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November 29, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NO'

MUSKET To Launch Original Musical

Hold Challenge Election,
Set Colloquium Speakers

MarcIntosh Presents
AL YOUNG

-Daily-Larry Vanice
"LAND $O"-Sailors and stowaway girls dance on the deck of the ship bound to discover the New
World in MUSKET's production of Jack O'Brian's musical comedy. "Land Ho" is being staged in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater tonight through Saturday night with a Saturday matinee. Playwright
O'Brian also plays the lead.

By RONALD WILTON
The members of Challenge
elected new officers and discussed
their coming colloquium and next
semester's program at a meeting
Monday afternoon.
The colloquium will start with
Eugene Rabinowitch, editor of the
Bulletin of Atomic Scientists
speaking on "Alternatives to War
in the Nuclear Age," at 8 p.m.
Friday in the Michigan Union
Ballroom.
Harold Stassen, a former gov-
ernor of Minnesota and onetime
special assistant to President
Dwight D. Eisenhower will speak
at 11 Saturday morning in the
Union Ballroom. His topic will be
"History and Problems of Nego-
tiations."
Arms Control
"Disarmament and Arms Con-
trol," wil be the topic of Abraham
Bargman, a member of the United
Nations Disarmament Study Com-
mission. He will spe'ak at 3 p.m.
Saturday in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the Undergraduate Library.
Robert Osgood, author of the
book "Limited War" will close
the colloquium with a talk on
"Deterrent Theory" at 3 p.m. Sun-
day in the Union Ballroom..
Turning to next semester's pro-
gram, Arnold Taub, '62, newly-
elected spokesman of the program
said "The main theme of next
semester's Challenge program, 'The
Challenge of Higher Education'
will view the relation .of higher
education to a democratic society."
Ralph Kaplan, '63, who was
elected coordinator of the meeting
until February when he will take
over from Taub, explained that
next semester's colloquium will be
coordinated with the Conference
on the University.
Sub-Topics
"We intend to divide the pro-
gram into sub-topics so that those
interested in a particular aspect
of higher education will have the
opportunity to do research and
study in small seminar groups."
"Both the colloquium and the
conference will relate the national
problems of higher education to
the future of the University," he
said.
, Taub also announced that there

will be a mass meeting next week
for all students interested in work-
ing on next semester's program.
Hatcher Notes
Area Potential
Special To The Daily
MILWAUKEE - "We have the
greatest industrial complex in the
world and some of the world's
fine universities to serve as cen-
ters of research," President Harlan
H. Hatcher told a testimonial din-
ner honoring Sen. Alexander
Wiley (R-Wis) Monday.
Describing the potential of the
Middle Western region, Hatcher
noted its value for electronics,
aeronautical, and space industries.
Fifty per cent of all North
American manufacturing is locat-
ed in the Great Lakes area, and
half the continent's argicultural
production comes from the same
region, he said.
"We have the experience, we
have the know-how, we have the
brains. To paraphrase Britian's
wartime leader-'Give us the fa-
cilities and we will do the job
in this age of space,'" Hatcher
said.
He cited the University, which
last year conducted more than
700 government and 'Industry
sponsored research projects valued
at $30 million, as an example of
the research facilities available.
"Other great educational in-
stitutions inrour Great Lakes re-
gion are also engaged in vigorous
research activities," Hatcher noted.
Hatcher paid tribute to Wiley
for his leadership in securing pas-
sage of legislation creating the
Saint Lawrence Seaway.
PHOTOS
by
BUD-MOR
1103 S. Univ. NO 2-6362

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and
The Brown Jug Restaurant
PIZZA Free Delivery PIZZA
Pizza delivered FREE in hot portable ovens.
Real Italian food is our specialty.
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Ending.
Thursday

FR r r

DIAL
NO 5-6290

8:00 P.M. December 7
ANN ARBOR ARMORY
223 East Ann
Tickets 90 cents
Disc Shop, Bob Marshall's, Record Center

New Mexico To Investigate 'Lobo'

the disclaimer affidavit because
it singles out students as special
objects of distrust. Pusey also ex-
pressed his .beliefin the freedom
of universities to govern them-
selves.
* s
EAST LANSING - Michigan
State University students will vote
during registration for winter term
on whether to extend to graduate
students rights and privileges of
student government. Both gradu-
ate and undergraduate students
will vote on the proposal. If the
bill is passed by both groups, it
will take effect two weeks after
the election.
* * *
NEW YORK -Swastikas were
painted recently, on four predom-
inately Jewish fraternity houses
at New York University, Wash-
ington Heights Branch. The cul-
prits also stole plaques and tro-
phies belonging to the fraternities.
An investigation has been launch-
ed to determine the identity of
those involved in the vandalism.
SALT LAKE CITY -- Campus
police aththe University of Utah
stated that a Utah state law
which prohibits persons under 21

from smoking is not being en-
forced at the University. Police
Chief Ernest C. McGarry said
that since the intent of the law
was aimed at those under 18, the
police would do nothing unless
told by the administration to en-
force it.
NEW YORK - The Columbia
University student newspaper,
"The Daily Spectator," will be-
come an independent corporation
in 1962. The present $14,000 sub-
sidy from the university will be
withdrawn. The paper, which is
now distributed free, will be sold
by subscription.

--lso-
PRIZE-WINNING CARTOON "SKI NEW
"MUNRO" HORIZONS"
Friday: BOB HOPE in "Bachelor's Paradise"

I

I

I

WEDNESDAY-1.25 LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THURSDAY- 1.50 DEC. 6-9, 8:30 P.M.
FRIDAY and SATURDAY-1.75 SATURDAY MATINEE
SATURDAY MATINEE-.75 1:30 P.M.
TICKETS AT S. A. B.
NOV. 27-DEC. 1
BOX OFFICE DEC. 4-9
Don't Miss the Gala Opening Night'!

2 -BIG DAYS &NITES-2
SAT. & SUN., DEC. 2 &3.
Featuring
Bobby Darin' s
$150,000 Dream Car
Owned and Designed by Andy Didia

SUMMER
JOBS
EUROPE

*;
*,

Experimental Cars Car of the Future
California Hot Rods * Classic & Antiques
Grand Prix Sport Cars * Dragsters
Big Stage Show & Queen Contest
Exotic Empress - Comanche -Candy Capri

WRITE TO: AMERICAN STUDENT
INFORMATION SERVICE, 22, Ave.
De La Liberte, Luxembourg

YPSILANTI ARMORY

w, 1

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