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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 22, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WI

Gumperz Describes Indian Tongues

By ISAAC ADALEMO
A University of California ex-
pert Monday took a look at the
welter of languages in the Indian
sub-continent and suggested his
solution to the linguistic tangle.
Prof. John Gumperz began by
contrasting the relatively uncom-,
plex languages of Europe with the
very difficult language problems of
southeast Asia, and then analyzed
India's languages themselves.
The British influence in India
left the English language as the
official language, he said. In addi-
tion to English there is a variety
of native languages.
Concerned with Change
"Nationalism," Prof. Gumperz
said, "has been concerned with a
change in the administrative lan-
guage of India." There is however
no unanimous wish in India about
this change.f
There is a group who want Eng-
lish to remain the official lan-
guage as it is now. Others com-
plain about the adverse effect the
English language has on Indian
customs and therefore want the
official language changed to Hun-
di.
A third group-about 200 mil-
lion people-want a change but
do not support Hindi as the offi-
cial language.
The problem of a national lan-
guage in India is "more of a com-t
petition among tribal groups than
a mere national affair," Prof.
Gumperz said.
Rural Country
"India is a rural yet rapidly
urbanizing country," he contin-
ued. The main problem is how to
develop "a system of linguistic
communication" in this area of
"linguistic multiplicity" which
would enable the government to
pass on information to every citi-
zen.
Prof. Gumperz said a single lan-
guage solution is not, possible.

Talking about the linguistic struc-
ture of India, he mentioned three
strata of communication:
1) The local level restricted to
the villages;
2) The sub-regional dialects, a
compromise understood by all the
villages in the sub-region;
3) Standard languages, none of
which are really popular enough
to be a national language.
He noted several qualities which
might qualify, a standard language
for consideration as a national
language. The foremost of these
is "a command of language loy-
alty." Indians have not developed
Panhel Plans
Mass Meeting
For Rushees
The mass meeting for Spring
Women's Rush will be held Dec.
6, at Rackham Amphitheatre.
There will be two meetings
which will begin at 4:15 and 7:15
p.m.
Panhellenic Rushing Guides will
be distributed at the mass meet-
ing. Assistant Dean of "Women
Elizabeth Leslie, Panhellenic As-
sociation President Susan Stiller-
man, '62A&D, and Lynn Lopata,
'62Ed, chairman of Rushing Coun-
selors, will speak to the group.
Registration for rush will take
place from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Dec. 7-9
in thelHussey Room of the Michi-
gan League. At registration the
$3.00 rushing fee is to be paid.
Also at registration, rushees will
be' given their counselor, group
number and meeting time for the
first rushee -rushing counselor
meeting Dec. 12. Group pictures
will be taken at the meetings.

this language loyalty, Prof. Gum-
perz said.
A further problem is the fact
that "Hindi is a series of dialects
and styles which vary and vary
greatly."
i Prof. Gumperz's suggestions for
solution of the language problem
include the retention of English
as a "language of access,"-a lan-
guage for advanced research work
-while Hindi will be the language
of "popularization" in which lec-
tures will be delivered in the col-
leges and universities.
Prof. Gumperz cited the example
of his own experience during his
graduate studies at the University
when he received lectures in Eng-
lish while his textbook was writ-
ten in German.
In his "system of languages"
proposition Prof. Gumperz finds
a place for the regional languages.
He however explained that in
the system he suggested, only
those who need to do research will
have to learn English.
Educated Language
Hindi will be the language of
the educated, the regional lan-
guages will be an effective means
of communication for the rest of
the nation.
Prof. Gumperz believes that as
urbanization proceeds and better
means of communication develop
dialects will decrease in number
and a national language may
eventually emerge.
"But this is going to be a long
process," he concluded.
Center To Serve
Foreign Students
Formerly the Protestant Foun-
dation, the Ecumenical Campus
Center now provides services to
foreign students of all creeds.
Keith Cooper, '62E, a member
of the center, cited the distribu-
tion of a calendar listing the cam-
pus activities and events available
for foreign students and a coffee
hour at 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. on
Tuesdays and Thursdays respec-
tively as some of the center's serv-
ices.
It also sponsors other activities
which are open to foreign stu-
dents of all creeds but are attend-
ed mainly by Protestants.
These included the construction
of a booth for the World's Fair, a
tour of foreign students to Marys-
ville over Thanksgiving and a re-
treat which centers about an is-
sue-this year to be the cultur1
differences in courtship and sex-
ual customs.
DIAL N056290
ENDING TONIGHT
Two Encore Hits!
as T141:MAN
IN Til!H
S D4W SUIT
AND
IND HEARTS
THURSDAY
A farce about fearless
Astronauts.., in the
British Tradition!
KENNETH MOORE
"MAN IN THE MOON"

LOUIS SLOBODKIN
, . . on children's books

'A

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Views Books
For Youths
By CAROLINE DOW
A successful children's book
represents the total effect of an
idea, illustrations, prayer and
creativity, Louis Slobodkin, crea-
tor of children's books, said yes-
terday.
Children's books are a contem-
porary art form and the influ-
ences of the world affect them
as much as other forms. It is
also a big business as they
amount to one third of the pub-
lished books in the United States
each year.
A book consists of an idea or
subject, generally simple, along
the line of an animal or cinderella
motif. Then the pictures and the
idea must be intertwined into one
mood. A mere difference of a line
can interrupt the mood and this
is where prayer comes in. In mak-
ing the separations for the differ-
exit color plates, an artist can
only pray that the final result
will give the same mood as the
key drawing.
"One can just hope because you
do not know what you are work-
ing for," he said. One of the draw-
backs is that the artist cannot
reach his audience. He must first
go through "Aunt Emma" who
buys the book. Even if the book
is sold out it may not be success-
ful. The only test of a successful
children's book is "a used up
book with raspberry jam sandwich
all over the margins," he said.
Slobodkin draws his material
from his childhood memories and
tastes. "Kids are a stable audi-
ence,", he said. As for publishers,
just keep sending the stories to
new publishers if they are refused,
he recommends. Publishers make
mistakes, too.
'U' Team Wins
Law Contest
A law school team swept the
team and individual honors in
the regional contests of the Na-
tional Inter-Law School Moot
Court Competition held last week-
end in Detroit.
David J. Dykehouse, '62L, Hen-
ry J. Price, '62L, and John B.
Schulyer, Jr., '62L, represented the
University.
Competing, against seven other
teams, the team won a certificate
for the best brief and Dykehouse
won the Tiffany Bowl for the best
oral argument in the final round
of the elimination competition.
The team will participate in
national final arguments to be
held in early December in New
York City.

APO Plans
To Provide
Airport Bus
Willowpolitan, sponsored this
year by Alpha Phi Omega, will
provide four buses to take stu-
dents to Metropolitan and Willow
Run Airports this afternoon.
Bus A will leave from the Mich-
igan Union at noon, arrive at
Mosher-Jordan Halls at 12:15
p.m., Hill Street and Washtenaw
Ave. at 12:30 p.m., Metropolitan
Airport at 1:10 p.m. and Willow
Run at 1:40 p.m. It is the only
bus going to Metropolitan first.
Bus B departs from the Union
at 2:40 p.m. It reaches Mosher-
Jordan at 2:55 p.m., Hill and
Washtenaw at 3:10 p.m., Willow
Run at 3:40 p.m. and Metropolitan
at 4:10 p.m.
Bus C's schedule is: Union at
4 p.m., Mosher-Jordan at 4:15,
Hill and Washtenaw at 4:30 p.m.,
Willow Run at 5 p.m. and Metro-
politan at 5:30 p.m.
Bus D will leave the Union at
5:30 p.m. It will reach Mosher-
Jordan at 5:45 p.m., Hill and
Washtenaw at 6 p.m., Willow Run
at 6:30 and Metropolitan at 7
p.m.
Tickets are available in the
Fishbowl. Fare to Willow Run is
$1.25 and to Metropolitan $1.50.
Buses To Run
Shuttle Service
The City Bus Company will pro-
vide a shuttle bus service between
Main and State Sts. on a trial ba-
sis through January 1. Buses will
run every fifteen minutes between
9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Buses will run at 15 minute in-
tervals between 9:30 a.m. and 6
p.m. The charge will be five cents.
This is only to prevent abuses of
the service since the experiment
will be subsidized by participating
merchants.
DIAL NO 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT
The story ofwha
ourmendidtoa
i..4ndwhatte
towndidtothem!

The popular Gilbert and Sulli-
van operetta, "H.M.S. Pinafore,"
will be presented at 8 p.m. Dec.
6-9 at Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
Cast members are: Evan Ferber, '64;
Dick Hazard, '63M; John Hart, Michael
Baad, '63NR; Steven Taylor, '63; Stev-
en Blanding, '63BAd; Carolyn Klein,
'64M; Laurel Benn, '62; Sioni Schwan-
eke, '64; Jay Cranston, '64; Jack Maier,
'62L; Roger Staples, Grad; Worth Steph-
enson, '63E; Harvey Toles, '63; Karl
Williams. '62; Fred Shippey, '62E; Den-
nis Anderson, '65; Daniel Crampton,
'64; Robert Dahlin, '63; Chris Jones,
'65; David Kilpatrick, '62E; Thomas
Levy, '65; Ronald Sabacek, '63; Curtis
Blanding, '65; Tony Belotti, Nancy Hall,
'65; Sharon Hewitt, '63; Ruth Hahn,
YR's To Present
Red China Debate
The Young Republican Clubwill
present a debate between William
Madden, '65L, and Roger Season-
wein, Spec, on the question of the
admission of Red China to the
United Nations at 7:30 p.m. Nov.
n8, in room 3KLM of the Michi-
gan Union.
The debate. was inspired in part
by the film, "Red China-Outlaw"
sponsored by the Committee of
One Million Against the, Admis-
sion of Red China to the United
Nations.
PROGRAMS
by
BUD-MOR
"We carry a complete line
of HARDING programs"

GILBERT AND SULLIVAN:
HMS Pinafore Names Cast, Crew

I

'49; Joan Lieber, '65; Carole Plamp,
'63M; Rebecca Staton, '64; Eleanor
Winn, '63; Chris Conrad, '63; Brenda
Benskd, '65M; Jennifer McVallgh, Grad;
Elena Radley, '63; Kay Stempliner,
Alisande Staples, Linda Hart, and Julie
Stockwell, '62.-
Tom Jennings, '62, is dramatic di-
rector and Felix Pappalard. '63M, is
musical director.
Orchestra members include: percus-
sion, Bill Curtin, 162M; strings, Sally
Christenson, 162M; Penny Lint, '62M;
Ellen Weatherbee, Sharon Dierking,
'63M; Michael Stulberg, '65; Lana Nail,
'63M; Sam Schultz, '62, and Patricia
Smith, '64M; brass, Roxanne Bates,
'64M; Don Gillis, Jr., '62M; Dave Wol-
ter, '62M; Mitch Osman, '65M,, and
Chuck Marks, '64A&D; woodwinds,
Bob Barris, '65M; John Koljonan, '65M;
Anne Speer, '63M; Pat Cook, '64M;

619
niversity
ivery

Jeanette Hoffman, '64M, and Tom As-
both, '65M.
Members of the stage crew are Phil-
ip Klintworth, '62E, and David Miller,
'62E, technical directors; Joan Glueck-
man, '62, scene designer; Ann Hover,
Ann Laing, and Eugenie weslow, '64,
makeup; and Sue Sautter, '63, props. Ad-
ditional members are: Audri Fortuna,
'63; Toby Berk, '65E; Alan Carr, Ger-
ald Hanley, '65E; Ellen Freedman, '64;
Merrill Crockett, '64A&D;,Ken Burk-
halter, '62E; Martha Frye, '83; Tom
LeMieux, '62; Rhonda Rothenberg, '65;
Arna Fellman, '65; Janet Muth, '63N;
Rita Trager, '63N; Sherry File, '64; Rob-
ert Moss, '62; John Rooks, '63E; Jane
Moore, '62N; Jill Stewart, Gretel Geist,
'64; Ron Brown, Bob Westover, '63;
Frances Lyman. Becky Staton, '64; Nan-
cy Hall, '65; Neil McLain, and Fred
Shippey, '62E.

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..

DIAL 2-6264
20HOWS START AT 1:00
4 710 - Feature starts
10 minutes later

ENDING
SATURDAY

., COLOR by DE LUXE

I Thanksgiving Day ,
ELVIS PRESLEY
in
"BLUE HAWAII"

.I

STARTING SUNDAY

-r

._,

DONAHUE
CONNIE52
STEVENS
McGUIRE
LLOYD _ _
NOLANo ua]
¬ęSo C sYM e" TECHNICOLOR* FROM WARNER RROS.

I

Career Cues:
"This age of specialization
opn, special opportunities
for the well-rounded man!"'
Robert Saudek, President
Robert Saudek Associates, Inc.
"The more specialists society creates to cope with its
complexities, the easier it can be for a non-specialist to
achieve success.
If that seems paradoxical, look at it this way: the more
men who go out for specific positions on the ball club,
the more chance you have to wind up as manager!
Today's world - in government, business, the arts, even
science-needs the well-rounded man. He's the man who

a

U

can see the entire picture...the man who can draw on a
broad background of knowledge, evaluate the problem,
then assign the details to specialists.
The world of entertainment may seem somewhat spe-
cial, but it's a case in point. These days, it demands more
of its people than ever before. Today's musical comedy
score is often as sophisticated as grand opera. Drama
draws heavily on psychology and history. Television pro-
ductions are concerned with nuclear science and political
science.'If you've ever watched 'Omnibus' you may have
seen how our productions have run the gamut of a wide
range of man's interests.
So I suggest to you that even though you may concen-
trate on one special field of interest, keep your viewpoint
broad. Keep your college curriculum as diversified as pos-
sible. Attend lectures and concerts, the theatres and mu-
seums. Above all, read and read, and listen and listen!
But pay scant heed to the oracle who says there's no route
to the top but that of specialization. I don't believe itl"

I

I

r I
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
announces
PETITIONING for a STUDENT MEMBER
COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP IN
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
PETITIONS and detailed information about the Committee are now available from
the Administrative Secretary, Student Government Council, Student Activities Building.
PETITIONS ARE DUE FRIDAY, DEC. 1 AT 5 P.M.
THE COMMITTEE consists of 4 student members appointed for one year terms and 3
non student members appointed for 2 year terms. The Committee advises Student
Government Council on the enforcement of the following regulation (adopted in May,
1960.)

I

"All recognized student organizations shall select membership
and afford opportunities to members on the basis of personal
merit, and not race, color, religion, creed, national origin or
ancestry."

, _ r. _ _ _ _

........-..w

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