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November 16, 1961 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-16

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THE MICII[IGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER :

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER

7 Offense, Defense Opposite of Year Ago

BIG TEN SHORTS:
Line Injuries Hamper MSU

By TOM WEBBER
ou may not know it, but the
higan team you're watching
y Saturday is almost the
t opposite of the team you
last year-statistic-wise, that
ast year Michigan grabbed two
nctions in the final Big Ten
Lstics. The biggest laurel ws
of having the most tens-
s defense. Last year's Wolver-
defense allowed the fewest

points per game, the fewest yards,
the fewest yards per play, and,
well just about the fewest of
everything.
The other distinction, or a more
dubious nature, was that of hav-
ing the most impotent offense in
the league (Indiana was on pro-
bation and didn't count.) Minne-
sota averaged 12 fewer yards per
game, but also averaged 'eight
fewer plays per game. Thus went
to Michigan the unique pleasure

of gaining the fewest yards per
play of the Big Ten teams, man-
againg a woeful 3.4q yard average.
The situation this year, however,
is, as the saying goes, a horse of
a different color.
The Michigan offense, although
basically the same personnel as
last year, has suddenly blossomed
into an offensive threat. The Wol-
verines have already scored 22
more points in four Big Ten games
as they did in six last year, and
that with a shut-out against Mich-
igan State.
They are averaging 50 more
yards a game than last year and
only one other team, Ohio State,
Mais Cops
MYP Over.
Teammate
By The Associated Press
BOSTON - Roger Maris was
voted the most valuable player
in the American League yesterday
by members of the Baseball Writ-
er's Association of America.
The Yankee slugger won the
honor for the second straight year
by nosing out teammate Mickey
Mantle by four points in the vot-
ing.
,A first-place vote was worth 14
points, a second-place vote nine
points, third-place eight points
and so on.
Seven Firsts
Maris received seven first-place
votes and wound up with 202
points. Mantle received six first-
place votes and finished with 198a
points. Last year Maris beat'
Mantle by three points, 225-222.
Jim Gentile of the Baltimore
Orioles finished third, gathering
157 points while the Detroit Tigers'
Norm Cash, the American League
batting champion, placed fourttl
with 151 points.
Led League
Maris not only hit more home
runs than any player in histor,
but led the league in the very
vital department of driving in
runs. He wound up with 142 RBI's;
-probably the most destructive
.269 hitter in baseball annals.
Maris did not break Babe Ruth's
mark in the required 154 games,,
but he came close enough to push
almost everything else on the
nation's sport's pages into a sec-
ondary role.

has averaged more yards per play Practice Notes
than the Wolverines. By The Associated Press
The big surprise this year, and Coach Bump Elliott drilled his EAST LANSING - Two of the
also the biggest disappointment, is team long and late yesterday, as Michigan State starting linesmen
the defense. The offense has been he continued to prepare for the are counted out of the meeting
scoring points at a new high, the Iowa invasion. The Michigan units with Northwestern here Saturday,
defense has also been letting them alternated on defense and offense both because of ankle sprains.
in at a new high rate. Only three yesterday, with the redshirts pro- Ed Budde, who plays pulling
teams, Indiana, Illinois and Wis- viding the opposition in'each case. guard on the offense, is being
consin, have allowed more points The team stayed out until after replaced by Steve Mellinger, a
per game than Michigan. The dark for the second day in a 195-pound sophomore. Defensive
Wolverines average is a whopping row. Both Ken Tureaud and Jon specialist Wayne Fontes also is not
17.8 per game. Schopf worked out with the team expected to be ready for full
They have allowed as many again yesterday. service.
points in the four games this year __________________________________
than six last year.
Lead in Fumbles
The high oposition point total
can be described somewhat by then
fact that the Wolverines also lead
the Conference in fumbles lest, by Brian MacClowry
averaging two a game.b
Coach Bump Elliott also has
a theory. "We just don't have as
good defensive personnel as la,,t
year. We had some players last' vy Com es H om e
year who played nothing but de-
fense. Bill Stine, Gary McNitt, IT WAS 21 YEARS AGO when football fans over the nation
Reid Bushong and some others were singing the praises of the greatest halfback in Michigan history.
did a good job for us on defense His name-was Tom Harmon and he ran out of the tailback slot in the
last year. Some fellows who play- single wing.
ed on the raiders and then played The single wing, for you undergraduates, was a horse and buggy
defense last year are playing of- offense that placed the tailback and fullback some five yards behind
fense this year. We also have more the line of scrimmage with knees bent and hands thrust forward in a
guys playing both ways than e manner that suggested they were waiting for someone to shove a chair
"We've been doing more multiple underneath them so they could sit down. It was discarded in 1959,
ball handling this year, too, which along with our national ranking. You may still find a replica of it in
might explain some of the fum- the Kelsey Museum.
bling," he added. The key to the single wing attack was the blocking back, who
Last year it was a question of stationed himself close behind one of the guards. His job was to
whether the defense could hold knock down anyone who came near the tailback-in Harmon's
the score down enough so Michi- case-friend or foe. In 1940 Harmon's hatchet man was a raw
gan could win the game. Now with boned kid who hit so hard they nicknamed him Forest Evashevski.
two offensive powerhouses, Iowa The name stuck, although nowadays he's just called Evy.
and Ohio State, the question be-
comes whether the offense can Michigan only had six plays that year. Harmon over guard, Har-
outscore the opposition. mon off tackle and Harmon around end-run to both sides. And on
-_- every play the big kid from Detroit was right in front of him, getting
the bruises while Harmon got the touchdowns. Harmon stayed so close
LSU Sa ys N to Evashevski six games went by before someone found out he didn't
have four legs. When Harmon graduated the University retired his
bl 1 number. When Evashevski graduated they washed his. Evy spent so
much time on the ground it was the first time in three years people
rnt.7 n -.,or...,.,,o knew he had one.

AL-

.Fontes was coach Duffy Daugh-
erty's nomination for "Spartan
of the Week" for his defensive
play against Purdue. This means
team captain Ed (Rocky) Ryan,
still bothered by a shoulder in-
jury, will be called upon for extra
duty.
Dave Behrman, the big center-'
tackle is still trying to shake off
a back sprain, but expects to be
in there. Behrman wants to keep
up his present record as the lines-
man with the longest playing time.
* * *
MINNEAPOLIS - The Min-
nesota Gophers held rugged con-
tact drills again yesterday pre-
paring -the squad for the study
in fundamentals Saturday's game
with Purdue is expected to pro-
vide.
Both teams- play close-to-the-
vest, make-your-own-breaks foot-
ball and Minnesota coach Murray
Warmath chose again to risk in-
juries to sharpen Gopher block-
ing and tackling.
The only doubtful starter ;s
right end Bob Deegan, taking
treatments for an inflamed elbow.

If he doesn't pay, junior John
Campbell of Wadena will step into
his slot.
EVANSTON -- Sophomore
quarterback Tom O'Grady, who
has been used exclusively on of-
fense, may be on defense for
Northwestern as well at Michigan
State Saturday, coach Ara Par-
seghian indicated yesterday. 0'-
Grady, who will start the game on
offense, was on =defense for the
first time in a scrimmage yester-
day. He shared the spot with
junior halfback Chuck Brainerd.
They replace defensive specialist
Al Kimbrough who will miss the
game with an ankle injury.
** *
COLUMBUS - Third-ranked
Ohio State rolled through another
good workout yesterday but the
hour and 45-minute session took
its toll.
Defensive middle guard Wayne
Betz, a junior from Cuyahoga
Falls, sprained his ankle and is
the Buck's only doubtful starter
when they meet Oregon here
Saturday.

#'

"t '

I

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
ANOTHER TD?-Michigan's Dave Raimey skirts left end for
good yardage against Duke. Raimey is one of the reasons Michi-
gan has had an offensive reversal in form from last season.
He is fourth in scoring in the Big Ten. Duke's Mike Rappold
is the man trying to stop him.
McRae Second in Rushing;
Szyk OWVny Leads Pas sers
o/ ./

NEW ORLEANS C.P - For once
and all, irrevocably and to remove
all doubts, Louisiana State's foot-
ball team will not be in the Sugar
Bowl game in New Orleans on New
Year's Day.
This was the edict from theT
campus at Baton Rouge yesterdayt
to clarify any doubts that might
exist in the minds of an incredu-
lous sports population in New
Orleans.
Representatives of Lousiana
State University have assured
commissioner Tom Hamilton of
the Big Five that there would be
no racial problem if LSU is invitedr
to the Rose Bowl.

By TOM ROWLAND
Michigan's fifth-place Wolver-
ines, sporting an even-up 2-2
mark, head toward Saturday's
Iowa encounter with a complete
backfield quartet among the Big
Ten statistical leaders.
Helmsman Dave Glinka ranks
sixth among the conference quar-
terbacks, having connected on 24
of 46 aerial attempts to boost the'
Toledo junior past the .500 mark,
Get with it, man!You belong
in traditional
Post-Grand
Slacks

Speedster Bennie McRae's 5.4
yards per carry is tied for second
while the Wolverine halfback's
total 244 yards ranks sixth. Full-
back Bill Tunnicliff is twelfth

Iwith

1'74 Yards for 8.8 Yardsz a

carry.
Rainmey High Scorer
Dave Raimey, the other half of
Michigan's halfback scoring duo,
lips tallied for four six-pointers
this fall, setting him into fourth,
place among the Big Ten scorers.1
Michigan end Scott Maentz is
second in punting, with an aver-.
age 39.8 yards per boot. Jim Bak-.
ken, Wisconsin quarterback, is
first with a 41.0 yard average.
The Wolverines' pass d "ense
fortifications will be under strong
attack Saturday as Iowa's Matt
Szykowny comes to town as the,
Big Ten's leading passer. Szy-
kowny has hit targets on 59 of
104 attempts for a healthy .567
percentage.
Ferguson Leads
Ohio State's Bob Ferguson paces
the groundgainers, grinding o it
519 yards without a single nega-
tive yard in the rushing column.
In the process Ferguson has lug-
ged the pigskin for five touch-
downs, tieing the OSU fullback
with Michigan State's G:iorge
Saimes for scoring honors.
Sandy Stephens, Minnesota All-,
American quarterback candidate
leads the Big Ter in total of fens(e
with an average 5.8 yards per
play. Stephens ranks third in pass-
ing, second in rushing, and
eleventh in scoring.
Stephans has gained 810-yards
both passing and running. On the
ground he has gained 278-yards,
and has completed 32 passes in 85
attempts for 527 yards. Ferguson
of Ohio State is fourth in total]
offense without having even
thrown a pass.
PROGRAMS
by
BUD-MOR
"We carry p complete line
of HARDING programs"

GRID SELECTIONS
Grid Picks contest are that you don't want to see your name in
the paper or win two free tickets to the Michigan Theater, now
showing "Town Without Pity."
Even more important, though1, is that you don't want to cause
u- sc much trouble and make us correct all those entries, espealiyt
when nobody wants to help mark them.
So don't enter this week's contest. Don't include the Michiga n
score to settle any ties and don't send in your picks by Frid~iy
midnight to Grid Picks, Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor.
Really, no kidding, don't.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES
1. Iowa at MICHIGAN (score) 11. Wake Forest at Maryland
2. Northwestern at Michigan 12. Colorado at Nebraska
State 13. Syracuse at Notre Dame
3. Purdue at Minnesota 14. Southern California at
4. Oregon at Ohio State Pittsburgh
5. Illinois at Wisconsin 15. Yale at Princeton
6. Indiana at West Virginia 16. Texas A&M at Rice
7. Georgia Tech at Alabama 17. Mississippi at Tennessee
8. Oklahoma at Army 18. Texas Christian at Texas
9. Cornell at Dartmouth 19. Washington at UCLA
10. North Carolina at Duke 20. Utah State at Utah

Take's Coaching job .
N 1941 EVASHEVSKI finally got out from under the Harmon shadow.
He took the head coaching job at little Hamilton College in Clinton,
N.Y., where he compiled a respectable 5-2 record. But with the coming
of World War II, Evashevski left Hamilton for military service.
lie was not to become a head coach again until 1950, when he
accepted the post at Washington State College. Evy's reasoning
was that if he could get some of those big, backwoods boys to stop
rolling logs long enough to go to college he'd have, If not the best,
at least the strongest team in the nation.
But things didn't work out that way, and Evy finished with only
an 11-6-2 record for two years. Nobody really seemed to care though.
The students didn't even bother to hang him in effigy. In fact, many
of the students didn't even know what the word meant. When they
throw a rope over a tree in Washington it's not for such a menial
thing as losing a football game. They reserve that for people who
throw lighted cigarettes out car windows. And Smokey the Bear springs
the trap.
Accepts Iowa Post .. .
'O NOBODY really objected when Evashevski left Washington State
in 1952 to accept the head coaching position at Iowa. When Evy
arrived Iowa was only famous for two things, corn and Jean Seberg.
The difference being that one grew up and the other out. Evy swiftly
became noted for his tough practice sessions. He was determined to
bring Iowa out of a 20-year slump. When Evashevski scheduled a head
knocking session the players soon realized he meant without helmets.
Evashevski's conception of a helmet was something you used dur-
ing a game to protect what you might need to get through school.
Evy's teams soon became the scourge of the Big Ten. By the
time he retired at the end of last season to become athletic director
his Iowa teams had won 52 games, won 27 and tied four. His 1956
and 1958 teams won the Big Ten title and the Rose Bowl games,
and in 1960 the Hawkeyes shared the title with Minnesota.
To say Evashevski is revered in the corn country is an under-
statement. After the last speech he gave in Des Moines, 34 people
came forward to make their decision for Iowa. A heretic in Iowa is
someone who doesn't like the wing T.
The Iowa team that comes to Ann Arbor Saturday will be coached
by Jerry Burns. But don't be mistaken. Despite the losses it's still a
Forest Evashevski recruited club.

A4

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YOUR PERSONAL SELECTION INVITED

Pro Standings
NIM
W L T Pts. GF
Montreal 9 4 2 ?0 59
Toronto 9 5 1 19 46-
New York 7 5 4 18 50
Detroit 5 7 3 13 40
Chicago 4 7 5 13 36
Boston 3 9 4 9 44
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Toronto 3, Montreal 2
Chicago '2,Detroit 0
TONIG T'S GAMEI
Mon treal at Hoston

GA
41
36
44
48
41
64

NBA
WESTERN DIVISION
W L Pet. GB
x-Los :Angeles 10 2 .833: -
C;incinnati 8 5 .615 2~
Dtroit 4 7 .36i3 51'
St. Louis 5 9 .357 514
x-Chicago 2 9 .182 7
EAsTERN DIVISION
Boton 7 1 .875 -
Philadvlphia 7 5 .583, 2
Syracuse 5 7 .41 f 4
New York 6 9 .400 4V
x-Playing on coast.
LAST NIGHT's RESULTS
Detroit M, St. Louis 1?2
Philadelphia 145, Cincinnati 133
Syracuse 114, New York 102

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