that distance just two weeks ago. and a seventh in the 100-yd. but-
Other Third terfly.
Tom Dudley contributed the Third Best
other third place in the 1650-yd. The third best point-getter, be-
freestyle. This event was length- hind Reppert and Bartsch, was
ened about ten yds. from last Jeff Longstreth. He picked up his
year's 1500 meters so that the race points in three events, coo. He
would not end near the middle of gathered two seventh-place fin-
the pool. This was Dudley's first ishes in the 400-yd. individual
crack at the 1650. His time was medley and the 200-yd. outterfly
18:19.6. He also turned in a fifth and placed fourth in the 100-yd.
in the 500-yd. freestyle. butterfly. He also swam the third
But the best indication of the leg of the medley which was ds-
team's depth is shown in that the qualified.
individual scoring the most points Taking second in the Big Ten
for the Wolverines didn't even only on depth and balance is one
place as high as third in any thing, but in the NCAA's coming
event. Lanny Reppert picked an up in just over two weeks only
even dozen team points. six places are counted, with 7-5-
He finished fourth in the 400 yd. 4-3-2-1 scoring. A high finish may
individual medley, a new event in be considerably harder to come by.
KTTENTION A FFI IA TES]

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II

E

KEN BURNLEY DAVE HAYES
... another look ... beats conference champ

Colt Owner Accused
Of Bet AgainstTeam

McLaney of Miami Beach, stated
that he joined Rosenbloom in a
$55,000 bet against the Colts in
a game with the Pittsburgh
Steelers.
Doyle then told Judge George
C. Young that the Colts did not
play the Steelers in 1953. McLa-
ney's attorney, Benjamin Schul-
man of Miami Beach, replied that
McLaney had intended to say that
it was a game between the Colts
and the San Francisco 49ers.
McLaney, former operator of a
Havana -gambling casino during'
the Batista regime, and three
other persons made depositions in
a 1960 suit against Rosenbloom
charging him v'ith breach of con-
tract in a stock deal.
Federal Judge Joseph P. Lieb
dismissed the suit and ordered the
record sealed, on grounds that re-
vealing the contents of the depo-
sitions would humiliate and em-
barrass Rosenbloom.
In the suit heard Tuesday,
Rosenbloom asked that the four
persons who made the depositions
be held in contempt of court, be-
cause the information was releas-
ed to Pete Rozelle, National Foot-
ball League commissioner.
Exhibition
Baseball

Zepbs to Baltimore
CHICAGO - General Manager
Frank Lane said last night the
chances are "99 out of 100" that
the Chicago Zephyrs will move to
Baltimore for the 1963-64 Na-
tional Basketball Association sea-
son.
But Lane added that un ier no
circumstances will he stay with
the club if they make the move.
He made his remarks following
an announcement that no official
statement will be made until the
season ends in Chicago Saturday
night.
Clay Faces
Biggest Test
NEW YORK (P)-Cassius Clay
faces the severest test of his brief
but spectacular boxing career to-
night when he takes on dead-
panned, strong-jawedsDoug Jones
before a capacity crowd at Madi-
son Square Garden.
The all-conquering, 21-year-old
Louisville Lip is a 13-5 to 3-1
choice to make the 26-year-old
New York heavyweight contender
his 18th straight victim in the 10-
rounder.
"They all must fall in the round
I call," trumpets brash Cassius.
He first predicted Jones would fall
in six but has since warned the
unawed Jones he must go in four.
"N. Y. TIMES"
Says of
Bonnie Dobson
". ingratiating, honesty
and warmth."

Il

(At least it's time to
start thinking about it)
Golf SWEATf RS!
Alpaca Knit $18.95
Orlon Cardigan $13.95

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11111 R 1 i i 1 i i t i R 11R i iiR 111 i" \R \\ R\\ R i\ i 1 R 1' ti 11 i i t Ilk

711 N. UNIVERSITY

GOLF JACKETS
Barracuda and
Nylon Slip Overs $9.95
Gary Player $10.95
H AROLD S. TRICKP
902 S. STATE

Milwaukee 5, New York (A) 0
Pittsburgh 7, Washington 6
Los Angeles (N) 4, St. Louis 3
Philadelphia 12, Cincinnati 6
Kansas City 7, Minnesota 4
Chicago (A) 3, New York (N) 1
Houston 6, Chicago (N) 5
Los Angeles (A) 6, Cleveland 1
San Francisco 4, Boston 1
Baltimore 7, Detroit 2

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MATH EMATICIANS
Technical representatives
of the MITRE Corporation
will be conducting interviews
on campus
March 14

PHYSICISTS

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AN OPPORTUNITY TO GROW
IN THE HIGiEST PROFESSIONAL
WORKING ENVIRONMENT
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS

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ALL CAMPUS SPRING ELECTIONS
REFERENDUM

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MITRE designs and develops systems that enable our mili-
tary commanders to detect attack and retaliate instantly.
Typical systems include Nuclear Detection and Reporting
Systems, North American Air Defense Combat Operations
Center, and Back Up Interceptor Center. MITRE is also
experimenting with techniques for future air traffic con-
trol systems.
For the young systems engineer there is no more rewarding
work. You associate with the top men in your field. You
work in an atmosphere that allows you to extend your
capabilities professionally and academically.
At MITRE, men trained in single disciplines are encour-
aged to grow beyond their original fields of interest. Systems
designers learn to work from an increasingly broad base.
You may work in such diverse areas as information
theory, computer design, display techniques, propagation,
or human engineering. You may analyze. You may syn-
thesize. You may deal with systems or individual compo-
nents. At the highest levels, you may have to consider
political, economic and social factors ... as well as the
available and predictable technology.
Requirements, B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. in these disciplines -
electronics, physics, and mathematics. MITRE is located in
pleasant, suburban Boston. If an interview will be incon-
venient, inquiries may be directed in confidence to Vice
President - Technical Operations, e MITRE Corpora-
tion, Box 208, Dept.UMD 3Bedford; Mass.
MITRE, an independent nonprofit corporation, working
with - not in competition with - industry, serves as tech-
nical advisor to the Air Force Electronic Systems Division,

POLLS
OPEN: 8 A.M. to 5:15 P.M.
LOCATION: Frieze Build., Palmer
Field. Markley, East Med., Diag,

ELECTIONS FOR,
Student Government Council
Union Board of Directors.
Board in Control of
qt lAont l jh ;rnin

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