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January 18, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-01-18

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TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

PANSION:
Cite U.S. Population Problem

By ARTHUR LEVY
The population problem "affects
more people than any disease"
and must be thought through by
everyone, Prof. Ronald Freedman
of the sociology department told
the Washtenaw County League for
Planned Parenthood in -the Michi-
gan Union Tuesday.
Speaking on "The Population
Problem: At Home and Abroad,"
Prof. Freedman described the
problem in the United States as
"not an emergency but serious
and of growing urgency." He said
the American baby boom results
from more people getting married,
more early marriages and early
births.
To illustrate each of these fac-
tors, he said that in the 1930's 30
per cent of American women 25
years old were single, while the
corresponding figure in the 1950's
was 12 per cent. Also, during the
first 18 months of marriage, 37
per cent of American women in:
the 1930's had their first child,
while in the 1950's the number is
62 per cent.
Population Expansion
Prof. Freedman stud the earlier
babies are born, the earlier they
grow up and the sooner the pop-
ulation expands, thus emphasiz-
ing the question of spacing chil-
dren over a period of time, rath-
er than' the question of family

SLATER'S

PAY

size. Babies are not coming from
large families, he stated.
Eighty per cent of the increase
in the birth rate between 1940 and
1958 is due to the first, second,
and third child.
Middle Class Values
The population explosion in the
United States is due to a change
in middle class values and teach-
ing birth control methods and
'techniques won't change the sit-
uation, he added. "The reason
most people are having large fam-
ilies is that they want them" not
that they lack birth control edu-
cation, he said.
The vast majority of Americans
use contraceptives, but a signifi-
cant minority do not know about
these methods or do not use them
effectively. He stated that 16 per
cent 'of all married women inter-
viewed in his recent study report-
ed their last pregnancy was un-
wanted. Prof. Freedman read sev-
eral cases in which large families
were comprised of unwanted chil-
dren.
He said Planned Parenthood has
a challenge in reaching the large
number of people in the lower eco-
nomic status, especially Negroes
and Puerto Ricans, and that these
individuals should be given the
help they want in learning about
"the rationality of size of families
and amount of spending." He
claimed that organized efforts
have not been successful or pri-
marily directed to reaching the
lower status people.
- Views Relationships
Prof. Freedman also viewed
problems in the relationship be-
tween a wife and her husband in
families of low economic level.
Most contraceptions are female
methods, but 'the man must also'
be reached if the birth control
program is to succeed, he stated.
The beginning of a "rapproach-
ment" between Catholics and non-
Catholics on the issue of fanily
planning. The Catholic church is
aware that too many children can
harm the welfare of a family and
prominent Catholic spokesmen
have asked for governmental sup-
port through the National Insti-
tute of Health to perfect the
rhythm method.
This method, if perfected, could
be the most efficient of all fam-
ily planning programs, he said.'
Union Plans
Nassau Trip
The Student Affairs Committee
of the Michigan Union is sponsor-
ing an "Airfiight to Nassau" to
take place over spring .vacation,
April 7-15.
All students, faculty, Universi-
ty employes and their immediate
families are eligible for the trip.
There will be room for 86 people
on the direct, round trip flight
from Detroit to Nassau.
Cost of the entire trip including
transportation and lodging in Nas-
sau will be $175.00. Harry Youtt,
'64, who is in charge of planning
for the trip, points out that round
trip plane fare alone is normally
$183.00.
A mass meeting for those in-
terested in the trip will be held
Feb. 15 at the Union.
aw DIAL 2-6264
ENDING SATURDAY *
Starring-
Leslie Carn
Maurice hevalier
Louis Jourdan

Shown at
2:20-6:05,
and 9:50J
s AND 0

I

PROF. RONALD FREEDMAN
... birth control
FELLOWSHIP:
Offer Plan
for Travel,
By SANDRA JOHNSON
Work and travel programs to
the Soviet Union, Latin America,
Japan, Europe, Washington, D.C.
and California are being offered
by .the Lisle Fellowship.
Designed to "foster individual
development through group work
in cross-cultural relationships,"
the program is under the direc-
tion of Dewitt C. Baldwin of the
Office of Religious Affairs, and
his wife Edna, founders of the fel-
lowship.
The program, sponsored by the
fellowship since its founding in
1936, also provides "practical ex-
perience through participation in
community activities,,Beldwin said.
Latin America has added to the
program, he noted. "This is a par-
ticularly exciting venture because
that area of the world has had
very unsatisfactory relations with
14orth Americans in the past. A
Lisle Fellowship group could have
much to contribute to improve
these relations," he added.
Under the program, a group first
meets and familiarizes itself witn
the new surroundings. A sizable
minority of the group being na-
tive to the visited area helps the
others get acquainted with it and
is people, Baldwin explaied.
In the next phase, a group di-
vides into -units of approximately
five persons. These units then
work in business, industry, agri-
culture or government for a short
period.
The group forms again and dis-
cusses its experiences. Then it
splits again into small units and
works at different projects. This
process is repeated three to five
times during the program.
REAL NO 8-6416
Shows at 7-9 P.M.
* ENDING SATURDAY ,
1 1 'IU:aTc+

Report Sets
Building
Priorities
By CAROLYN WINTER
"In determining the order of
priorities, the University seeks to
weigh the needs of each academic
unit against those of other units,
so that the total building program
will show a coordinated develop-
ment toward established educa-
tional goals."
This statement was among the
conclusions in the 1960 Spring Re-
port of the Subcommittee on
Campus Planning and Develop-
ment of the Senate Advisory Com-
mittee.
The report adds that the more
fully a faculty planning commit-
tee can document its development
needs, the better are the chances
that a particular building project
will receive a high priority.
Fuller Documentation
Fuller documentation of needs
helps the University to be better
armed in its efforts to raise the
necessary construction money.
It is to be remembered in deal-
ing with priorities, the report con-
tinues, that the numbered posi-
tion of a project within the first
five or ten is not an absolute
priority rating, but rather an in-
dication of relative rank within
the group identified as the most
urgent.
Existing Facilities
The demand for replacement re-
flects the age and obsolescence of
existing facilities. In this age of
rapid technological advance, rela-
tively new buildings canbe effect-
ed by obsolescence especially in
the fields of medical science, bio-
logical and social science, engi-
neering and physical science.
The demands for expansion re-
flects the growing number of uni-
versity students and the increas-
ing need for research space as an
integral function in the academic
programs.
The University has sought to
measure the extent to which the
facilities occupied-by various edu-
cational activities deviate from the
accepted standards of space and
equipment and then to weigh the
value of each proposed new facil-
ity in relation to the operation of
the University as a whole.
Specialized Areas
Projects demonstrating the most
urgent inadequacies of space and
equipment in highly specialized
areas-primarily those assigned
for the most advanced education
and professional training -have
been given highest priority.
However, when the legislature
votes on granting funds for build-
ing projects they re-evaluate the
priorities, not always awarding
funds to number one on the list.
In this way, the Music School
has been overlooked for five years.

CADAVERS:
Huelke Notes 'U' Role
In Secret Grave Robbing

By LOUISE LIND/
"Although grave robbing did not
originate with the University, it
was used extensively by the med-
ical school in the late 1800's as
the only means to obtain an ade-
quate supply of cadavers," Prof.
Donald F. Huelke of the anatomy
department said.
Addressing the Monday night
gathering of the Washtenaw His-
torical Society, Prof. Huelke spoke
on "Troubled Times for the Uni-
versity-Body-Snatching in Mich-
igan."
When the medical school was
founded in October, 1850, it found
itself caught in the middle of the
controversy over grave robbing.
Anatomy Course
A basic anatomy course was
one of the first that beginning
medical students were required to
take. The course involved demon-
strations of human anatomy with
15-20 cadavers. Yet, at that time
grave robbing was forbidden by

themselves on their motto, "We
raise them up," Prof. Huelke said.
Attempting to avoid any unnec-
essary controversy, the University
forbade the resurrectionists to des-
ecrate any local graves for fear
of angering the people in the im-
mediate area.
Despite these precautions, one
grave desecrated in Jackson Coun-
ty was traced to the university.
After the local people heard of this
scandal, only an armed patrol of
alerted medical students was able
to restrain them from burning the
school.
'Pickle'Barrels
"The stolen bodies were sent
to the University from great dis-
tances in barrels marked 'pickles'
to keep themr from being opened,"
he said. "This is probably how
the expression, 'Don't get yourself
into a pickle' evolved," he com-
mented.
Barrels from all over the coun-
try reached Ann Arbor addressed
to non-existent business firms.
This procedure enabled the Uni-
versity to pick up the freight from
general delivery without arousing
unnecessary curiosity..
To protect their dead from the
execrable body snatchers, the peo-
ple of the day, would hire "grave
watchers" to guard the cemetery
plots at night. No one was safe
from the looters, and in one in-
stance the body of a body snatch-
er himself turned up in the anat-
omy lab at the University.
State of Emergency
"At the end of the Civil War,
matters had reached a state of
emergency. With the great influx
of medical students,- the demand
for cadavers had risen from 20-
125," Prof. Huelke related.
Prof. Corydon Ford, then pro-
fessor of anatomy at the Univer-
sity, appealed to the State Legis-
lature for help. "In 1875, it pass-
ed the first real anatomical act
which provided that all bodies
buried at public expense were to
be sent to the University," Prof.
Huelke elaborated. "After about
1881, there were no more problems
with grave robbers.
In 1958, Prof. Russell T. Wood-
burne of the anatomy department
had a bill passed that revised and
brought up to date the old anat-
omy act. It established an ana-
tomical committee to have con-
trol of all unclaimed bodies, their
transportation, preservation, and
allocation.

r
r
t
l
t
t
i
J

STEREO and HI-FI
DEALER'S
WEDNESDAY -January 17
THRU
SATURDAY - January 20
PRE-INVENTORY SAL
on
Every Label in Our Stoc

ABC COLUMBIA LIBERTY
ANGEL COMMAND LONDON
ARCHIVE CONTEMPORARY MERCURY
ARGO CRI MGM
ARTIA DECCA MONITOR
ATLANTIC DOT NEW JAZZ
AUDIO FIDELITY DYER BENNET OFFBEAT
BACH-GUILD ELEKTRA PACIFIC JAZZ
BETHLEHEM EPIC' PRESTIGE
BLUE NOTE FANTASY RCA
BLUESVILLE FIESTA REPRISE
BOSTON FOLKWAYS RIVERSIDE
CADENCE GOOD TIME JAZZ SPOKEN ARTS
CAEDMON GRAND AWARD TICO
CAPITOL HI FI UNITED ARTI
CHANCELLOR IMPULSE VANGUARD
CHECKER JUBILEE VERVE
COLPIX KAPP WESTMINSTER
* IMPORTS EXCLUDED
.d scun records, n
337 South Main Street
FREE PARKING , NO 5-446(
OPEN MON. THRU FRI., 10-9 P.M.
SAT., 9 TO 6 P.M.
Free Shuttlebus Return from Downtown
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
presents
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
DINNER AT 8:00
7:00 and-9:00
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
PUDOVKIN'S
STORM OVE R ASIA
7:00 and 9:20

$3.98 ist
2.4

$4.98 list
3.09

5.98 list
3.o7

PROF. DONALD HUELKE
... grave robbing
law and there was no other meth-
od by which the University could
obtain human bodies.
"The school had to have human
specimens in order to graduate
well qualified doctors," Prof. Huel-
ke said, "and so was forced into
the undignified profession of grave
robbing for the sake of the ad-
vancement of medicine."
"The medical school surrepti-
tiously bribed 20-30 people in dis-
tant areas to do its body snatch-
ing at night under the cover of.
darkness," he explained.
'Resurrectionists'
These "employes" were termed
"resurrectionists" a n d prided

I

Body Parts
A complementary act made
legal for a person to will all
part of his body to science.
Today, no one robs graves ax
more and the medical school si
doesn't pay for its bodies, he sa

.I

The Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
cordially invites you to an evening of Theatre you will never
forget, as we present one of the most powerful plays in
American theatre history.

THE

CRUCIBLE

I

by
ARTHUR, MILLER
Directed by Donald Lovell

it
or
ty-
till'
yid.

Dinner at 8:00 (1933) written
by George Kaufman and Edna
Ferber, is a story that tries to
capture life's habit of shifting
into curious patterns for no
reason whatsoever. In this case,
the lives of eight people are
moved into the pattern which
leads to their becoming eight
guests at a Dinner at 8:00.,
For this story, director George
Cukar had one of the greatest
casts ever assembled. At the
center is John Barrymore as,
Larry Renault, the "burned-
out" star around whom the
ironic tragedy revolves. Marie
Dressler is superb as a buoy-
antly ancient actress; Wallace.
Beery, Jean Harlow, Lione
Barrymore, Billie Burke, Lee
Tracy, and Edmund Lowe are
among the other luminaries.
The film is a feast of grand-
style acting and perennially
fresh theatre.
Seeing an extensive series of
Soviet films in 1947-48 was a
unique experience historically.
The Cold War was at its most
frigid. With iost Americans
there was at least an initial
defense of negative reactions to
the work of Eisenstein, Pudov-
kin, Dovchenko. Were not these
films pure propaganda? What
were they trying to say apart
from advancing the cause of the
totalitarian government whose
viewpoint they obviously re-
flected?nAt that point I felt that
this was particularly true of the
brilliant series of Eisenstein
films. Nothing that happened
appeared to say more than that
"history" has caught up with
the opponents of the Marxist;
dialectic. Beautiful though his
films were, they negated the in-
dividual. I found them monu-

of his great contemporary
rival, Vsevelod Pudovkin. H
it seemed, were present in
est measure the qualities I
lacking in Elsenstein: Poe
lyricism, humanity. They
sessed the epic sweep no
than Eisenstein and an e
skill in editing to reach po'
full climates. Pudovkin i
great romantic artist, El
stein a classic; in these e
experiences Pudovkin's imm
acy was directly moving.
For Eisenstein the hero of
films was always the "mass
a concept that Americans, n
ished in an individualistic
dition, find difficult to un
stand. The masses, however
society in the classic Mar
framework; and when I i
Eisenstein a classic artisi
is in this sense of his subo
nation of the individual to s
ety.
Pudovkin's esthetic was q
different, concentrating on
inner emotion, the -release
the individual through me
ingful thought that is eve
ally released in revolutio:
action. Whatever their di
ences, Eisenstein's analysi
Pudovkin is an illumine
tribute: "In his films the s
tator's attention is not con
trated on the developmen
the plot, but on the psyi
change undergone by some
dividual under the infiuent
social, process. Pudovkin1
real living men in the centi
his work. His works act dire
by their emotional power."
Storm over Asian is a pr
ent film. The Communist x
lution in Chinamight well
the determining factor in
balance of power in this

An Allied Artists Release
STARTING SUNDAY
MODIGLIANI
De MONT PARNASSE

Il

DIAL NO 5-6290
NOTE TIME SCHEDULE

WHEN!.. ..Opening night TONIGHT, January 18
other performances, January 19, 0
WHERE! . . . . . .Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
- .A m. m . d i b F

For All

"A very wonderful mixture of Chinese tradition and American charm."
-Michael Harrah, Daily

- ---- - - - --- d v

.,. f n - - '.

II 1 v n lnWAV' IS JOYOUS MULSICAL LOJVE STOIfYI

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