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September 12, 1961 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12. 1291

WAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY 'fTTF~4flAV~ ~I~PTJ~MRI'1? 19 1ORI

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OPEN TO ALL:
Intramural Department Unique,

VI';

Sw- im mers

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Top

Star s

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By JOHN McREYNOLDS
For the person who isn't var-
sity caliber yet still desires to be
active in sports, the intra-mural
program at the University is made
to order.
Since it is realized that ath-
letics can be of great value to the
average person as well as the ath-
lete, Michigan has set up what is
regarded as one of the best intra-
mural sports programs in the
country, with Earl Riskey as its
present head.
The I-M department, now in its

50th year, offers a program of 34
different individual and team
sports, ranging from football and
basketball to paddleball and water
polo.
The program is centered in the
I-M Sports Building, on Hoover
just south of State, the first of
its type to be used strictly for
intra-mural activities.
The building, constructed in
1928, houses the basketball and
paddleball courts and the I-M
swimming pool. In addition, there
are gymnastics equipment, wres-

tling and boxing ringĀ§, and bar-
bells and pulleys available.'
The program is based upon
eight divisions of competition.
The largest division is the social
fraternity league, in which Sigma
Alpha Epsilon repeated as all-
year champion last year. All year
champs are selected on a basis of
points gained through final place-
ment in each sport. SAE won
championships in "A" and "B"
touch football, dual meets and
open meet swimming, wrestling,
"A" and "B" basketball, indoor
track and track relays.
The second largest division is
that of the residence halls in
which 21 houses compete The
halls tend to be dominated by
three South Quad houses, Gom-
berg, Huber, and Kelsey. Be-
tween the three of them, they
won 21 of the 25 championships
and finished one-two-three two
years in a row.
In the professional fraternity
division, twenty teams are head-
ed by traditional champion Nu
Sigma Nu, the medical fraternity.
The independent division is
formed from students not asso-
ciated with fraternities or resi-
dence halls. The group, which
competes in fifteen sports, is also
open for play to graduates and
inter-house teams.
International Center competi-
tion is between countries, many of
which have only a small enroll-
ment at the University. China is
the All-Year champ, as well as
the defending champion in six of
the nine sports, which include
soccer and cricket.
All-campus events consist of
tourneys in 28 sports, including
team competition in ice hockey,
lacrosse, regulation baseball, and
golf.
Groups of individuals interest-
ed in a certain sport can band to-
gether and obtain recognition
from the I-M department. Such
clubs often obtain the support of
a faculty adviser.
Last but not least is the facul-
ty competition, which pits the
various departments against each
other. Psychology barely nosed
out Physics in last year's all-year
standings.

By JOHN McREYNOLDS

At the end
dictions were
of Michigan's

work they do under 1961 Olympic
of last season, pre- coach Stager.

made that the era
great power was at

an end, at least for a few years.
Why? The main reason is
graduation - the graduation of
the nucleus of stars that won an
NCAA championship in May and
lost by less than four points (205
to 201 7/12) to Indiana in the Big
Ten Championships in April. Of
four Olympians, Dave Gillanders,
Bob Webster, -Alex Gaxiola and
Bill Darnton, only Darnton re-
turns.
Out of four all-Americans,
Captain Frank Legacki, Ron
Clark, Dick Nelson, and Gilland-
ers, only Nelson remains. Also lost
will be Harry Huffaker, John Mc-
Guire, Andy Morrow, Mike Natel-
son, Jack Pettinger, and Ken
Ware, all of whom scored points
in the 1961 Big Ten Champion-
ships.
Heavy Losses
These losses add up quickly-
the only department in which the
team does not lose its top men is
in distance freestyle. Coach Gus
Stager's squad will miss three of
five top sprinters (Legacki, Mc-
Guire, and Morrow), three of
four butterflyers (Gillanders, Pet-
tiger, and Natelson), and two of
four breaststrokers (Clark and
Ware).
The new sophomores stepping
into the lineup, as good as they
are, are just not good enough to
compare with the graduates step-
ping out. The sophs include five
butterflyers headed by J e f f
Moore from New Trier High
School in Illinois. Moore clocks
around 2:10 for the 200-yd. but-
terfly, but this time will have to
be lowered more than 10 seconds
before it comes in contention for
honors in the Big Ten.
Heading up the freestylers are
Frank Berry and Nelson Smith in
the sprints and Carlos Canepa, a
Peruvian import, in the distance
events. The breaststroke crew of
three is led by John Baker. The
top individual medleyists are
Moore and Jeff Longstreth, while
Paul Attar should help the div-
ing. How much the team improves
will depend upon the amount of

Veterans
Thus veterans will have to carry
the brunt of the attack. Leading
the team is captain-elect Bill
Darnton, a senior distance free-
styler and a 1960 Olympian. Also
in the distance freestyle lineup,
the deepest of the Wolverine po-
sitions are Warren Uhler, Win
Pendleton, John Dumont, and
Owen Kleinschmidt.
Darnton also occasionally swims
sprint freestyle, as do Brook
Plummer, Jim Kerr, Dave Heizer,
Kleinschmidt, and Dennis Floden.
Top backstroke and individual
medley performer Fred Wolf will
be back, along with backstrokers
Mike Reissing and Steve Thrash-
er. In butterfly Terry Slonaker
and Uhler return, while Thrasher
and Fred Wolf are the individual
medleyists remaining. The breast-
strokers are led by Nelson, the
NCAA 100-yd. breaststroke cham-
pion, record-holder, and All-
American team member.
In the more visible sport of
diving, Pete Cox and Ron Jaco,
eighth and sixth finishers respec-
tively in this spring's Big Ten
Championships, form the core.
Training Begins
The team will begin training in
October. Stager will continue to
use the method of repeating short
sprints, swimming, kicking, and
pulling, often employing weight
belts to strengthen and condition
his team.

Another thing often seen at
swimming meets is the shaven
swimmer. Nearly every tankman
uses this method to cut seconds
off his time. Arms, legs, chest,
and sometimes even heads are
shaved in order to take that extra
half second and the extra half
yard off.
The half-yards and half-sec-
onds will be of the utmost impor-
tance next year-archrival Indi-
ana, coached by Jim Counsilman,
will be swimming what may be
the strongest college team ever.
The Hoosiers lost two men by
graduation, breaststroker Frank
McKinney, who won both Big Ten
titles last year, and Frank Brun-
nell, a butterflyer - individual
medleyist who placed in the top
six in the Big Ten last year.
Hoosiers Powerful
The loss of these two men has
already been offset, however. Tom
Stock, a sophomore, beat McKin-
ney about half the time and was
second to him the other half.
Tom Stickles, another soph, not
only consistently outswims Chet
Jastremski and John Roethke, who
placed one-two in the Big Ten
200-yd. individual medley, but for
a time held the unofficial Ameri-
can record for that race at 2:03.
Considering that the Wolverines
were swamped by the Hoosiers'
dreadnaught last spring in dual
meet and championship compe-
tition, the outlook is dim toward
that side. especially since Jast-
remski recently was the first man

CAPACITY CROWD-That's wh
ana meet this year when the top-
Pool. Shown above is some of th
during the Wolverine-Hoosier m
to swim the 100-yd. breaststroke
in less than a minute.
The Hoosiers also have relay
teams that seem obsessed with
the idea of breaking records, and
have depth approaching that of
Michigan.
One might question whether is
is a team or an army.
Big Ten Strengthened
Of course, Indiana isn't the only
sun in the Big Ten Galaxy. Min-
nesota's Steve Jackman is sec-
onds ahead of any Wolverine in
both the 50 and the 100-yd. free-
styles, traditionally Michigan
forts. MSU's Carl Schaar is ten
seconds ahead of any of Stager's
present butterflyers in the 200-
yd. race; and his teammate Mike
Wood can give a good race to all
Maize and Blue swimmers in the
100-yd. free. And last but not least
is Ohio State with what looks like
the two top divers in the Big Ten
in Lou Vitucci and Juan Botella,
as well as a host of good swim-
mers.
The whole team sees that the
competition this year will prob-
ably be the toughest ever faced
by a Michigan team, confident in
knowing that the team that wins
is the team that makes its own
breaks, as the Wolverine squad did
last spring in the NCAA cham-
pionships in scoring an upset win
over Southern California.
Stager does lack the stars of

at will be expected for tne juAn-
rated Hoosiers invade the Varsity
he action Michigan fans enjoyed
eet here two years ago.
last year, but he still has the re-
nowned Michigan depth. "I never
predict a meet," he says. A team
with spirit and determination
often wins.

-I

THE

OLYMPIAN--That's Bill Darnton, captain-elect of this year's
swimming team, winning a freestyle event against Ohio State at
the Varsity Pool here. Darnton, a senior, will be among several
outstanding splashers returning to bolster Michigan's chances.

RON CLARK
. .. graduated

_ _ i

i

ICHI

u

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