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January 12, 1962 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-01-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y

ellermann: Wrestling Success

FLINT GIRLS TO GIVE EXHIBITION:
Michigan Gymnasts Open Home Season
Toni ght with Central Michigan Squad

By TOM ROWLAND
'f you had told Fritz Kellermann
;er his first two sophomore col-
e wrestling meets that "suc-
a breeds success" he probably
,ldn't have believed you.
rwo pins-both of them with
llermann on the bottom side-
ght have accounted for the
ibt.
Discouraging Start
k discouraging start, maybe, but
t for Fritz Kellerman. Now, two
irs and two Big Ten individual
impionships later, the scrappy
>lverine can look back on suc-
s in excess. Kellermann not
ly broke into the winners'
umn but grappled his way to
conference championship that.
>homore year at 137 pounds
i then repeated as a Big Ten
le-holder last winter at 130..
It's a big switch from high
tool wrestling to that in col-
e," Kellermann explains the
rly mat disasters, "and lack of
perience and a little excess nerv-
mess were big blocks to me in
ose first two meets."
Kellermann wrestled while at-
iding Lansing Sexton High
hiool, where he broke into the
eup after ineligibility struck the
imber one man at 127 pounds. It
s this "first big incentive" that
it him to a second place in the
te tournament during his first
ar of competition and followed
a to the 133-pound Michigan
te title in his senior year.
Praises Coaches
Kellermanfl points to his coaches
fore talking of his own abilities.
Ve been coached by two of the
eatest men in the business," says
llermann. "It was Iggy Konrad,
e of the best high school coaches
,und, that really got me started,
d here at Michigan I couldn't
under a better coach than Cliff
en."
Looking back over his college

competition, Kellermann men-
tions his match last year with
Pittsburgh's Olympian Larry
Lauchle, who had placed second
nationally for two years, as a high-
light. "It was just one of those
matches when I knew I was ready.
I worked hard and beat him, 6-4."
Kellermann dropped only one
dual meet last year, that to Iowa's
Tom Hoff, whom Kellermann tags
as "one of the best wrestlers I've
ever competed against."
Competition To Come
Despite his four victories in as
many dual meets this winter, the
Wolverine star is conscious that
"the real competition is yet to
come."
"I think I'm being handicapped
by the rule change that allows two
points for a first takedown and
only one for every takedown after
that," says Kellermann, whose
takedown is a -strong point. "And
now the match is slowed down
with the slower action."
Great Last Year
As for this year's team, Keller-
mann comments: "We're going to
have to go far to better last year's
squad. You just can't replace
people like Jim Blaker, Denny
Fitzgerald and Karl Fink all of a
sudden. But we've got lots of
talent and some determined sophs,
and we're improving all the time.
This year's is one of the best
balanced teams I've ever seen.'
Coach Keen is full of praise for
his 137-pound champ. "Fritz ranks
among the best wrestlers I've
coached. He learns fast, is very
quick, and is a great competitor."
Kellermann is earnest when he
says that "wrestling means a great1
deal to me. It keeps me working
hard, both at my studies and on
the mats. It's helped me to drive
toward something-to give me a
great deal of added incentive. And,
as you know, success breeds suc-
cess."

V

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
STAR 137-POUNDER-Fritz Kellerman, two-time Big Ten wrest-
ling champion, is undefeated in four meets this winter in the
'137-pound class. The Lansing senior lost only a single dual match
last season before going on to cop an individual conference title at
130 pounds.
NCAA-NAAU CONTROVERSY:
Settlement A nticip ated

By JAN WINKELMAN
The Michigan gymnastics team
will open its home season tomor-
row at 8:00 p.m. in the gym of the
I-M building hosting the squad
from Central Michigan University.
Women To Perform
An exhibition will be given by
a group of highly talented women
gymnasts from Flint Junior Col-
lege. Last year the exhibition
NAAU Asks
White House'
Investigation,
HIGH POINT, N.C. (1P) - The
president of the Amateur Athletic
Union says he welcomes the idea
of a White Hoise investigation
into the AAU dispute with the
National Collegiate Athletic Asso-
ciation.
"I think it will bear us out," said
Louis J. Fisher, High Point at-
torney, of the investigation. "It
may put the NCAA in an em-
barassing position, but they asked
for it."
Walter Byers, NCAA executive
secretary, recently urged against
the idea of a White House investi-
gation.
Fisher charged Thursday that a
group within the NCAA is trying
to destroy the NAAU"
Chick Werner of Penn State
proposed to the NCAA at its Chi-
cago convention this week that a
new National Track and Field
Federation be formed, with the
NAAU, armed services and colleges
on equal footing. -
Fisher opined that new federa-
tions wduld not succeed because
the NCAA lacks administrative
ability to replace the NAAU in in-
ternational athletics.

proved extremely successful and
was greatly enjoyed by all who
attended.
Admission to this and subse-
quent dual meets is free to all
students and faculty members of
the University. -
Prior to the meet and exhibition,
Coach Newt Loken plans to con-
duct a short clinic with the three
groups of gymnasts. This should
afford anyone interested in gym-
nastics, but unfamiliar with the
sport a chance to "get acquainted"
with the various events.
CMU Is Improving
Loken does not expect Central
Michigan to be a great threat to
the Wolverines, but predicts that
"they are rapidly becoming a bet-
ter team, and are improved and
improving."
Last week's loss to the powerful
Illini didn't discourage Loken. The

score was tied going into the last
event, tumbling. Hal Holmes, Illi-I
nois' great tumbler, captured first
place with a brilliant performance.
to clinch the meet.
Michigan had defeated Illinois
in last year's Big .Ten Champion-
ship meet, winning its first cham-
pionship in 15 years. The -neet last
year was held in Ann Arbor; this
year's meet was at Champaign.
LaRose Takes Two Firsts
Gil LaRose performed well for
the Wolverines last week, winning
high bar and still rings, and taking
second on the parallel bars.
Captain Tom Osterland easily
won trampoline and sophomore
Arno Lascari was victorious on the
parallel bars for the Wolverines.
Illinois put in a strong perform-
ance on sidehorse finishing 1-2-3
with Bill Lawler, Ray Hadley, and
Mike Aufrecht.

Next week Michigan travels to
East Lansing and will face the
Iowa Hawkeyes in a double away
meet.
Women Are Champions
Loken emphasized the calibre of
the women from Flint. In the
group are several national and re-
gional champions.
Judy Klauser was a member of
te team sent to the Pan-American
games in 1959, and traveled to
Japan and Moscow in 1960 repre-
senting the United States.
The Dunham sisters, Janice and
Judy, are both champions. Janice
was in Prague this summer as a
member of the national women's
gymnastic team. Judy is National
Clinic Developmental Champ.
Donna Schoenser is Midwest
Free Exercise champion. She was
also Junior NAAU tumbling
champ.

3 1

TROUSER

OAKLAND, Calif. (M)-Kenneth
L. (Tug) Wilson, president of the
United States Olympic Commit-
tee, is trying to arrange a peace
meeting between the NCAA and
AAU, the Oakland Tribune' said
last night.
Four previous meetings between
the two groups have met with
little success. The NCAA has ad-
vocated formation of new federa-

tions to administer amateur ath-
letics, a function now held by the
AAU.
Wilson was quoted that chances
of a showdown meeting to resolve
the situation appear good.
The NCAA yesterday at its
meeting in Chicago endorsed crea-
tion of new federations for track,
field, and gymnastics.'
The council's action on the new
federations was anticipated after
creation of both was endorsed by
the NCAA's'executive committee
Thursday. The move will further
open the break between the NCAA
and AAU.

SALE
1288
ALL PLAIN FRONT
CLASSIC MODELS

.

Solverine Cagers Travel To Test Ability
against OSU; We'll Show Up,'-Strack

By TOM WEBBER
Preparing to meet Ohio State in
basketball is a very singular ex-
perience for a team and its coach.
Unless you're the world's big-
gest optimist, crazy, or perhaps
Cincinnati's coach, you just don't
expect your team to beat Ohio
State. Rather, you hope that they
won't completely rout your team
and that Buckeye Coach Fred
Taylor will show mercy and use
his reserves some.
Someone said that maybe it was
a good thing that Woody Hayes
doesn't coach the basketball team
too, and it seemed like a good
point. Wolverine Coach Dave
Strack says that Bump Elliott
wants him to score 50 points. It
may be an optimistic goal.
Possible Upset?
It's not that the Wolverines are
underdogs in this Saturday's
game, but if they won, it would
be the biggest upset since Cin-
cinnati beat the Yankees in the
World Series---if they would have.
NBA,
Cincinnati 145, Philadelphia 128.
NHL
Chicago 6, Boston 0
Montreal 4, Toronto 2
^ COLLEGE HOCKEY
MsU 5, cc 4

Invariably, the first question re-
porters ask an opposing coach is
will they show up. Strack says his
team will be there, which is a
good sign.
All this nonsense has set a new
trend in the Big Ten this year. In-
stead of rooting for the varsity,
everybody talks about their fresh-
men teams, hoping for next year
when John Havelicek, Jerry Lu-
cas, and Mel Nowell will have
graduated.
This year, as they did last year,
coaches are trying all sorts of
techniques to stop the Bucks. Flor-
ida State double-teamed Lucas to
stop the big fellow from scoring.
He didn't, but he didn't shoot
either and Havlicek scored 22,
hitting 10-12 from the floor. The
Seminoles lost 72-57.,
St. Louis Ineffective
.St. Louis decided to hold the
ball. They did but the Buckeyes
didn't and the score was 21-2 in
a short time. "St. Louis didn't hit
a field goal for the first 13 min-
utes--they held the ball real
well, Strack observed.
Most coaches, however, stick
to realism and take steps which
will prepare their team to go on
the floor against Taylor's terrors.
They pick out their top scorer,
whom Havlicek will probably
guard, and. have a reserve hang
on each arm while he practices.
Superman Tactics Practiced
They select the lucky forward

who will have to try to guard Hav- This Weekend in Sports
licek and have him practice
guarding two men. Then they take
their guards outside and haveTd
them race a firetruck to give them GYMNASTICS-Central Michigan (here) 8 p.m.
an idea how fast the Buckeye fast
break is. to rrow
After all this the coach realizes BASKETBALL-Ohio State (there)
that even then there is only one WRESTLING--Purdue (here), 3:00 p.m.
formula to beat the Bucs-shoot SWIMMING-Purdue (here), 3:00 p.m.
90 per cent and hope you get
enough shots. And if you can't doy
that, by all means don't antago- BASKETBALL--Iowa (here), 8:00 p.m.
nize them.

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