100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 28, 1961 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTTTi!tMAV 1

T EMC IAWfasTLY: ImT mYw £.1. 1iCLA1' YYVILLYR

!ucks

Stun.

wolverines

__
r

WALKER MOST VALUABLE:
Brown Elected Captain by Teammates

The Inside Corner,
with Dave Andrews
Unhappy Ending
THERE WILL BE A NEW CHANT in the Michigan gridiron camp
next fall. "Avenge the 50."
It's no secret that the Wolverines and Coach Bump Elliott weren't
too happy with Ohio State and Woody Hayes last Saturday as the
Buckeyes poured it on, 50-20. Michigan won't forget easily.
Elliott, obviously bitterly disappointed and disgusted with te
way Hayes held his first string in the game to the end, couldn't find
any justification for the rout. "I don't know what he was thinking
of," said Elliott. "Our boys will have to sleep with those 50 points."
In the other dressing room his counterpart, Hayes, munched a big
red apple and babbled on in Woodyism like a victorious Woody al-
ways does. "Those extra touchdowns won't hurt Michigan. Our boys
deserve the number one spot and if the extra couple of touchdowns
will help them get it so much the better."
Ohio's huge fullback, Bob Ferguson, who had personally ac-
counted for 152 yds. and four touchdowns, simply smiled. Michi-
gan's injured breakaway threat, Bennie McRae, said he wished
"he could have played."
In the press box the writers and TV men alike sort of stood
speechless in wonder at the demolition job they had witnessed. And
on the field and in the stands some 15,000 Buckeye fans from 11
chartered trains and countless cars and buses sung "We don't give
a damn for the whole state of Michigan, we're from O--HI--O."
And well they might have been proud-of their team anyway.
The superb Buckeyes had added the long-gainer to their "crunch-
crunch" machine-special for the Wolverines. Michigan had added a
few more injuries, but with the possible exception of a sunny New
Year's for Ohio the season was over.-
Run Out of Gas,...
ABOUT THE ONLY THING Elliott could be thankful for two days
after Turkey Day was that it was. His tape and bandage crew had
fought valiantly for three quarters; but they ran out of gas and the
healthy Buckeye regulars poured it on.
Ten times Ohio had the ball. Seven times they scored. Once they
were stopped by the halftime gun, once by an interception, and once
by the Michigan team in their greatest offensive show in the 58
game series history. Nothing stopped them in four second half shots.
About the only thing that the Buckeyes didn't carry with
- them were the goal posts, which were successfully defended in a
flurry of fists and tempers by Wolverine partisans at the end.
They even took Woody for a ride-on their shoulders-after he
and Elliott had glared at each other at the center of the field and
exchanged a sharp grab at each other's hand.
In the somber Michigan dressing room, however, the praises for
Ohio State flew freely. "They were a great football team," said El-
liott, "and Ferguson Is the best back in the Conference. But don't
forget that he had a great line blocking for him."
You could call him explosive, but that wouldn't be enough. You
could call him the "Tank" like his teammates do, but he's too fast
for a tank. His 10.3 time in the 100 puts himin the truck class.
Six times he ripped through the Wolverine line for gains of 10
yds. or more. His longest went 25 yds. and only three times was he
stopped for no gain. Not once was he trapped for a loss.
Best Fullback Ever...
"HE'S THE BEST FULLBACK I've ever had here," spouted Hayes.
He's always trying to learn. If he doesn't get the Heisman Trophy
(given to the best college football player of the year) then I don't
know who should."
From anyone else the statements might ring the funny bell. Com-
ing from Woody it's another thing. He makes a habit of collecting
fullbacks and Big Ten titles and vivid remembrances of fellows like
Bob White and Hubert Bobo emphasize what he means.
For Ferguson, who is assured his second straight unanimous All-
American berth, Saturday was sweet revenge. Two years ago here he
stayed on the bench with an injury while Roger Dittrich made the
"cloud of dust" go. Last year at Columbus the Wolverines pretty well
bottled him up.
But despite his greatness, Ferguson wasn't the whole show.
Speedsters Paul Warfield and Bob Klein did their share as did
quarterbacks John Mummey and Joe Sparma. Of the four, only
Klein graduates. Sparma and Warfield will be around for two morel
seasons, which means that they'll make another appearance in
Michigan's touchdown land in 1963.l
It isn't a very comforting thought to Elliott, but at least he canr
be sure that his team can't possibly be in worse physical shape then.
No less than 14 of the 22 men he had counted on as regulars back in
September were hardly healthy Saturday. Beside McRae, guys liket
Wally Herrala, Todd Grant, Joe O'Donnell, Jack Strobel, and Lou
Pavloff didn't even touch a scarlet and white jersey.,
The other eight, Dave Raimey, John Stamos, John Walker, ScottI
Maentz, Paul Raeder, Ken Tureaud, Jon Schopf, and George Mansf
couldn't go full steam.
Stamos was carried off with a head injury; Raimey's legs knottedt
to go along with a shoulder bruise; Maentz reinjured his ankle;
Schopf never did regain full strength after his shoulder separation;t
Tureaud's leg still bothered him; Mans and Raeder both hobbledt
around with injured knees as did gutty John Walker.

G

i"

(Continued from Page 1)

to score untouched. Michigan's
two-point pass failed and the
Wolverines never got closer:
All the Way
Four plays after the kickoff Ohio
State got the touchdown back as
Warfield took a handoff after a
beautiful fake by quarterback
John Mummey and raced 69 yards
to paydirt. Not a man touched the
swift sophomore as a change of
pace and a brilliant fake at the
Michigan 30 left safetyman Mc-
Lenna holding nothing but air.
The Wolverines' return drive,
aided by Tom Prichard's fourth-
down fake punt and run to the
Buckeye 38, wound up at the Ohio
45. Scott Maentz's punt barely
trickled into the end zone. and the
clock stopped the Buckeyes.
Another 'M' Touchdown
Down 21-6, Michigan showed
signs of recovery, marching 78
yards in 15 plays for a third period
TD. Tunnicliff picked up most -of
the yardage on the time-consum-
ing drive, fiinally bulling the ball
to the Buck one. With the drive's
first fourth-down situation, Glinka
faked to the fullback and gave to'
McLenna, who smashed over for'
the score.
Woody Doesn't Kid

A few plays later Warfield made
his key run, cutting inside right
end for 37 yards after a clipping
penalty had placed the Buckeyes
in a second-and-17 position. Fer-
guson drove the final yard on the
second play of the last quarter for
the fourth OSU tally.
Chandler Tries Too
Bob Chandler tried to move
Michigan after Klein's TD, but
met with no success. Ohio State
moved five plays with ease and
Ferguson punched across again to
make it 42-12. The bruising full-
back carried four times, including
his longest gain of the day (25
yards).
The final Wolverine touchdown
came 12 plays after halfback Jim
Ward returned the OSU kickoff to
the Michigan 45, with Ward diving
over for the final one yard and
then adding the two extra points
on another line plunge.
But Ohio State added further
insult to injury by scoring in the
final 34 seconds, following Michi-
gan's kickoff. Sparma lifted a
70-yd. pass to Warfield, who was
stopped on the Wolverine ten by
senior Bill Hornbeck. Three quick
plays later Sparma hit Tidmore
for the TD. Another Sparma-to-
Tidmore toss scored the 49th and
50th points for the Bucks.

By JIM LUTZKE
Michigan's football lettermen
selected end Bob Brown yesterday
to succeed another flanker, George
Mans, as team captain and also
named center John Walker as the
squad's most valuable player.
The Chicago Tribune will an-
nounce the Big Ten award at the
end of the week after all the
schools make their MVP nomina-
tions.
Walker, mostly a defensive mid-
dle linebacker who missed action
in other years because of knee in-
juries, was sorely needed when of-
fensive center Todd Grant's knee

injury put him out of the Ohio
State game.
Brown is the first player in
Michigan football history to fol-
low in his father's footsteps as
captain of the team. Bob Brown,
Sr. was captain and center of
Michigan's 1925 Big Ten cham-
pionship team.
He was named to several All-
America teams while bulwarking
the squad the late coach Fielding
H. Yost often called his finest.
Brown, a second-stringer behind
Scott Maentz, caught six passes
this season, good for 127 yds. and

three touchdowns. Two years ago
as a promising sophomore Brown
was sidelined because of a water-
skiing accident but was granted
another year of eligibility by the
Big Ten.
Last season he played 15 min-
utes, catching three passes for 59
yds. He also lettered in basketball
and is expected to add another to
his collection this winter.
A 22-year-old engineering stu-
dent, Brown won all-state honors
in football and basketball at Kala-
mazoo, where he was also a dis-
trict hurdles champion.'

r7

BOB BROWN
... follows dad

MICHIG

First Downs
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
Total Rushes
Net Yds. Rushing
Passing
Forward Passes Att.
Completed
Intercepted by
Yds. interceptions ret.
Total Plays
Punts
Average distance
Kickoffs (returned by)
Yds, Kicks Returned
Punts
Kickoffs
Fumbles
Ball Lost by
Penalties
Yds. penalized

I1Vft'

24
24

AN OSU
10 22
10 17
6 5
0 0
45 51
162 312
109 200
17 10
10 7
1 2
2 16
62 61
2 1
36 40
7 2
41 63
0 20
41 43
1 0
1 0
4 2
40 20

COLLEGE HOCKEY
Michigan 4, Toronto 1
(See story on page 1)

RUSHING
MICHIGAN
Player Tries Gains Loss Net
Tunnicliff 13 69 0 69
Raimey 10 40 2 38
Glinka 5 17 5 12
Chapman 2 5 0 5
Tureaud 5 14 0 14
Prichard 1 '7_ 0 7
Chandler 2 0 11 -11
McLenna 3 7 0 7
Hood 1 6 0 6
Ward 3 15 0 15
Totals 45 180 18 162
OHIO STATE
Player Tries Gains Loss Net
Ferguson 30 152 0 152
Warfield 6 126 4 122
Mummey 9 40 10 30
Sparma 1 0 3 -3
Klein 4 11 3 8
Katterhenrich 1 3 0 3
Totals 51 332 20 312
PASSING
Att. CoIp. Int. Yds.
Glinka 12 6 2 52
Chandler 4 3 0 40
Dougall 1 1 0 17
Totals 17 10 2 109
Att. Comp. Int. Yds.
Sparma 10 7 1 200
Buckeyes Gain
On .Alabama
By Beating 1M'
By The Associated Press
Unbeaten and untied Alabama
held a slim lead over once-tied
Ohio State today in the next-to-
last Associated Press poll to deter-
mine the national college football
champions.
The Crimson Tide, idle last week
while preparing for a final date
with Auburn Saturday, lost con-
siderable ground to the Big Ten
Buckeyes, who were impressive in
dropping Michigan all the way
from 12th to 20th with a 50-20
triumph.
The top ten, with first-place
votes and season records in paren-
theses (points on a 10-9-8, etc.

GM' Gridders
Cop Honors
Six Michigan football players
received post-season honors yes-
terday.
Bennie McRae and Dave Rai-
mey, both halfbacks, were named
to the 1961 All-Big Ten Team.
Cage Preview
Tonight at 8 in Yost Field-
house Coach Dave Strack pre-
views his varsity basketball
team against a strong freshman
squad which Freshman Coach
Tom Jorgensen considers to be
the best in recent years.
McRae was placed on the first
team and Raimey on the second.
Captain and end George Mans
won a spot on the third team, and
fullback Bill Tunnicliff and end-
placekicker Doug Bickle both made
honorable mention.
McRae received further recog-
nition by being chosen as an All-
American back by the Football
News on its three-deep team.
Senior tackle Jon Schopf also was
named an All-American.
There were three unanimous
choices on the all-Big Ten Team:
fullback Bob Ferguson of Ohio
State, quarterback Sandy Stephens
and tackle Bobby Bell of Min-
nesota.
George Saimes of Michigan
State was the other backfield
member. Aside from Bell, the line
included ends Pat Richter of Wis-
consin and Jack Elwell of Purdue,
tackle Dave Behrman of Michi-
gan State, guards Mike Ingram of
Ohio State and Stan Sczurek of
Purdue and center Larry Onesti
of Northwestern.
Let us style a
COLLEGIATE CUT
Becoming to you!!
10 ARTISTS
NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theater

SPECIAL
CAMPUS PRICES
Post 20 wks. $1.79 f; 35 wks.
$3.15ZQ; yr. $4.00 O
Ladies Home Journal 5 mos.
$1.25 E; 8 mos. $2.00 I;
yr. $2.50 Q
Holiday 5 most. $1.50 Z;
8 mos. $2.40 Q; yr. $3.60 Q
Life 20 wks. $1.99 I;
yr. $4.00 L; 2 yrs. $7.00 Q
Time 27 wks. $1.97 L;
yr. $3.87 Q; 2 yrs. $7.00
Sports Illustrated yr. $4.00 f;
2 yrs. $7.50 Q
Fortune yr. $7.50LI
Arch. Forum yr. $3.25 Q
Newsweek 34 wks. $2.50 E]
yr. $3.00
ON ABOVE PUBLICATIONS
SEND NO MONEY NOW
PUBLISHER WILL BILL YOU
Atlantic 8 mos. $3.00
Hi Fidelity 8 mos. $2.00 Q
Look yr. $4.00 Q
Nation yr. $6.00 Q
Playboy yr. $5.00 Q
New Republic yr. $5.00 Q
New Yorker 8 mos. $3.00 Q
Readers' Digest yr. $2.97 Q
Saturday Review yr. $4.00 QL.
2 yrs. $7.00 L
Scientific American yr. $6.00 Q
U.S. News & World Report
39 wks. $3.67 QI
TV Guide yr. $5.00 Q
STUDENT
PERIODICAL
AGENCY
BOX 1161, ANN ARBOR
For Christmas Rates
Now in effect, Call
NO 2-3061
Days and Evenings

,. .,
, , "+
t
,1, h

'ilnprecede nted ! uahliy
at
'Siaeni Pricei!"

I

I

trict hurdles champion.

fromOur AZiamtnd h4 itihe4in itiA uiaiva

D)IAMOIND

rh f~b%

ROBERT HAACK DIAMOND IMPO RTERS
GEMOLOGiSTS & APPRAISERS

ANN ARBOR

MILWAUKEE MADISON MINNEAPOLIS CARACAS

201 SOUTH MAIN ST. SUITE NO 3-0653
JOHN L. AUSTIN, V-P
* Also a complete selection of LOOSE DIAMONDS and MOUNTINGS of verified quality.

I *ILL.

~

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES
SALUTE: STEVE BANKS

Because of Steve Banks, who just two years ago was an Colorado. His findings shed new light on the source of
undergraduate engineering student, the Bell Telephone noise, and on the important methods of measuring it.
System is closer to wiping out the noise (or "static") that Steve Banks of Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph
sometimes interferes with telephone conversations. Company, and the other young engineers like him in Bell
On one of his first assignments, Steve examined the Telephone Companies throughout the country, help make
noise levels that had "leaked" into telephone circuits in your communications service the finest in the world.
BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES

Sweatshirt Woody?...
"OUR INJURIES hurt us a little more than most people suspected,"
said Elliott, "but we played better'than the score indicates." On
the other side, though feeling no pain (he wasn't even cold. An OSU
sweatshirt under his short sleeved white one belied his appearance)
Woody agreed. "We played our best game, but don't forget that Mich-
igan was hurting. Their injuries hurt them more on defense than they
did on offense."
A quick look back substantiates their conclusions. The Wolver-
ines moved the ball, but unfortunately couldn't contain the Buckeyes.
Michigan's third quarter surge is testimony in itself. "We blocked
better on that drive," said Elliott. "Bruce McLenna (who people will
remember as the guy on the seat of his pants when. Warfield sprinted
past for an Ohio touchdown) did a good job of blocking for (Bill)
Tunnicliff."
The drive ate up 8:26 on the clock, but when the Wolverines
failed on their second straight two point conversion try their
strength was gone. From then on it was just a matter of how much.
The fact that Elliott & Co. shunned the use of placekicking star
Doug Bickle throughout the game gives some indication of the re-
gard the Wolverines had'for the Buckeyes. One couldn't help feeling
that the first two-point conversion try after Raimey's 91-yd. kickoff
return was an attempt for a one point win, IF Michigan could match
the Bucks in touchdown production.
What hurt the Wolverines the most? "Their running and pass-
ing," Elliott quipped. "Seriously though," he continued, "it was their
long gainers." If anything, it seemed to be an understatement. Every-
thing they did hurt.
Ii ONE

basis):
1. Alabama (26) (9-0)
2. Ohio State (21) (8-0-1)
3. Louisiana State (1) (9-1)
4: Texas (9-1)
5. Mississippi (1) (8-1)
6. Colorado (8-1)
7. Minnesota (7-2)
8. Michigan State (7-2)
9. Arkansas (8-2)
10. Missouri (7-2-1)
Other teams receiving

459
452
366
354
272
169
168
139
131
31
votes:

Penn State, Rutgers, Wisconsin,
UCLA, Utah State, Arizona, Pur-
due, Rice, Georgia Tech, Michi-
gan, Duke, Iowa, Syracuse, Wyom-
ing, Kansas.

PHOTOS
by
BUD-MOR
1103 S. Univ. NO 2-6362

Sprechen

Sie

Deutsch?

Whether or not you speak German, you will
thoroughly enjoy a meal at METZGER'S !
Traditional dishes in a continental atmos-
phere.
IMPORTED and DOMESTIC
BEER and WINE
IL I

m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan