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March 01, 1963 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

F WAY, MARCH 1,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY * FRIDAY. MAR*JH I

. __.... _ , . ._s,.,., _ .

Rugged Harris Winding Up Home Career

1

Conference Leaders Grapple

By TOM ROWLAND

1

possesses a balanced team with
depth and strength in every posi-
tion. Michigan Coach Cliff Keen
has his deepest team in at least
three years. The Wolverines hate
strength in every position, and an-
other man to fill in if one gets
hurt or has to move down a weight.
At 123-lbs. Keen has been alter-
nating Ralph Bahna and Carl
Rhodes. Bahna has a losing rec-
ord but has fully recovered from
a knee injury and has shown quick
moves in his last two starts. In
the Indiana meet two weeks ago,
Bahna got his first collegiate pin.
Improving Soph
At 130-lbs. the Wolverines have
Dave Dozeman, an improving
sophomore, and Captain Nick Ar-
melagos. Gary Wilcox, who appears
even now to be a threat to Huff,
is at 137-lbs. Wilcox just returned
this semester after missing a se-
mester and no opponent has come
close to him. His three wins were:
a pin against Wisconsin, an 8-2
win against Indiana, and a 11-6
verdict against the Spartans.
At 147-lbs. Michigan has either
Lee Deitrick or Jim Keen. Deitrick
is ailing from a.pinched nerve in
his shoulder but as a sophomore
has chalked up many impressive
wins including a first place in the
Wilkes Tournament.
At 157-lbs. there is Rick Bay or
Wayne Miller. Bay has lost once
this season while Miller has a sol-
id winning record. Chris Stowell,
at 167-lbs., has looked quite im-
pressive on the home mats, pin-
ning three of his five opponents.
At 177-lbs. there is either Stowell
or Joe Arcure or Jack Barden.
And, finally at heavyweight,
Keen has Barden or Bob Spaly.
Barden looms as the Big Ten
Champion with an unblemished
record save for a tie against Mich-
igan State's massive Homer Mc-
Clure. The Wolverine heavyman
has two really impressive wins
against his nemises, Northwestern's
Al Jaklich and pinning Wiscon-
sin's Roger Pillath, the defending
Big Ten Champion.

"B.J." bows out before the home
fans Saturday.
It will be the close of two quick
years for Michigan when John
Harris, with the same dead-pan
expression on his face that belies
a fantastic jumping talent and a
locker-full of basketball purple
hearts, makes his Yost Field House
finale against Illinois.
The 6'5", 200-lb. senior. has had
all the bad breaks this winter, get-
ting well-acquainted with Michi-
gan's training room after a string
of injuries kept him well-hamp-
ered throughout most of the sea-
son.
Says Big John: "It's just that---
tough luck." Then with a shrug,
"Things just happen that way."
Things have happened that have
made it an up-and-down final
season for Harris, who moved over
to forward this winter after a
junior year at center to make
room for Bill Buntin.
Slow Start
"At the beginning of the sea-
son I really had trouble getting
started," says Harris. "It was the
first time I'd played at forward-
it took some time to get adjusted,
but after a while I felt I was
playing a lot better. I had two
real good games down in the Hous-
ton Classic, and the Evansville
game just before that was one of
my best this year."
At Evansville "B.J." popped in
20 points, and down in Texas the
Wolverine forward's play had him
named to the all-tournament team.
It was against fouston that Har-
ris' free throws in the fourth over-
Last Chance
Michigan gymnastics fans
have their last chance to see,
the gym team in action tonight
at 7:30.in the Intramural Bldg.
The intrasquad meet will fea-
ture an exhibition by Wilhelm
Weiler, Canada's top Pan-
American Games gymnast.
Admission is free.

I

JOHN HARRIS
... home finale

time period squeaked Michigan to
a 90-88 win.
"But then when I hurt that right
ankle against Yale I got into trou-
ble," the lanky star goes on. "Be-
cause of those strained ligaments
I started putting more pressure on
the other foot and twisted up that
left ankle. Ever since then I just
haven't been able to get back into
stride-my shooting's been .way
off."
Harris mis-landed on his left
foot while going up for a rebound
against Indiana, and his depar-
ture from the game brought on a
standing ovation from packed Yost
Field House. And down at Purdue
last weekend the Michigan senior
caught an elbow in the cheek that
left his numbed face in poor shape.
Buntin Arrives
Buntin's arrival on the Michigan
scene pushed Harris out of the
limelight at center, where he was
the Big Ten's shortest pivotman
last season. "Bill's doing a great
job--a better job than I did last
year," comments John.
"I feel better playing at center,
though. At forward you don't get
as many shots, and at center all
the action is coming to you in-
stead of you to it."

A veteran of high school ball in
Leland, Miss., where he was an
all-state selection his senior year,
Harris transferred to Michigan
after a year at Alcorn College.
"I always wanted to go to a Big
Ten school," he says, "but I never
thought I'd have the chance."
Jumping right into the starting
line-up last year, Harris swished
17 points in his first game and
ended the season with a 12 points
a game average.
Calm John
About that stone-faced expres-
sion that never changes, be the
lead 30 or one: "Well, I try to keep
calm because I play my best ball
that way. The expression? I guess
it's just something I've acquired."
Harris was thinking of trying
for the American Basketball
League before it folded recently.
"I was interested in the ABL-
that was at the beginning of the
season when I was doing better. I
still believe I could make it in the
league. These injuries are slowing
me down now, but I'm sure I could
get over them. This is the first
time that injuries have kept me
out of the lineup."
The big forward will be physical-
ly in one piece for the Illinois
game Saturday. "They've got a
great team, winning mostly on
their shooting. I think we're
stronger on the boards than they
are-we really want to beat 'em."
If Michigan does top the Illini
it'll be a big break for Ohio State,
currently deadlocked with Illinois
for the top Big Ten spot. Says
Harris: "I think I'd rather see
Illinois go to the NCAA's because
they've got the better team. Of
course, I'd never let that affect
my play on the floor. We're just
out to win regardless of who we're
playing."
Harris contends that basketball
is really on the upswing at Michi-
gan. "I feel that it needs more
emphasis and even maybe a new
field house." The dirt get in your
eyes, John? "Well, actually our
floor is as good as anybody's we
play on. But from the spectator
aspect-and especially in recruit-
ing new players-it sure would
help."
"I think the people here are
definitely more football-conscious.
Of course, last fall's team didn't
hurt boosting basketball around
here."

UP FOR TWO-John Harris goes high in the air for a two-
pointer against Iowa last Monday night. The 6'5" senior makes
his last home performance against Illinois this Saturday, cur-
rently scoring 8.8 points a game. That's Michigan center Bill
Buntin under the basket.
BRADDS MAKES FIRST TEAM:
er
Duke's Heyman' Leads
Al-meiaSelections

r i

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Art Heyman of
Duke, Ron Bonham of Cincinnati
and Jerry Harkness of Chicago
Loyola, whose exploits helped their
teamstonational ranking, top, the
1963 basketball All-America an-
nounced yesterday by The Associ-
ated Press..
Rounding out the first team are
Gary Bradds of Ohio State and
Barry Kramer of New York Uni-

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versity. Heyman and Harkness are
seniors, Bonham, Bradds and Kra-
mer juniors.
Two seniors, Rod Thorn of West
Virginia and Tom Thacker of Cin-
cinnati, two juniors, Cotton Nash
of Kentucky and Walt Hazzard of
UCLA, and, Princeton's star sopho?
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second team.
The third team is comprised of
Nick Werkman, Seton Hall junior,
and four seniors, Tony Yates of
Cincinnati, Bill Green of -Colorado
State, Eddie Miles of Seattle and
Jimmy Rayl of Indiana.
Mel Counts of Oregon State,
Gen Charlton of Colorado, Jeff
Mullins of Duke, Paul Siles of
Creighton and Joe Caldwell of
Arizona State head the honorable
mention list. The list also includes
George Wilson of Cincinnati, Mack
Herndon of Bradley, Dave Stall-
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Illinois and Nate Thurmond of
Bowling Green.
The 6'S" Heyman, from Rock-
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Duke Blue Devils to an unbeaten
record in regular season play in
the Atlantic Coast Conference. He
topped the voting by 183 sports
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On the basis of five points for
a first team vote and two points
for a second team nod, Heyman
polled 142 firsts and 744 points al-
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hot shooting helped Cincinnati's
National Collegiate champions to
another Missouri Valley Confer-
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voting with 132 firsts and 706
points.
Harkness, a "small" 6'2" who
sparked Loyola to 21 straight vic-
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428 points comfortably ahead of
the 6'8" Bradds and the 6'4" Kra-
mer.
The voting was very close after
the top three with Bradds, Kra-
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on the next level with Rayl get-
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Yates 124 and Counts 118.

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