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December 10, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-12-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA4

Pope John Delivers
Awaited Encyclieal
VATICAN CITY QP)-Pope John XXIII pleaded powerfully for
world Christian unity yesterday by invoking the memory of Pope Leo
the Great who, in the Fifth Century, stood up to Attila the Hun and
dissuaded him from attacking Rome.
Leo I became a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. In his time
he faced doctrinal heresy both in the West and the East while the de-
clining Roman Empire faced the assaults of barbarian hordes.
Maintains Unity
In his sixth encyclical, "Aeterna Dei Sapientia"-The Eternal
'Wisdom of God-Pope John hailed the great Pontiff and called for
union of the world's Christian
forces to face modern perils.
s : f " .Awaited for weeks, the encycli-,
cal was dated Nov. 11, in commem-
Soration of the 15th centenary of'
X~i : the death of Pope Leo in 461.

DOMINICAN UNREST:
Prospect of Settlement Endangered

SANTO DOMINGO-The off-
again-on-again prospect of a Do-
minican political settlement ap-
peared endangered again last
nignai.
President Joaquin Balaguer told
the official newspaper La Nacion
no definite agreement has been
reached on a ormula to settle
the crisis. He deplored leakage of
information on the negotiations.
The denial came after the high-
est opposition and diplomatic
sources reported a government-op-

position agreement in principle on
a basis for installation of a new
provisional government that would
spell the eventual exit of Balaguer.
Deny Resignation
The presidential press office de-
nied what it called radio reports
that Balaguer, a holdover from
the Trujillo dictatorship, would
resign by Jan. 1.
Diplomats and opposition spokes-
men, in reporting the accord yes-
terday, told newsmen the question
of who would get two or three of

World News Roundup

POPE JOHN XXIII
. . . recalls Leo
ALLIES:
Joint Po icy
Try Fais
PARIS (Pm) - French President
Charles de Gaulle and West Ger-
man Chancellor Konrad Adenauer
conferred 4% hours yesterday.
They concluded with a joint
statement which indicated they
failed to achieve agreement. De
Gaulle apparently stood firm on
his well known opposition to im-
mediate negotiations..

No Mention
Pope John did not mention the
word Communism. But Vatican
sources said the Pontiff obviously
also intended the encyclical as a
call to the world's Christian forces
to band together against the
threat of atheistic Communism.
In his conclusion, Popes John
said:
"May we be permitted to renew
the most ardent wish that went
forth from the soul of St. Leo;
that is, to see all those redeemed
by the most precious blood, of
Jesus Christ reunited in the same
militant church, resisting com-
pactly and intrepidly the powers
of evil which from so many sides
continue to menace the Christian
faith."
Pope Implores
At .another point Pope John
implored:'
"May the Lord deign that the
dawn will soon rise of that bless-
ed day of universial recohcilia-
tion."
Pope John's encyclical made it
clear, however, that by Christian
unity the Roman Catholic Church
still believes in unity under the
Pope's authority. Pope Leo, who
called an ecumenical council dedi-
cated largely to Christian' unity,
also .held that belief.
The publication of Pope John's
encyclical coincided with the con-
clusion of the third assembly of
the World Council of Churches.

By The Associated Press
SYDNEY -- The Conservative
coalition government of Austra-
lian Prime Minister Robert G.
Menzies appeared early today to
have been returned to power for
three more years in yesterday's
national election.
* * *
BOGOTA - Colombian Presi-
dent Alberto Lleras Camargo an-
nounced last night a break in
Colombia's relations with Cuba.
The rupture came less than 24
hours after Cuban Prime Minister
Fidel Castro- denounced Colombia
and Panama as "accomplices of
imperialism."
* * *
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. - The
Navy yesterday launched the nu-
clear-powered U.S.S. Tinosa, the
second of America's most advanc-
ed submarines.
* * *
POINT MUGU, Calif. - A Nike
Zeus anti-missile rocket scored a
"complete success" yesterday in
what Army spokesmen called its
toughest test yet-a low altitude
flight down the Pacific missile
range. The 48-foot solid-fuel "mis-
sile killer" shot to an altitude of
about 40,000 feet, then bent over
and streaked westward.
* * I,
SUNNYVALE, Calif. - United
Technology Corp. yesterday suc-
cessfully test fired a giant solid

fuel rocket engine which company
officials said will give America a
leap forward in the space race
with Russia. The engine generat-
ed nearfy 500,000 pounds of thrust.
It was touched off at UTC's Coy-
ote Test Base.
* * *
VALLEJO, Calif. - The Navy
launched its largest atomic sub-
marine-Plunger-at Mare Island
Naval Shipyard yesterday while a
group of pacifists picketed the en-
trance.
* * *
BATON ROUGE-The Congress
of R a c i a l Equality yesterday
launched an "eat and run" dem-
onstration in Baton Rouge to pro-
test racial discrimination. It call-
ed for the white persons to buy
at, lunch counters reserved for
them and allow Negroes to eat.
The strategy was to flee after the
demonstration.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The United
States Atomic Energy Commission
credited Russia yesterday with
progress toward lighter nuclear
bombs, but said "there is no rea-
son to believe" that the balance of
nuclear power has shifted in her
favor. "This balance," the AEC
said in a statement, "rests not
only on nuclear technology, but
also on numbers of weapons
available and effective system of
delivery."

the more sensitive positions in the
new regime remained unsettled,
but that this would not block a
final settlement.
Informed sources said they ex-
pected the formal announcement
Sunday. By their account a pro-
visional council of state of seven
members would be set up, with
Balaguer at the helm for a limit-
ed period.
Strike Ends
Asked if Balaguer's resignation
was called for in the accord, Dr.
Viriato A. Fiallo, chief of the op-
position National Civic Union 're-
plied;:"necessarily."
On the basis of these reports,
the opposition radio announced
the end of a general strike that
has all but paralyzed the island
nation for 12 days.
La Nacion quoted Balaguer as
saying:
"I lament this lack of serious-
ness, which could lead to a new
impasse in negotiations which, be-
cause of the importance of the
matter involved, should be con-
ducted with honesty and discre-
tion until a definitive accord can
be announced to the nation in an
authoritative and responsible man-
ner."
Peace Bomb
Tes Planned
CARLSBAD, N.M. (-P)-A nu-
clear "peace bomb" is set to ex-
plode today-just 180 miles from
the site of the first wartime nu-
clear bomb in 1945.
This underground blast is a
multi-purpose experiment explor-
ing peaceful potentials for nuclear
explosives, including using the
earth as a chemical test tube.
Named Project Gnome, it is the
first step in the Atomic Energy
Commission's plowshare program
and will be the first explosion
aimed at purely peaceful tasks.
It will be exploded in salt rock-
a new material for such experi-
ments.

Tells World
West Lacks
Superbomb

Claims Rockets Can
Hit Any Spot on Earth
MOSCOW (P) - Soviet Premier
Nikita Khrushchev asserted yes-
terday Rusia has nuclear bombs
of even bigger than 100 megatons
and for the first time seemed to
tell the world the superbomb is a
terror weapon in dealing with the
West.
The rockets that sent Soviet as-
tronauts into orbit can deliver
superbombs any place on earth he
warned.
Declaring the Soviet superbomb
arsenal is ready should war come.
the premier said the Western
powers do not yet have a nuclear
bomb of even 50 megatons and
added:
"The 50 and 100-megaton bombs
will always hang over their heads
like the Sword of Damocles."
Addressed Labor Leaders
His voice sometimes' rising to
a shout, Khrushchev addressed
more than 1,000 labor leaders
from around the world assembled
in the Kremlin for the Congress
of the Communist - dominated
World Federation of Trade Unions.
In a wide-ranging speech, he also
laughed off President John F.
Kennedy's recent proposal for in-
ternational control over supply
lines to West Berlin.
The audience sat icy still when
he uttered his "Sword of Damo-
cles" sentence. This referred to the
ancient Greek tale of the court
flatterer Damocles, forced to sit
at Dionysius table with a sword,
suspended over him. by a single
hair.
But Khrushchev was cheered
repeatedly as he spoke of Soviet
might in world politics with wea-
pons exceeding the equivalent of
100 million tons of TNT.
Use Weapon
"But we shall certainly use this
weapon against the enemy if they
unleash a new war," the premier
added.
(The United States l4as said it
could make a 100-megaton bomb
but it already has bombs capable
of wiping out any military ob-
jective. It considers the super-
bomb a terror weapon against
civilians.)
Again accusing the West of war
preparations and forcing the S-
viet Union to resume nuclear teats
in September, the premier said
"we would be slobbering idiots if
we did' not carry out the nuclear
tests."

Khrushchev Declares
Soit o s s Of 1 00 M egaton Powe'

e

r

CHINA BEARS DOWN:
Katmandu Feels Communist Pressure

f 0

By HENRY S. BRADSHER
Associated Press News Analyst
KATMANDU, Nepal-The pres-
ence of Communist China as a
neighbor of neutral little Nepal
is being increasingly felt in Kat-
mandu.
For years Nepal had faced down-
hill toward its other neighbor, In-
dia, and been almost cut off from
the Chinese across the Himalayas
in Tibet. Now a balance is being
established with the Nepal govern-
ment looking both to New Delhi
and to Peiping.
" Nepalis with a sense of history
say this; is only a return to the
traditional position of their moun-
tain land. But India appears dis-
pleased and some Western ob-
servers are concerned that Nepal
might come under Peiping's in-
fluence.
Two-Way Outlook
The development of Nepal's two-
way outlook was climaxed by the
signing in Peiping Oct. 5 of a
highway agreement. China prom-
ised A 3.5 million pounds sterling
and men and machines to build
the first 'v eular road from Kat-
xnandu to the Tibetan border. .
At present Katmandu is linked
only with India. The road was
built and is still maintained by the
Indian army at Nepal's request,
Officially, yIndia has not com-
mented on the Chinese road. But
the Indian press and some private
groups have taken alarm and
warned of strategic, commercial
and prestige dangers to India.
The Nepali government explains
the road is just a normal part of
trying to develop communications
in this primitive country, an ef-
fort in which the United States,
India and the Soviet Union also
have aid programs. And, Nepalis'

point out, most trade from India
to Tibet passed through Nepal
by mule and human porter before
the British opened aigother route
about 1904. They say a road would
help Nepal recapture part of the
traditional trade to supplement the
present limited border exchanges.
Other Factors
There are probably other factors
for the highway and the generally
closer links between Nepal and
China.'
One is tighter Chinese control
of Tibet. Where Katmandu often
during history had to deal only
with Lhasa, now it has to dea1
with Peiping. British India and
then independent India have had
a large, active embassy here for
a century but China opened an
embassy only in 1959 and Nepal
stationed its first ambassador in
Peiping only this year.
Another factor might have been
a desire to break India's monopoly
on. access to Nepal. The "big
brother" feeling of India for Ne-
pal is strong. At times, in awk-
ward public moves and tactless
priate statements, it has extended
to an Indian attitude of knowing
best for Nepal.
Generally Resented
This is greatly resented by a
sturdy hill people who have proven
their abiltiy to fight for their
independence. Some politicians
have found anti-Indian feeling a
handy tool.
These politicians'\and the ele-
ments they represent now see
China's importance in Nepal ris-
ing toward matching India . im-
portance.
Some opponents of King Mah-
endra, who runs Nepal personally
since jailing an elected prime min-

A NATION OF 8.4 MItLL1N LOCATED IN THE HIMALAYAS, """""""°
NEPAL HAS A DEMOCRATIC CONSTITUTION BUT IS RULED RUCINEETYHS
BY A KING. PRIMITIVE AGRICULTURE SUPPORTS 90 PER BE;NWt t TE
CENT OF THE PEOPLE AND TRAPISPORTATION EXCEPT BY ' EP_.E AD tW RE
H U MA NPO RT R O R P ACK A NIM AL IS S CA RCE . r A Yt O rB " "DtA R rA
t r
:'" _
z~ s
OTY, HKHLEADS
jR M a mANDU S ;:..." .......;..........H...:

~

ister, accuse him of being pro-
Communist. They say he is trying
to get Chinese help to bolster his
throne against those seeking to
force return to parliamentary
democracy.
No one really knows MaheUdra,
a withdrawn man who keeps his
own counsel. But some persons
who have studied him think he
is aware of the dangers of relying
on Communists while possibly
thinking he is clever enough to
use them.
His opponents note that the

former prime minister, B. P.
Koirala,-stalled on Chinese re-
quests to build a road from Kat-
mandu to Tibet. Koirala said there
was no economic justification. The
agreement signed in Peiping says
Nepal asked Chinese help to build
the road.
Koirala was deeply suspicious
of Chin's aims in the Himalayas.
There is a Chinese claim to some
authority over Nepal dating back
to dim, dubious history. Mao Tse-
tung asserted this claim in 1935,
long before he came to power, but

Communist China now has a
treaty of peace and friendship
with Nepal.
There is no indication of sus-
picion of China by King Mahen-
dra's government. Instead, there
are closer and more friendly con-
tacts.
India, with its -own'bitter bor-
der dispute with China unresolved,
is watching the situation closely
without being able to check the
decline in its relative importance
to Nepal. And some Westerners,
always suspicious of the Chinese,
are more openly worried.

.r

challenge
CONCLUDING SEMINAR
"Opportunities for Student
Action in Peace"

MAIN at LIBERTY

Celebrate the

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50th

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anniversary

a group of.
fine Fall and Winter Coats

VOICE
STUDENT PEACE UNION
CONFLICT RESOLUTION CENTER
COMMUNITY ACTION

originally

69.95 and 79.95

AI'12 at

£'

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