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November 17, 1961 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

xE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17. 1 gRl

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F 1 t

Panel Views
International
Travel Plans
By NEIL COSSMAN .
With careful planning and little
Or no insistence on the comforts
of home, students can get an in-
expensive and rewarding first-
hand look at the world, a panel
decided yesterday.
The panel or student travelers
discussed a variety of ways to see
the world - from independent
jaunts through Europe to rigidly-
guided tours. The panel drew a
sharp line between programs
which allow a student to live with
a family in countries and those
which give him an extensive tour
of several countries.
Among the former type is the
Experiment in International Liv-
ing, which includes trips to Asia
and Africa, in addition to Europe.
By enabling a student to live-
with a family for several weeks
the Experiment aims at promot-
ing person-to person international
relations.a
Program Includes
Costing from $450-$1200, the
program usually includes a week
for independent travel and an
extensive tour of the country.
Similar to this type of program
are those in which a student works
in one country. Road and farm
work, nursing and camp work are
among the kinds of jobs avail-
able.
The major problem in these
programs, the panel noted, is one
of adjustment-in many cases to
the family itself, as well as to the
food and customs.
Advantage of Work
The main advantage of work
and family living programs is that
a student gains a deeper knowledge
and a closer feeling for a particu-
lar people and country. With the
work program there is a con-
siderable reduction in costs be-
cause of the money earned in the
country visited.
Many students choose a second
way to travel-visiting many coun-
tries in a period of several weeks.
Among the disadvantages of
such tours mentioned by the panel
are not getting to know a country
very well and becoming exhausted
by the speed and length of the
trip.
Extensive Tour
An extensive tour does, however,
offer a broad, over-all picture. The
panel recommended it as a first
trip to those planning return
visits.
Independent travel can also be
the least expensive way for a
student to see, Europe.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
Defeated: To grant approval to the
following student sponsored event as
an open activity: Dec. 9, East Quad-
rangle Council, "Snowflake Ball," East
Quadrangle, 9:00 p.m. According to Uni-
versity regulations, the Council cannot
approve such an activity by a housing
unit.
Adopted: That the Council appro-
priate $200.00 from the General Coun-
cil funds for the purpose of publishing
a general information booklet describ-
ing Student Government Council. This
project shall be supervised by the
Public Relations Director. The Admin-
istrative Vice-President shall report on
the progress of the booklet. Final ap-
proval of the form and content of the
booklet mast be secured from the Coun-
cil before final printing and distribu-
tion.
Referred: (To the Committee on Stu-
dent Activities) The question of Coun-
cil sponsorship of Homecoming. The
committee is to meet with the appro-
priate people and report back , to the
Council.
Elected: As officers of the Council,
for terms ending with the next Coun-
cil election:
President: Richard Noh
Executive vice-President: John Mar
tin
Administrative Vice-President: Rob-
ert Ross
Treasurer: Steve Stockmeyer.
Adopted: To extend the temporary
recognition of Voice Political Party for
one month referring the matter to the
Committee on Student Activities with
the recommendation that Article III
of the Voice Constitution be clarified
with respect to the meanings of the
"principles" of Voice.
Adopted: Concerned with the pres-
sures to conformity caused by non-
academic evaluations in the women's
residence halls, the lack of specialized
knowledge on the part of those who
make them out and the invasion of
privacy which they represent, Student
Government Council expresses its dis-
approval of the non-academic evalua-
tion forms andeprocedures used in the
women's residence hals. The Council
recommends that the present forms and
procedures be discontinued, that a pro-
cedure be set up through which stu-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Baha' Student Group, Meeting &
Discussion-Open to all, Nov. 17, 8 p.m.,
418 Lawrence. Call NO 3-2904 for in-
formation & transportation.
* * *
Congr. Disc. E & R stud. Guild, Lun-
cheon Discussion-Prof. D. Stokes:
"American Democracy-IS IT?" Noon;
Mrs. K. Bouding: "Implications of
Peace Vigils & Other Protests on World
Nuclear Policy," 7:30 p.m. Nov. 17,
802 Monroe.
* * *
International students Assoc., Square
Dance, Nov. 18, 8:30 p.m., WAB.
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Nov. 17,
7:30 p.m., 1040 Nat. Resources Bldg.
Speaker: Robert Eastman, Missionary-
Linguist.
* * *
Baptist Student Union, Bible Study,
Nov. 17, 5 p.m., 3532 SAB.
* * *
Newman Club, Square Dance "Hill-
billy Howl," Nov. 17,8:30-11:30 pm.,
Newman Ctr.
Maximum
two-day service
for
Bike. Repairs
Guaranteed
at BEAVER'S
605 Church Street

dents can, at their option, have un-
structured evaluations submitted by a
limited number of faculty members
and/or administrative officials, who
know the student outside the class-
room and who are chosen by the stu-
dent; that these evaluations be used
solely to enable appropriate officials to
write references for prospective em-
ployers, for other universities, and be
used by the academic counselors when
so requested. This opinion shall be
conveyed to the Office of the Dean of
Women, Office of Student Affairs Study
Committee, and other appropriate
groups.
Adopted: To take from the table the
motion tabled last week on expression
of student opinion (Croysdale).
Postponed: Consideration of the
Croysdale motion, until next week.
Adopted: Student Government Coun-
cil mandates its Committee on Stu-
dent Concerns to study the constitu-
tional status of higher education in
Michigan, particularly that of the Uni-
versity of Michigan, and bring back
proposals to the Council for its con-
sideration.
Adopted: The Council mandates its
Committee on the University to study
all judiciary councils, e.g. Joint Judi-
ciary, Women's Judiciary, Women's
Panel, Interquadrangle Council Judi-
ciary, IFC Executive Committee, the
three quadrangle judiciaries, women's
dormitory judiciaries, quadrangle house
judiciaries, and to thereby assume all
functions of the former SGC Joint Ju-
diciary Study Committee. This commit-
tee shall look into at least the follow-
ing areas:
1) Procedural and substantive due
process granted to those brought be-
fore any judiciary council because of
alleged violations of University regu-
lations.
2) Theoretical and actual relationship
of the judiciary councils to the Office
of the Dean of Men and Dean of Wom-
en, the Subcommittee on Discipline and
Committee on Student Conduct, and
other administrative personnel involv-
ed with student conduct.
That the minutes of the Joint Judi-
ciary Study Committee be released to
the ,Committee on the University.
'The following student sponsored social
events are approved for the coming
weekend. Social chairmen are remind-
ed that requests for approval for so-
cial events are due in the Office of
the Student Affairs not later than 12
soon on the Tuesday prior to the
event:
NOV. 17-
Alpha Phi Omega, Record Dance;
Chi Omega, Party; Phi Sigma Kappa,
Record Dance; Pi Lambda Phi, Hood-
lum Party; Wenley, Dance.

NOV. 18-
Acacia, Party; Alpha Chi Sigma, Beat-
nik Party; Alpha Delta Phi, Beatnik
Party; Alpha Sigma Phi, Record Dance;
Alpha Tau Omega, Party; Beta Theta
Pi, Band Dance; Chi Phi, Party; Chi
Psi, Dance; Delta Chi, Band Party; Del-
ta Delta Delta, Pancake Supper; Delta
Sigma Delta, Dance; Delta Gamma
Sorority, Open-Open House; Delta Tau
Delta, Dance; Delta Theta Phi, Open
House; Delta Theta Phi, Band Party;
Delta Upsilon, Hawaiian Luau; Evans
Scholars, Pajama Party; Gomberg,
Lounge Dance & Open House;
Kappa Sigma, Record Party; Kelsey,
Lounge Dance; Michigan, West Quad,
Hayride; Nu Sigma Nu, Dance; Phi Al-
pha Kappa, Square Dance; Phi Delta
Theta, Dance; Phi Epsilon Pi, Hayride;
Phi Kappa Sigma, Party; Phi Rho Sig-
ma, Dance Party; Psi Upsilon, Party;
Reevesand Scott, Fall Dance & Open
Open; Phi Kappa Psi, Dance;
Sigma Chi, Party; Sigma Phi Epsilon,
House Party; Sigma Phi Society, Rec-
ord Dance; Tau Delta Phi, Ballroom
Party; Tau Epsilon Phi, Tepee Party;
Taylor, Sock Hop; Theta Chi, Record
Dance; Theta Delta Chi, Dance; Theta
Xi, Monte Carlo Pary; Trigon, Sadie
Hawknis; Van Tyne, Sock Hop; Zeta
Psi, Toga Party; Phi Delta Phi, Open
House & Dance.
Approval for the following student-
sponsored activities becomes effective
twenty-four (24) hours after the pub-
lication of this notice. All publicity for
these events must be withheld until the
approval has become effective.
Nov. 22
Alpha Phi Omega, Willopolitan Bus
Service to Airports, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Cam-
pus to Willow Run and Detroit Metro-
politan Airports.
Events Saturday
FOLK MUSIC
For the SWINGINGEST
evening of folk music in
Ann Arbor, come and
hear the NEW LOST
CITY RAMBLERS tomor-
row at 8:30 at the Ar-
mory, 223 E. Ann.
Tickets $1.25 at the
Disc Shop, Union, Record
Center, and at the door.

Doctoral Recital: Beula Eisenstadt
will present a recital Sat., Nov. 18, 8:30
p.m., in Lane Hall Aud., in partial ful-
fillment of requirements for the de-
gree Doctor of Education. She will
play the compositions of Mozart, Ra-
vel, and Schumann. Open to the public.
Placement
Beginning the week of November 20,
1961, the following schools will be
at the Bureau to interview candidates"
for the second semester.
MON., NOV. 20-
Dearborn, Mich. (Fairlane Sch. Dist.
No. 2)-Typing; Grade 1, 2, 3 & 6.
TUES., NOV. 21-
Mt. Clemens, Mich. - Kdg., Early
Elem., Late Elem.; Jr. HS Girl's PE,
Sc., Math.
WED., NOV. 22-
East Detroit, Mich.-Jr. HS Engl., HS
Chem.
For appointments and information
contact the Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, NO 3-1511, Ext. 3547.
POSITION OPENINGS:

Management Consultants-Client firm
in Illinois with worldwide mkt, in
pressure sensitive tapes, coatings, &
adhesives. Openings for: Production Re-
search Group Leader-BS or MS in
Chem.; Process Development Engnr.--
BS or MS in Chem. or Mech. Engrg.;
& Quality Control Specialist-BS in
Mech. or Chem. Engrg.
Armstrong, Lancaster, Pa. - Non-
Technical openings: Sales; Accounting;
Adv., Promotion & Public Relations;
Credit Mgmt.; Personnel; and Produc-
tion Planning. Technical openings:
Chemist; Engineers; Ceramic Engnr.;
and Physicists.
Chrysler Automotive Engrg. Div.,
Highland Park, Mich. - Automotive
Safety Research & Development. Re-
cent grad with BS in Engrg. or Sci-
ence major. Exper. not essential but
must have training or ability for mak-
ing effective verbal presentations. Al-
so several openings for grad Chem.
Engnrs. & Metallurgical Engnrs.
Metal Products Co. in Mich. - Service
Manager with Bachelor's-Engrg. bkgd.;
tecigin industrial art field. Ver-
bal exper. in writing as well as in
speaking. Also exper. in automotive or

farm implement lines in training or
service work.
Please*call General Div., Bureau of
Appts., 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544 for further7
information.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE: 212
SAB:
Wel-Mets Camps of Narrowsburg, N.Y.
are looking for men & women from
the states of N.Y., N.J., Conn., and
Pa. All types of camp jobs.
Attention: Women students from the
St. Louis Area. Vandervoort's of St.
Louis is interested , in College Board
tryouts during Christmas holidays.
Come to Summer Placement Service
for further information.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 SAB: Monday thru
Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p m.

,

Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Jack Lardie, at
NO 3-1511 ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MEN
1-Busboy, 11:00-2:00, five days per
wreek, also Sat. & Sun,
-Salesmen, sell china & silverware,
commission basis.
-Salesmen to sell college sportswear
for men.
1-Engineering student, must be at
least a junior, background in ra-
dio-isotope.
-Several salesmen to sell magazine
subscriptions.
FEMALE
1-Baby sitting, light housekeeping, 8
a.m.-12 noon, Monday thru Thurs-
day.
2-Fountain sales work, 4-10:30 p.m., 5
days per week, four hours on Sat-
urday.
1-Waitress, Friday & Saturday eve*
nings, 12 noon-8:00 p.m. Sunday.
1-Full-charge housekeeper, babysit-
ter. Live in.

I

:Iil' 'h

li'll

SID's a grimet, Sid's no toy,
Sid's the id of'a grown-up boy;
A snide idea of the inner you,
An ear to tell your troubles to.
A Freudian friend to share
psychoses,
A safety valve for your neuroses.
An effigy to stick with pins,
A fellow rogue who loves your sins.
A head with eyes and feet,
no kidney;
A ball of fur.-a Snid named
Sidney.
$2.00
Sid, the Snid
Copyright
ARTISANS
1122 South University

33 E~ER EUUNIVERSITY
HAWAII SUMMER
SESSION.
6 UNIVERSITY CREDITS AVAILABLE
56 DAYS.ani $569 rxs.
Earn university credits while enjoying
summer in Hawaii. Price Includes steam.
ship outbound, jet return to West Coast
Wilcox Hall residence on campus, an4
greatest diversification of parties, din-
ners, entertainment, sigftseeing
cruises, beach events, and cultural
shows; plus necessary tour services.
Air or steamship roundtrip, and Waikiki
apartment-hotel residence available at
adjusted tour rates. Optional neighbor
island visits and return via Seattle
World's Fair.
ORIEN TOUR
SAN FRANCISCO STATE COLLEGE
6 CREDITS-UNIV. SUMMER SESSION
79 DAYS only, $2298
A new concept of study tours, a bona.
fide university program. Also, with us
you enjoy and "live in" the Orient-
not just see it. Includes Hawaii, Japan,
Formosa. Philippines, and Hong Kong.
Price is all inclusive, with services
ashore all first class throughout. Eve-
ning events are just as important as
daytime sightseeing. We challenge
comparisons. Ask for our 16-page bro-
chure for valuable Orient information.

PARTY
FAVO RS
by
BUD-MOR

"Tareyton's Dual Filter in duos partes divisa est!"......il........
says veteran coach Romulus (Uncle) Remus. "We have a
saying over at the Coliseum -'Tareyton separates the gladia-
tors from the gladioli'. It's a real magnus smoke. Take it
from me, Tareyton delivers de gustibus -and the Dual Filter yU §Vt
does it"
.D-LFIL R
Tarcyton,
- Frcdud of ,. r~~~~ea c/vu~aeaaoa-«/vceuormident !' w

Applyt
MRS. E. STRACHAN
1415 Cambridge Rd.
7 Ann Arbor
NO 5-95

s

103 S. Univ.

NO 2-6362

A

The
CHUCK WAGON
LUNCHES and DINNERS
FINE SALADS and SANDWICHES
Specializing in Roast Beef
Serving Wines and Beers from all over the world
QUICK LUNCH SERVICE
recommended by Duncan Hines and Gourmet
CATERING SERVICE AVAILABLE
OPEN 7 DAYS

El - ' _. - -

ENJOY
THIS V

A

GOOD,

MEAL

I

I

i

I

2045 Packard Hours 11 A.M.-9 P.M.
LARRY DAVIS, Proprietor

NO 2-1661

DEL, RIO0 BAR
Freshly Remodeled - New Management
Beer, Wine, Liquor and Cocktails

~1

ur aiJa
,gonlan¢n a/Qininq

I-

Specializing in Delicious Pizza Pie

Sandwiches

FREE PIZZA DELIVERY
from 6:00 P.M. Till Closing Hour

Phone NO 2-9575

122 W. Washington

i

(EEKEND
0 0
Enjoy the Finest
CANTONESE 0
oD Fr

When Important People come to town
... highlight their visit with luncheon or dinner at the
Corner House - where food, service and surroundings
meet your every wish. Tuesday through Saturday. 11:30
to 2:00 and 5:30 to 7:30. Sunday: Dinner, 12:00 to
3:00. May we suggest that you
telephone for reservations?
VMe Coriter Nowe
S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
A block west of Rackham Bldg.--NO 8-4054
.
-
A "" a i, "ir r .

341 S. Main St.

NO 3-2401

I

Incomparable cuisine from around the world
in a warm and intimate atmosphere

SPECIALTIES:

International Dishes, Live Lobster, Steaks
Sea Food, Poultry,-Homemade Desserts.

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish
JPIZZA
will be served daily from

SMORGASBORD
WEDNESDAY 6:00 to 10:00 P.M.

FRESH
WHOLE
LOBSTER

I

LUNCH:

Monday Through Friday:
4 Businessmen's Buffet Lunches and a rich
menu at 11:30 A.M.

FINE
SEAFOOD

I

I

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