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February 14, 1963 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14,

Late Politicians Protest Olympic Rule

FACE CHAMP HOLMES:
Illini To Challenge Tumblers

nagh for creation of a joint state-
city board to build an Olympic
Stadium at the State Fairgrounds
in Detroit.
Rush Proposal
The council wasted no time in
approving the Cavanagh sugges-
tion and rushed a copy of the
proposal 80 miles by police -car
to Lansing so it could be intro-
duced in the state Legislature in
a hurry.
Rep. Michael O'Brien (D-
Detroit), who sponsored the "tate
legislative proposal, said it was
a prerequisite to getting federal
aid in building a proposed 100,000-
seat stadium and other Olympic
buildings.
Committee Named
The Legislature named a special
six-man committee to work with
other groups trying to get the
games for Detroit.
Fred Matthaei, a Regent from

3 Days
Only

Detroit and for many years lead-
er of efforts to get the Olympic
Games for Detroit, said he was
"bitterly disappointed" at the ac-
tion of the executive committee
of the USOC which threw the
bidding open again to all cities
which had made bids for the
games. ,
Legal Threat
"I'm sure the executive corn-
mittee acted under threat of legal
action by Los Angeles," he said,
adding, "It's unheard of in am-
ateur sports to make a move like
this."
The latest protest, filed by the
Michigan Chamber of Commerce,
charged that the decision was "un-
justified, unfair, ungainly, un-
reasonable and unseemly."
Hall Telegrams
In a telegram to Kenneth L.
Wilson, president of the U.S.
Olympic Committee, the chamber's
executive vice-president, Harry
Hall, said, "We do not intend to
LA. Officials
Form Group
For Olympics
LOS ANGELES R) - The Los
Angeles County Board of Super-
visors announced Wednesday the
formation of a committee of 100
citizens to help bring the 1968
Olympic Games here.
Jamie H. Smith, chairman of
the California Fish and Game
Commission, agreed to head the
new committee, which is being
made up of sports and civic lead-
ers named by the state, city and
county.
Acts as Secretary
Supervisor Kenneth Hahan of
Los Angeles said he believes this
city will win out over Detroit in
getting permission to extend this
nation's bid for the games.
"These games represent $100
million in business and world
prestige which cannot be match-
ed," said Hahan.

accept your rude rejection with
lethargy and acquiescence."
The Detroit committee said it
"regrets that the U.S. Olympic
Committee's executive committee
has taken such hasty and ill ad-
vised action in reopening the
award of the U.S. site for the
1968 games."
Gov. Romney accused California
and Gov. Edmund G. (Pat) Brown
of trying to rob Detroit of its
candidacy.
Brown Replies
Gov. Brown said California isn't
trying to rob Detroit of a chance
to host the games, but he conced-
ed to newsmen that "I'm trying
to take this away in a fair coh-
test."
Arthur Lentz, assistant execu-
tive director of the U.S. Olympic
Committee emphasized that the
executive committee could only
make a recommendation and that
the full board of directors may or
may not act upon it.
Another Vote
However, Doug Roby, a Detroit-
r -who is vice-president of the
USOC. said it wAr almost certain
that the 42-man board of directors
would take another vote' on the
matter.
Wrestling Meet . .
The wrestling meet Friday
afternoon with Wisconsin at
4 p.m. will be held on the
main floor of the Sports Build-
ing instead of Yost Field
House.
Saturday's wrestling meet
with Indiana is still scheduled
for the Field House at 4 p.m.
after the Ohio State basket-
ball game. The gymnastics
meet, also Saturday afternoon,1
will start at 3:30 p.m. at the
Sports Building.
Other cities submitting bids to
represent the U.S. in the interna-
tional bidding were San Francisco,
Philadelphia and Portland, Ore.
Besides the U.S. entry, cities in
the international bidding wIll be
Lausanne, Switzerland; Lyons,
France, Vienna, Mexico City and
Buenos Aires.

By DAVE BLOCK
The Michigan gymnastics team
will entertain a fading Illinois
squad this Saturday at 3:30 p.m.'
in the Intramural Building gym.'
The Wolverines hope to repeat!
their decisive 75-36 victory of last;
week over Ohio State.
The sole bright spot for Illinois'
is senior tumbler Hal Holmes, the
.ndisputed Big Ten champion for
the past two years and the current
national AAU titleholder in his
event. Holmes' achievements have
led Michigan coach Newt Loken
to describe him as "the greatest
tumbler in the universe."
Pick a Pair
However, the success of Mich-
igan's gym team this year can be
attributed in part to the fine per-
formances of its own tumbling
squad. Junior Phil Bolton and
sophomore Mike Henderson have
been outstanding in placing first

GEORGE ROMNEY
... protests action

Upsets and Losses
Even Big Ten Race

and second, respectively, in every
dual meet to date.
Henderson, while attending the
Georgia Military Academy in At-
lanta, won his state's high school
all-around championship for two
consecutive years. His tumbling
routine now includes such diffi-
cult stunts as a double twist and
a double backflip.
This latter, according to Loken,
is currently being performed in
the Big Ten exclusively by him,
Bolton, and Holmes.
Floor Exercise, Too
Henderson also competes in
floor exercise, and speaking of
the two events he says, "They're
so different, you can't compare
their difficulty; however, I like
them both equally."
Bolton has been described as
a student of the art of tumbling.
His faithful week-in-week-out
work during practice sessions has
been rewarded by the addition of
a double back flip into his rou-1
tine.
A further example of Bolton's
devotion to tumbling is the fact
that he presents his finest per-
formances under pressure, where-
as many gymnasts who work their
events flawlessly in practice, don't
seem to have that extra effort to
sparkle in a meet.;
Bolton finished fifth in the Big
Ten last year. With the excep-

HAL HOLMES
. .. two-time champ
tion of Holmes, the tumblers who
placed ahead of him are not par-
ticipating again this year, a fact
which leaves Bolton in a choice
position to end Holmes' long-
standing domination.
The encouraging fact that both
Henderson and Bolton return to
Michigan's gym team next year
serves to indicate that a domina-
tion of Big Ten tumbling is being
established by the Wolverines.

14 oz.

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By LLOYD GRAFF
Most Big Ten preseason fore-
casters thought that no team could
survive the rigors of a 14-game
schedule without at least three
losses.
Their prognostications are be-
ginning to look more and more
probable as the frontrunners play
more tough games away from their
own lairs. With approximately
half of the season remaining, only
two teams have less than three
losses, Illinois and Ohio State,'
which collides with Michigan this
Saturday afternoon in Ann Arbor.
The Fighting Illini couldn't
crack the Wisconsin stall in last
Monday's contest to take their
first conference loss and only their
third of the season. The Badgers,
who knocked off the highly ranked
Illinois quintet, have shown them-
selves to be the most erratic squad
in the conference.
They were humiliated before
13,500 fans at Columbus last Sa-
turday as the Buckeyes avenged
last year's sole Big Ten defeat
which came at the hands of Wis-
consin. Dick Reasbeck showed the
form which he displayed earlier in
the year in meshing 31 points to
compliment 25 by league scoring
pacesetter Gary Bradds.
Fifty Miles?
Just 9- Hours
NEW YORK M-P)-Would-be ath-
letes planning 50-mile hikes in line
with President John F. Kennedy's
physical fitness program, might
be interested to know that the
American record of *9 hours, 29
minutes, 22 seconds was set 84
years ago.
According to the Amateur Ath-
letic Union's track and field hand-
book, G. B. Gillie took a 100-mile
stroll in New York on May 10
and 11, 1878. He was timed in the
9:29:22 for 50 miles en route to
the 100-miles in 21 hours, 42 sec-
onds.

After Saturday's mediocre per-
formance Wisconsin rebounded
with vigor on their home court
with a sparkling performance
highlighted by the canny play of
Mike O'Melia and the scoring of
Jack Brens and Ken Siebel.
Contrary to the trend of home
court victories the hustling Hoos-
iers of Indiana shot Minnesota
right off their own court. The
splendid splinter, Jimmy Rayl,
inched up on Bradds in the in-
dividual scoring category, by
dumping in 32 points with his
feathery jump shot and flawless
foul shooting.
Rash of Upsets
The rash of upsets leaves the
Big Ten in a state of limbo prior
to this Saturday's key contests.
Michigan finds itself deadlocked
with a 4-3 record with Iowa and
Indiana in fourth pla ce behind
Illinois 6-1, Ohio State 5-2, and
Minnesota 5-3.
Just like in baseball, when a
team is searching for the magic
number it is the loss column which
is vital. Coaches and players us-
ually prefer to be behind in vic-
tories rather than losses because
games left to be played can still
be won, but games lost are ir-
retrievable.
So with the Wolverines just two
games back on the loss side any-
thing could happen, particularly
with both the Illinois and Ohio
State games played on the vener-
able boards of Yost Fieldhouse.
Buntin Leads...

The Michigan hockey team,
despite its tremendous tying ef-
fort, against Minnesota last Sat-,
urday night, remained in the
cellar position in the Western Col-
legiate H o c k e y Association's
standings.
North Dakota, meanwhile, drop-
ped from first to fourth place,
losing three straight contests.J
Denver moved ,into first with a
10-5-0 record, followed by Mich-
igan Tech, 8-4-2, and Minnesota,
7-4-3.
Staub LeadsI
In individual scoring, Bill Staub1
of Denver leads the league witht
12 goals and 10 assists for 22
points. Second is George Hill ofI
Michigan Tech with 19 points,j
followed closely by Louis Nanne of
Minnesota, also with 19 points.i
Michigan's Gary Butler, by virtueI
of his first period hat trick Satur-
day night, moved into sixth place.

Butler is the only Michigan player
ranked inthe top 20 scorers.
Michigan goalie Bill Bieber, re-
placement for injured Bob Gray,
stands fifth in conference stand-
ings with an average of 4.9 goals
scored against him per game.
Michigan Tech goalie Gary Bau-
man is first with a 2.2 average,
followed by North Dakota goalie
Joe Lech with a 2.7 average.
Penalty Leaders
Scrappy Wayne Kartusch of
Michigan holds the league lead in
penalties with 26, spending a total
of 66 minutes in th. penalty box.
In WCHA action this weekend
Michigan Tech invades Michigan
for a pair of games. Michigan'
States goes away to Minnesota
and league-leading Denver plays
host to North Dakota on Friday
with North Dakota at Colorado
College Saturday.

M' Remains in Last Place
In Latest WCHA Standings

W CHA Statistics . .6.

17c

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WCHA STANDINGS
W L'
Denver 10 5
Michigan Tech 8 4
Minnesota 7 4
North Dakota 6 4'
Colorado College 6 6,
Michigan State 3 7+
Michigan 1 11:

T
0
2
3
1
0
0
2

Pct.
.667
.642
.608
.591
.500
.300
.143'

G
Buntin, c 17
Cole, fcc 17
Cantrell, g 16
Harris, f-c 17
Herner, g 17
Tre'ing, f-g 17
Oost'b'n, f 14
Pomey, g 17
Gr'nwold, e 6
Jackson, g 5
Ludwig, g 6
Adamsg 3
Hildreth, f 1
Petrick, g 1

FG FT RB Ave.
147-338 75-110 273 21.7

Less Than Six Games
Westby, Minn. 2 1 0.5 6 0
Fabian, Mnn. 3 9 3.0 60'0
Gray, Mich. 5 19 3.8 131 0
Otto, N.D. 2 10 5.0 54 0
Doyle, Colo. 5 32 5.3 180 0
Warwick, Colo. 5 33 6.6 204 0
*--..Does not include statistics from
Tuesday's Denver-North Dakota
game and last night's North Dakota-
Colorado College game.
MICHIGAN SCORING

74 173
80-204
61-165
48-98
46-133
34-81
25-63
1-3
1-2
1-9
0-2
0-1

51-69 139 11.7
23-36 54 11.4
35-52 143 9.2
41-51 32 8.1
7-20 102 5.8
10-18 46 5.6
14-29 40 3.8
0-0 1 0.3
1-3 1 0.6
0-0 3 0.3
0-0 0 0.0
1-2 2 3.0
0-0, 1 0.0

SCORING LEADERS *

G
Staub, Den. 12
Hill, Tech 10
Nanne, Minn. S
Berglund, Colo. 7
Stouffer, Colo. 10
Butler, Mich. 11
McLean, N.D. 6
L. Stordahl, Minn. 9
Johnstone, MSU 11
J. Stordahl, Minn. 6
Art, Den. 4

A
10
9
11
11
8
7
11
8
5
12

T'.
22
19
19
18
18
18
17
17
16
16
16

Pen PIM
4 8
1 2
5 10
7 14
0 0
7 14
5 10
4 8
0 0
1 2
8 16

50 CASH AWARDS A MONTH. ENTER NOW. HEKL' HUW:
First, think of an answer. Any answer. Then come up with
a nutty, surprising question for it, and you've done a
"Crazy Question." It's the easy new way for students to
make loot. Study the examples below, then do your own.
Send them, with your name, address, college and class,
to GET LUCKY, Box 64F, Mt. Vernon 10, N. Y. Winning
entries will be awarded $25.00. Winning entries sub-
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$25.00 bonus. Enter as often as you like. Start right now!

N ustions
(Based on the hilarious book "The Question Mon.")
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humor (up to ), clarity and freshness (up to %) and appropriateness (up
to %), and their decisions will be final. Duplicate prizes will be awarded
in the event of ties. Entries must be the original works of the entrants and
must be submitted in the entrant's own name. There will be 50 awards
every month, October through April. Entries received during each month
will be considered for that month's awards. Any entry received after April
30, 1963, will not be eligible, and all become the property of The American
Tobacco Company. Any college student may enter the contest, except em.
ployees of The American Tobacco Company, its advertising agencies and
Reuben H. Donnelley, and relatives of the said employees. Winners will be
notified by mail. Contest subject to all federal, state, and local regulations.

Michigan 17 519-1275 258-390 928 76.8
Opponents 17 478-1156 245-373 744 70.7

Gray, g
Bieber, g
Rodgers. d
Kartusch, d
Morrison, c
Cole, f
Babcock, c
McGonigal, c
Galipeau, d
Coristine, f
Forrest, f
Butts, I
Pendlebury, f
Newton, f
Butler, f
Wilkie, c

G
0
7'
1
8
6
6"
8
0
4
2
2
7
0
21
7

A
2
0
7
6
16
4
14
4
3
9.
6
6
8
2
12
17

SATURDAY LAST DAY
of REMNANT. DAYS
MEN! Traditionally Like To
Save and Here Is Quality at a
Price That Spells Savings for
You.-
Values Beyond Compare

GOALIE STATISTICS
Six Games or More
GP GA Ave. Stops SO
Bauman, Tech 14 32 2.2,404 2
Lech, N.D. 8 16 2.7 120 0
Groth, Minn. 12 37 3.0 302 0
Unis, Den., 14 47 3.3 373 0
Bieberfi, MIch. 10 49 4.9 170 0
Chandik, MSU 10 60 6.0 364 0

T Pen PIM
00
0' 0 0
14 12 24
7 30 76
24 21 53
10 6 12
20 4 11
12 2 4
3 5 10
13 3 6
8 3 6
8 3 6
15 4 8
33 10 20
24 3 6

Michigan Totals 79 116 195 109 248
Opponent Totals 75 101 176 79,17b

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