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September 15, 1961 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

15,1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA6E

15, 1961 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAng

a a .a

Peek'T'alks on President
For Incoming Freshmen

Extension Service Sets Courses

By ELLEN SILVERMAN
A president's power comes from
his ability to persuade and mold
public opinion, not from his power
to command, Prof. George Peek of
the political science department
said yesterday at a student-
faculty discussion for new fresh-
men.
Prof. Peek spoke through the
facilities of a closed circuit tele-
vision which was beamed to 12
rooms in the Frieze Bldg.
Basing some of the lecture on
a new book, "Presidential Power,"
by Richard Neustadt of Columbia
University, he stressed that the
power of a president fails when.
he is forced to use his power to
command..
Using the illustrations of Tru-
man's firing of Gen. Douglas Mac-
Arthur, seizure of the steel mills
and the entrance of troops into
Little Rock, he pointed out that
in each case the president had
failed earlier to persuade the pub-
lic and the persons involved to
avoid such action.
This, Prof. Peek said, was a
failure of the president, who did
not keep his power within his
own hands.
He emphasized that a president
can keep informed and ready to
make his own decisions by reading
newspapers, have cross-informa-
tion channels and informing the
public by focusing on the issues.
Prof. Peek cited former Presi-
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt's use
of "fireside chats" to inform the
public and thereby mold public
opinion.
The power that a president
holds may justify the use of the
SGC Sets Date
For Seminar
The Summer Reading Program
will present its first seminar dur-
ing the second week of classes,
Eugenia Pann, '62, chairman of the
committee, said last Wednesday.
For the 300 students who join-
ed the program last May, the
seminars offer an opportunity to
- discuss the books which they read
during the summer.
All students are invited to join
the seminars. Miss Pann especially
encourages, interested freshman to
attend. Posters in the Under-
graduate Library will announce
the time and place of the semi-
nars.

v
f

By CAROLINE DOW
Barbour Gym is not the only
scene of registration in Ann Arbor.
At 412 Maynard, students are
registering for the Ann Arbor area
extension and' correspondence
courses.
Registration for the extension
programs extends through Sept.
29, and correspondence courses
are available year-round. Daytime
registration is handled at the Ex-
tension Service Building, while the
Administration Building handles
registration from 6:15 to 7:15 p.m.
Monday through Thursday until
Sept. 29.
Extension service now offers
over 400 courses to 60 communi-
ties across the state, Director E.
J. Soop reports.
Many Eligible
Any candidate for a degree
from the University may take up
to 30 hours of their undergraduate
credit in correspondence courses.
To offer actual class courses to
about 11,000 off-campus students
a year, the University employs
over 600 instructors to teach these
evening and off-hour classes.
The Ann Arbor area offers 12
credit and eight non-credit courses

and serves on the average of 300
students a year. Credit courses
are offered this fall in business
administration, engineering geo-
graphy, history, mathematics, po-
litical science, psychology, soci-
ology and speech.
A certificate course in the real
estate program is also scheduled.
Classes are slated to begin Sept.
18.
Last July, the extension service
made its fourth move in its 50
year history to become consoli-
dated in the former University
Press Building on Maynard Street.
Only the Civil Defense and Fire-
manship Training program re-
main elsewhere on campus. They
are located at the Civil Defense
and Disaster Training Center on
North Campus because of the
special facilities there.
Cooperates with WSU
In addition to transporting
professors from central areas to
the community classes, the Uni-
versity gives correspondence
courses, holds seminars, confer-
ences and cooperates with Wayne
State University in adult educa-
tion courses.
Registration for courses in thisl

WSU-University Division of adult
education is held at the Extension
Service building from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and in the Business Ad-
ministration Bldg. from 6:15 to
7:15 p.m., Monday through Thurs-
day until Sept. 2.
Adult education courses include
creative art, business and employe
relations, foreign languages, liter-
ature, music and reading improve-
ment.
G&S Society
Plans Meeting
A mass organizational meeting
for all those interested in working
on Gilbert and Sullivan will be
held Monday, Sept. 18 at 7:30
p.m. in the Union, Co-Publicity
Chairman Worth Stephenson,
'63E, announced yesterday.
Students may sign up for com-
mittees' including make-up, pub-
licity and program, and the stage
crew at the meeting.
Try-outs for this year's show.
H. M. S. Pinafore will be next
week.

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PROF. GEORGE PEEK
... president's role

phrase "constitutionally limited
dictatorship," he said. This power
is, however, dependent upon the
president's"subtle use" of it and
not his "bold initiation of action
by direct commands to people
not already convinced of its bene-
fit."
Report Notes
Student Health
Student health at the Univer-
sity showed a marked improve-
ment last year, according to the
annual Health Service report.
There were 5,500 fewer visits to
Health Service last year than in
the previous school year. Mean-
while, approximately 1,000 more
students were added to those en-
titled to health care.
Fewer allergies, respiratory ail-
ments, skin disorders, and ear
troubles were reported last year.
Also, less medicine was consumed.
However, students had more
dental complaints, eye troubles,
and intestinal upsets. They were
also given more X-ray examina-
tions.
The health service pharmacy
filled 32,181 prescriptions. There
were 15,546 X-rays and 41,232
laboratory tests. A total of 96,067
visits were made to the service this
year, nearly 12,000 below the
highest, point of the last five
years. ,
Skin disorders, accounting for
2,773 cases, and ear troubles, 756
cases, fell to five year lows.

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AESSIAH CONCERT-The University Choral Union, pictured in Hull Auditorium during a perforni4
of Handel's "Messiah," is now being organized irn preparation for its flnd season.
MEMBERSHIP is open to oil qualified singers. Auditions for new
members are held daily through September 23. Appointmenits
should be made at the offices of the University Musical Society,
first floor Burton Memorial Tower (telephone 668-75'13. Fimer
members are readmitted without audition, 'provided aplcation
is made by September 23.
REHEARSALS are held every Tuesday evening at 7:00. Extra
rehearsals are scheduled before performances and at such other
times as mnay be required.
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION performs in two annual
performances of Handel's Messiah each December. Also, it has
Theen a tradition since the beginning of the -Ann Arbor May Fes-
tival in 1894 that it is featured in mnajor choral works, both of
the standard and modern repertoire in two of the May Festival
conCerts.
COURTESY TICKETS are provided to members for all concerts
of the Choral Union Series and M~ay Festival.

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