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December 12, 1961 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1961

THE 1MIC~HIGAN DfAILY

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PAGE SE~ V

I

I

m

The Inside Corner
with Dave Andrews

Beating the Drum
THE MICHIGAN HOCKEY TEAM turned pro Friday night, and from
all reports and observations it agreed with them.
Not pro per se-the Michigan Athletic Department, the Big Te
and the NCAA frown upon that sort of stuff-but they came clos
enough so the real thing is hard to distinguish.
n All the lights and frivolity of the big time were there in De-
troit's immaculate Cobo Hall Convention Arena. The Michigan
Marching Band provided the music, the Ann Arbor "Hockettes,"
complete with their weather-beaten scratchy record, added a
little sex and managed to chop up the ice, and the appearance of
two Michigan "cheerleaders" of the female variety opened a
few eyes.
It was quite a spectacle. The minor difficulties, like the mai
event playing second fiddle while Gov. John B. Swainson and othe
assorted dignitaries took their red carpet bows, didn't seem to bothe
the some 7,700 onlookers who had found their way down the maze o
escalators and ramps to the arena.
The official attendance was announced as 6,675, but there wer
more than that there. It was a surprisingly good turnout when one
considers that Detroit's Junior Red Wings attracted their best crowd
in history (over 5,000 paid) just a short distance away in Olympia.
Uncol*egiate*
BUT SOMEHOW, the atmosphere wasn't collegiate. The seats, those
plush soft ones more commonly found in theatres than at sport-
Ing events, and though the band placed "The Victors" and "Sing
Sing, Sing," several times, the place was dead. The goal lights didn'
even flash red. Instead, when someone scored all that flashed was a
battery of white lights.
The impression was difficult to avoid that it was all more of ar
exhibition for curious petroiters and a reunion for Michigan alumni
"This, isn't like the Red Wing games," one socialite remarked
"the crowds at Olympia are so loud and boisterous. It's nice in here.'
But for promoter Tommy Emmet, a long-time hockey bug,
the evening was a success. Reports had it that he and Michigan
needed 5,000 customers to break even. The extra 1,675 paid at
anywhere from $1 to $3 per head should have, made the en-
deavor worth while. The talk is that they'll try the same stunt
again next year. All of which brings us around to the point of said
journalistic effort.
The people in Detroit were impressed with the caliber of hockey
the collegiate teams showed, despite the sedate atmosphere. The
Michigan faculty people who drove the 40 miles to Detroit to take
part in the event were impressed, and Michigan Coach Al Renfrew and
his teain were impressed.
The game was the same. The only thing changed was the sur-
roundings and the addition of the band, all of which means that
Michigan could stage the same show in Ann Arbor, if there was a de-
cent place to play. The same might well be true of basketball.
Neither Respectable...
NEIER ANCIENT YOST FIELD HOUSE or the Michigan Coli-
seum comes close to meeting the standards of respectable arenas
for the basketball and hockey teams.
The Coliseum, besides being cramped and post filled, doesn't
even offer a reasonable size dressing room for the visiting team.
The spectator facilities are horrible as anyone who has visited
the rink will testify. Reserve seats are negligible. In order to get a
general admission vantage point of any worth the fan must arrive and
camp in the cold rink somewhere near an hour before faceoff time.
It's no 'small wonder that games in Ann Arbor fail to draw De-
troit fans. The Coliseum chases away Ann Arborites and all but the
most loyal student hockey fans.
Yet it seems a little fantastic to hope for a new rink. In 25
years maybe, or if the Coliseum burns down (hum?), but to even
consider such a thing now is out of the question. The Athletic
Department budget couldn't stand it and consideration of one
would stir up such a fiscal storm in Lansing that even mention of
a new rink is taboo.
But it's fun to dream. Days until Christmas pass faster that way.
Maybe some day for Christmas Santa or some well-wishing alumni
will present Michigan with a rink that could seat comfortably the
some 10,000 fans that Michigan Tech, Denver, Minnesota and
Michigan State would pull. It might even handle the smaller crowds
that North Dakota, Colorado College and Toronto attract.
And who knows, maybe even a few of those Detroit socialites
might even cruise up the expressway to take in the supposedly "nicer'
collegiate atmosphere.

COR RIERE, RHODES, WILCOX EXCI
Matmen Down
Special To The Daily
ANNAPOLIS-Three pins, two
of them by sophomore light-
weights Carl Rhodes and Gerry
Wilcox and the other by* Captain
n Don Corriere, powered the Michi-
e .gan wrestling team to a 21-11
triumph over a strong Navy squad
here yesterday.
It was the Wolverines second
consecutive win of the season and
climaxed their eastern trip.
M' Starts Fast
Coach Cliff Keen's Wolverines
struck early and hard, with Rhodes
opening the action with a pin in
n { the 123-lb. match. Wilcox, a soph-
,r omore wrestling his first match
for Michigan, followed suit, pin-
ning the Middies' Craw d at
5:30 with a half nelson and top
body scissors.
'e Next in line for the Wolverines
e was Fritz Kellerman, who deci-
sioned Farrar of Navy, 5-2.
Following Kellerman's dec'sion,
the Middies staged a comeback
bid as McGrath and Meinig post-
CAPT. DON CORRIERE ed decisions over Michigan's Jim
e . .'pancakes' his Middie Keen and Wayne Miller.
Mnrrth nnnedKeenby -

Middies, 21-11

Michigan's Jack Barden round-
ed out the meet with a 6-3 deci-
sion over Navy's Larabee.
In an exhibition match, Michi-
gan's Nick Armelagos lost to Mid-
die GarynYoung, 6-4. It was a
130-lb. contest.
FitzGerald Pleased
Michigan assistant coach Den-
nis FitzGerald was pleased with
the Wolverines' showing. "We got
an early Jump on them and heiK~
the lead. The sophomores, again
did well, especially in the lighter
weights.
"(Mike) Vuocolo did not wrestle
because he stretched a muscle in
the Hofstra meet," he said. Vuo-

cola wrestled at 177-lbs. against
the Flying Dutchmen.
"Fritz Kellerman turned in his
usual workmanlike performance,
and Jim Keen and Wayne Miller
lost close matches to good oppo-
nents in the last minute."
"We were pleased with thenwin,
especially with the sophomores,
who won against good competi-
tion," he added.
This weekend, the Wolverines
will open their Big Ten slate as
they travel to Bloomington to take
on Indiana's Hoosiers.
NBA Score
Cincinnati 133, Chicago 117

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BIG TEN:
Purdue
Succumbs
Terry Dischinger threw in 36
points for Purdue last night but
it wasn't quite enough to stop a
Wichita five that put on a display
of outcourt sharpshooting to win
71-68. Wichita's guards collected
41 points between them. The loss
was Purdue's first.
Wisconsin put on a show of cage
power by subduing Washington,
91-63.
In other Big Ten games with
intersectional rivals the Indiana
Hoosiers downed North Carolina
by a 76-70 count, and Iowa handed
South Dakota State a 69-62 deci-
sion.
Notre Dame couldn't quite match
the quintet from Nebraska, the
Cornhuskers winning 65-61.
Detroit rolled by Xavier 88-73,
and Cincinnati slipped by Drake
60-59.

McGrath nipped Keen by a 5-3
score, and Meinig edged Miller,
3-2. McGrath was seeded No. 1 in
the Eastern Intercollegiate Wres-
tling Tournament last year.
Corriere Wing
Corriere put a stop to the Mid-
dies' uprising, however, as he pin-
ned his opponent with a pancake
at 7:30.
In the 177-1b. match, Navy's
Uber pinned Bill Florence with a
half-nelson and arm bar.
Three Pins
123--Rhodes (M) pinned Carlson
at 5:29 with cradle.
130-Wilcox (M) pinned Crawford
at 5:30 with half nelson and top
body scissors.
137-Kellerman (M) decisioned
Farrar, 5-2.
147 - McGrath (N) decsioned
Keen, 5-3.
157-Meinig (N) decisioned Miller,
3-2.
167-Corriere (M) pinned Nelson
at 7:30 with pancake.
177-Uber (N) pinned Florence at
7:30 with half nelson and arm bar.
Heavyweight-Barden (M) deci-
sioned Larabee, 6-3.
Get him
~GBD
OPEN EVENINGS TILL XMAS
7 UPipe Center I
1217 South University

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SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
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Is old age slowing
up the Ceics? Bob Cousy
is 33. Teammate Carl Braun is even
older. Will old age put an end to the
Boston Celtics' winning streak?
Coach Red Auerbach reports in this
week's Saturday Evening Post.
SPECIAL. 7962 CALENDAR PAGES
Dec. 16 issue Tb. S'uarday Evning
now on sale.
0*

1 IrIi

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