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March 08, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

French Miners
Continue Strike,
Factories ClIose
PARIS (W)-Union resistance stiffened yesterday as a nationwide
strike of France's nationalized coal industry moved toward crisis stage.
Some factories closed for lack of fuel; others reported they were
operating on emergency reserves.
The three major unions representing 200,000 coal miners ordered
continuation of the strike for better wages and shorter hours despite
a government plea to return to the pits. The strike began last Friday.
tThere were signs of growing labor,

unrest in other sectors of the econ-
omy as support for the miners
built up among other unions.
This was the first major head
on clash between French Presi-
dent Charles de Gaulle's govern-
ment and France's organized labor
bloc. At stake was the govern-
ment's prestige.
The coal mine unions demand
an 11 per cent wage boost and a
work week cut from 46 to 40 hours.
The government has offered the
miners a 5.7 per cent wage increase
spread out over the next year.
Demand Negotiations
Strike leaders say the / miners
will not go back to the pits until
the government at least opens
negotiations on the demands. The
government says it will not dis-
cuss wages and hours until' the
miners go back to work.
Gas and electricity workers call-
ed for a two-hour sympathy strike
this morning. Workers In the big
Lacq gas fields in southwestern
France shut down yesterday for.
what was announced as a two-
day strike. The gas workers want
their salaries upgraded and a
fourth week of paid holidays each
year.
Speed Not Expected
In the eastern Lorraine basin,
the unified strike committee serv-
ed notice the miners do not expect
a quick settlement. The. committee
invited mayors of several towns in
the area to attend a meeting on
the strike in Merlebach March 12.
Premier Georges Pompidou will
make what his office called a
fireside chat to the nation over
radio and television tonight to
explain the government's position.

Congress
Discusses
Insplection
WASHINGTON (P)-Amid loud
political overtones, Congress dug
deeper yesterday into the tech-
niques for detecting secret under-
ground nuclear weapons tests.
The Senate-House Committee on
Atomic Energy was told that low-
level explosionO might be hidden
even with on-site inspection.
Meanwhile, Ser. Barry Gold-
water (R-Ariz) urged in the Sen-
ate that the United States with-
draw its negotiators from the test-
ban talks at Geneva.
The Arizonaconservative said
that the negotiators should come
home and the nation should "get
on with the job of keeping Ameri-
ca strong."
President John F. Kennedy re-
iterated at his news conference
Wednesday that he would accept
no test-ban treaty without ade-
quate inspection provisions.
But while Goldwater kept up
the attack Sen. Thomas J. Dodd
(D-Conn), another senatorial crit-
ic of the administration's test-ban
policies, praised what he called the
President's "categorical assurance"
there will be no test-ban treaty
"that allows the possibility of un-
detected Soviet cheating."
Theodore A. George, engineer for
the Defense Department's Advanc-
ed Research Projects Agency, told
the committee that on-site inspec-
tion is a chain operation and that
by careful planning a cheater
might hide a low-level shot even
from on-site inspection.
Prime trace of a nuclear ex-
plosion would be a crater or other
surface soil disturbance.
Orlebeke Reveals
Committee Plans
Special To The Daily
LANSING-Appointments and a
general mandate for Gov. George
Romney's non-partisan, statewide
education study committee will be
made within 10 days, Charles Or-
lebeke, a Romney aide who ana-
lyzes matters dealing with edu-
cation, announced yesterday.

SENATE HEARING:
LeMay Cites Bombers
As Dominant Weapons
WASHINGTON (M)-Air Force Gen. Curtis E. LeMay told sena-
tors yesterday that the "manned bomber is still the dominant long-_
range weapons system" even though the Soviets now stress ballistic
missiles.
To meet the expanding Soviet military threat, the general said,
this nation must maintain "a collective strength of mixed forces,
manned and missile." In somewhat more forthright terms he second-
*ed a cautious appeal from Secre-
tary of the Air Rorce Eugene M.
Zuckert for continued development
of manned aircraft.

CHARLES DE GAULLE
.. challenged
SIX PER CENT:
Department
INotes. rrise
In Jobless
WASHINGTON (AP)-Unemploy-
ment has climbed back to more.
than six per cent of the work
force, it was announced yesterday
amid new appeals that Congress
quickly cut taxes to stimulate the
economy.
The Labor Department reported
that unemployment rose unexpect-
edl§ February by 246,000 to 4,-
9 18,000, a figure nearly 400,000
higher than in February, 1962.
Employment continued its grad-
ual rise to new record levels, in-
creasing by 423,000to- 66,358,000,
highest February job total so far.
The seasonally adjusted idle
rate, which had risen from 5.6
per cent of the work force in
December to 5.8 per cent in Janu-
ary, rose to 6.1 per cent in Febru-
ary-the highest rate since No-
vember, 1961.
Secretary of Labor W. Willard
Wirtz said "These facts indicate
that while there are no signs of
a general recession, the growth of
jobs has not kept pace with the
increase in the labor force. Our
economy is simply not expanding
fast enough ... it must do so if we
are to avoid an economic down-
turn."
The February unemployment
increase was equally divided be-
tween adult men and teen-agers.
The idle rate for adult men moved
ulp to 5.1 per cent and for teen-
agers to 15.6 per cent.
Set onstitution
TO Reaffirm
Tito s Position
BELGRADE (A) - Yugoslavian
President Joseph B. Tito and the
Communist;Party would remain
firmly in control under the terms
of a new draft constitution adopt-
ed by a special commission and
submitted yesterday to Parlia-
ment.
The new constitution reaffirms
Yugoslavia's brand of decentraliz-
ed socialism which brought ideol-
ogical disputes with the Soviet
Union.
The major structural change
would be introduction of a prime
minister, under President Tito,
with the title of president of the
federal executive council or cab-
inet.
Under the new constitution Yu-
goslavia would have a vice-presi-
dent. He would act for the presi-
dent when needed and would serve
for an electoral period of four
years.

CURTIS LeMAY
... supports bombers
McGHEE:
Envoy Set
By Kennedy
WASHINGTON ()P) - President
John F. Kennedy has picked
George Crews McGhee as the next
United States ambassador to West
Germany, it was learned yester-
day.
McGhee, who has.been Kenne-
dy's undersecretary of state for
political affairs, is slated to suc-
ceed career diplomat Walter C.
Dowling, who underwent surgery
in New York yesterday for a kid-
ney ailment.

Johnson Cites Role of Media

Closed Hearings
LeMay testified with Zuckert
in a closed-door hearing of the
Senate Armed Services Committee.
The committee is considering the
Air Force share of the new $55
billion defense budget.
LeMay stated the opinion that
overpowering U.S. nuclear and air
strength and on obvious deter-
mination to use it is necessary,
forced removal. of Soviet missiles
and bombers from Cuba last Oc-
tober.
LeMay said the United States
must be able to destroy not only
enemy cities but an enemy mili-
tary force if a general or nuclear
war develops.
"It doesn't take much of a nu-
clear force to destroy a large num-
ber of enemy cities. But the de-
struction of cities per se does not
protect United States and allied
lives."
LeMay's obvious point was that
a manned strategic system able to
make selective and repeated pene-
trations is necessary to maintain
deterrent power.
'Highest Readiness'
"The Air Force is in the highest
state of peacetime readiness in its
history," Zuckert told the com-
mittee, and then added:
"Beyond the immediate future,
the picture is not as clear as we
would like it to be."
Zuckert said this country must
build "a defense capability in
space" which could deny "to a
hostile power the uninhibited mili-
tary exploitation of space," and
provide "a system of protection for
United States scientific activities
in space."

By ROBERT SELWA
First of a two-part series
With the focus turning on the
underdeveloped nations, it can be
asked: what is and what should be
the role of the mass media in
their development?
Rev. James L. Johnson, '63, a
missionary to Nigeria for three
years and former editor of Afri-
can Challenge Magazine during i
that period, suggests an answer.
"The mass media should show
the people how they can better
themselves," Johnson, a journal-
ism major, emphasizes.
Spiritual Values
This was what African Chal-
lenge tried to do. While it provid-
ed the means for communication
of spiritual values, it also com-
bined with that some material
help, Johnson said. He cited an
article on how to get a job, one
of the most appreciated items to
appear in Challenge because it
emphasized the fundamentally im-
portant guidance that individuals
in Nigeria need.
Some of the biggest responses
were to Challenge's health articles,
Johnson continued. All the schools
bought and distributed the maga-
zine the month that it dramatized
"The War Within" the 'human
body, an article that pointed out
the benefits of an improved diet.
As to the Christian values that
Challenge communicated, Niger-
ians responded to these with as
much appreciation as to the secu-
lar material. This proves, Johnson
said, that the Christian philoso-
phy is not wholly irrelevant in
foreign territories as some critics
have people believe.
Journalists in the underdevel-
oped countries should teach the
people, should help them, like the
Peace Corps, in achieving eco-
nomic progress, health, educa-

I

d

I

World News Roundup'
By The Associated Press
DAMASCUS-Yemen's revolutionary regime claimed a crucial
victory yesterday over monarchists fighting to regain power. It an-
nounced the fall of the monarchist stronghold of Harib, saying this
put every bit of Yemen under Republican control.
* . * *
HAWAII-The Hawaii legislature recently ratified the 24th amend-
ment to the United States Constitution. It would prohibit state poll
taxes.
WASHINGTON-The Army soon will equip its units in Europe
with their first Sergeant missiles, a rugged weapon more compact and
and accurate and quicker to fire than the Corporal missile it will
replace.
* * * *
LONDON-The Russians were accused last night of trying to

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blackmail a British embassy employe
eign office spokesman said Soviet'"
intelligence agents approached
Ivor Rowsell, 47, embassy transport
officer, 13 days ago and threaten-
ed to disclose what they called
an incident in his private life un-
less he worked for the Soviet Un-
ion. No further details were given.
* * *
MADRID-The Franco govern-
ment is said to be annoyed about
Juan D. Peron's recent political
activities here, but a Spanish
spokesman denied yesterday that
the Argentine ex-dictator will be
asked to leave his exile home.
$ 4.'''' *"''m.
DAMASCUS-The Syrian dele-
gation to the United Nations has
been instructed to protect "seri-
ously mounting tension" along the
70-mile Syria-Israel armistice line.
The Syrian foreign ministry said -
complaints of alleged Israeli at-
tacks would be made to Secretary-
General U Thant and to the Se-
curity Council.
LOS ANGELES-A device de-
signed to alter light beams so they
can return television pictures from
far-ranging spacecraft was dis-
closed yesterday by North Ameri-
can Aviation, Inc. The device, call-
ed a Laser Modulator, breaks up
light into signals that can be
transmitted over greater distances
than radio waves can span.

in Moscow into spying. A for-II

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Last Times Tonight at 7 and 9
ELIZABETH TAYLOR in
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CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF
(COLOR)

1 1.

1111

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