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September 12, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

7

TKE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

T&e S CHWABEN INN
Take a Break!
Try our tasty "SCHWABEN BURGERS"
and tempting "POOR BOY SANDWICH"
For your pleasure we serve liquor, beer, wine,
and delicious cocktails
We serve 7 days a week
Sunday thru Thursday, 1 1:30 A.M. - Midnite
Friday and Saturday 'til 1 A.M.
STOP IN!,

DEARBORN CENTER:
Branch Offers Work-Study Program
(Continued from Page 1)

ealth Service Clinics Unk

#'

The student receives a salary
from his employer during his
working semesters. In this way
a student can be entirely self-
supporting, often making enough
to support himself during his.
academic semesters.
Stirton said that, "We should be
'looking towards this type of edu-
cation in the liberal arts program
also." Certain programs would es-
pecially lend themselves to this
type of program he indicated.
Math Work
Mathematics students could take
on work assignments in companies
involved in computor work. Art
students similary could alternate
semesters between the classroom
and commercial art companies.
The present enrollment in the
Dearborn Center is about 1,000.
Not all of these students, however,
are on credit prqgrams. About 200
students are in adult education
programs. At present 235 are in-
volved in the work-class alterna-
tion program. This September 400
are expected to be in this program.
Few students at the Dearborn
Center are from out-of-state. Work

with international students is be-
ing encouraged, though. Stirton
possibly foresees foreign business
administration students working
in a United States bank during
their working semesters. "When
they go back to their native coun-
try they will have a first hand
knowledge of American free en-
terprise and will have seen first
hand its practicability. This will
foster cooperation and under-
standing," he said.
Interest Elsewhere
There has been a lot of interest
in the Dearborn program from
elsewhere Stirton said. "Three or
four days a week someone comes
in for information." He was re-
cently in India for the State De-
partment. "The story of Dearborn
Center preceded me there, he said.
Stirton indicated that there is
a wide interest in student extra-
curricular activities. The student
government is a copy of the Uni-
versity's Student Government
Council. Besides social activities
there is an abundance of intra-
mural sports. There are about 9'
organized baseball teams he said,
besides tennis and badminton

JOHN F. KENNEDY
President of the United States
and
JOHN B. SWAINSON
Governor of the State of Michigan
invite you

courts. There are no intercollegiate
sports programs, however.
Buses regularly come "to varsity
sports events on the main campus
Stirton said. The Daily is also
read on the Dearborn campus.
Stirton lamented however, "We
don't get The Daily until the day
after it is published." He also
said that there is "unusually good
food in the cafeteria."
Stirton said that the library is
not complete to his satisfaction.
Stirton emphasized that while
the Center is located in the cen-
ter of Michigan's industrial center
there is still "plenty of elbcw
room. We have insulation without
isolation."
Flint Branch
The Flint college, a branch of
the University, was designed for
junior and senior academic work.
It offers courses in liberal arts,
business administration and edu-
cation.
The college is associated with
the Flint Junior College and for
a while did not have its own build-
ing but used the facilities of the
junior college.
In 1952 Flint educators ap-
proached the University and sug-
gested that the University es-
tablish facilities for junior and
senior level work to complete the
educations of those students who
attended the Flint Junior Col-
lege. The Regents approved the
branch in 1955 and in 1956 the
branch opened.
David M. French has served as
dean of the Flint branch since
its completion.
Money for the college was pro-
vided.by Flint philanthropist
Charles S. Mott.

By RUTH EVENHUIS
The University's health pro-
gram is unique in offering the
services of specialists beyond gen-
eral medical care, Dr. Morley
Beckett says.
Health Service has specialty
clinics in allergy, otology, oph-
thalmology, dermatology, dentist-
ry and orthopedic surgery. The
specialists are usually from the
University Hospital or medical
school.
In addition to the general medi-
cal clinic, Health Service has a
mental hygiene clinic staffed by
three psychiatrists and six psy-
chiatric social workers. Dr. Beck-
ett, Health Service director, noted
that a large part of this clinic's
work is in counseling students,
particularly those having prob-
lems of academic adjustment. This
service also deals with emotional
and neurological disorders.
Part-Time Specialists
Specialists on a part-time basis
are also available for consultation
in all of the specialties of medi-
cine, general surgery and gyne-
cology.
Other services offered are a 46-
bed infirmary, a clinical labora-
tory, diagnostic x-ray, *a phar-
macy, physiotherapy, emergency
dental care and special environ-
mental health services. -
Health Service is able to pro-
vide many services which are cov-
ered by the students' tuition fees
indirectly; others are offered at
reduced rates since Health Ser-
vice is not supported entirely by
funds alloted by the University
and must make up a certain
amount of its budget.
Free Services
Services provided free of charge
are attendance in the general

SPECIAL FACILITIES -Among
which make University Health
dispensaries, is its allergy clinic
prepared.

the many specialized facil
Service unique among ca
where allergens are tested

to build the New Frontier
through membership in
the University of Michigan
YOUNG DEMOCRATIC CLUB
(Membership applications will be accepted outside Waterman
Gym during registration. Dues: $2 per annum) H'S has the Largest Stock n Michigan
h

medical clinic during its regular
hours for illness or accident, at-
tendance in the mental hygiene
clinic and up to 15 days of room
and board in the infirmary for
acute illness. (Illnesses requiring
the services of University Hospi-
tal are also available at no cost,
provided that. immediate treat-
ment is a medical necessity, Dr.
Beckett explained.)
Dr. Beckett said that Health
Service is interested in "keeping
'the students in school." Thus,
any services which are immedi-
ately required are provided for.
However, Health Service does not
assume the expenses of treatment
which might be postponed until
the student can have it attended
to at his home.
Such treatment, Dr. Beckett
said, is, however, available at re-
duced rates through Health Ser-
vice facilities.
Services at lower rates are x-
rays other than those which are

included in the initial regi
program, laboratory tests,
ance at Health Service
regular clinic hours, hony
the services of the special
ics, hospital charges fo
emergency (elective) servi
immunizations.
Health Service also c
itself with such aspects
vironmental health as insl
supervision, and education
handlers, inspection of mil
er, food handling and prep
housing and general safety
Student Eligibility
Any student enrolled
University is eligible fo
services during the term fc
he is enrolled. The Heal
-vice requires a medical e:
tion form from the stude
physician prior to enter
University. Dr. Beckett sa
forms help alert Health
to conditions which may
attention.

1

Bna Brft HiRITeCo Fun tion
AT TKE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

kae/cqne ad £Arn
Our year opens with HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
(NOTE: University Orientation Events missed because of ROSH HASHANA may be made up at other times.)
ROSH HASHANA
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Michigan League
Sunday, Sept. 10 - All students -7:30 P.M.
Sermon: Dr. Herman Jacobs, Director
Monday, Sept. 11 - All students -9 A.M.
Tuesday, Sept. 12- All students --- 9 A.M.
YOM KIPPUR
Tuesday, Sept. 19- All students, 7:30 P.M. - Rackham Lecture Hall
Sermon: Dr. Norton H. Mezvinsky, History Department
Wednesday, Sept. 20- Conservative -=9 A.M. Rackham Lecture Hall
Sermon: Robert M. Berger, '63, Exec. Vice-Pres.
Wednesday, Sept. 20- Reform - 10 A.M. Rackham Amphitheatre
ORIENTATION FEATURES include
WELCOME SABBATH SERVICE - Friday, Sept. 15, 7:15 P.M.
MIXER - Sunday, Sept. 18, 7:30 P.M.
Admission - free to members; for others, $1.50
Services are open to all students, and their families, at no cost, for KOL
NIDRE Service, seats will be reserved .for affiliated Hillel members up to
7:15 P.M.
Affiliated members are issued Membership cards. The affiliation fee for the
academic year is $4.
For your convenience, an application form is attached below.
SPECIAL EVENTS will include
SUKKOT OPEN HOUSE, Sunday, Nov. 1, 3-5 P.M.
HILLELZAPOPPIN (Benefit Student UJA) Saturday evening, Nov. 11
ZWERDLING LECTURESHIP In Old Testament Studies. December 4-5
Dr. Nelson Glueck, Pres. HUC-JIR, world-renowned for archeological
discoveries in the NEGEV.
HILLEL'S 35th Anniversary - to be announced
A14NUAL FACULTY LATKE-HAMANTASH DEBATE, Tuesday, Mar. 20,
8 P.M.
THE YEAR-ROUND PROGRAM includes
Study groups, Hebrew classes, Lecture-Discussions, Sabbath Services, Israeli
Folk Dancing, Sunday Supper Club, Personal Counseling and other activities.
If sufficient students subscribe, Kosher dinners will be served.
ALL STUDENTS ARE INVITED to identify
themselves with HILLEL, to enjoy its facilities, program and personnel, to
join committees and to affiliate as members.

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ft:, 11ii. .LlLwti""."....:. 'ter%:11'}::{"XJ . fNrt"M"fWh'}: }'Nf.L ht Atlf::f.".9" .4Ytdt^ t 1iipF+Ll :Y411 {y1,1 li4vi' L }} 4. V.tt?::ti 0':ti".{ti^::VrtyY 1'^t1 "h . 4Y ti": rYrht^::f. "P.:fht1 "i.'r Yii:.+LMf 1""V:1A.....1 MY":::{'::Y.ti:::: ^'i:':. :.Y:
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It

Classic Styles
in Traditional Shirts

THE ENGLISH-

TAB

Certainly there is no more interest-
ing shirt than the tab collar

. (4L

tailored

by

Gant Shirtmakers.

Handsome cotton is artfully striped

for

a more meticulous look.

from

I

,[

6,50

"

r./' _ f
i

4

THE BUTTON-DOWN

I

I

The gentleman finds this favorite
shirt with an authentically flared
button-down collar to maintain
the fastidious look he requires.
Available in a host Of solid shades
and distinctive stripings.

a

I

DR. HERMAN JACOBS
Director

BARRY M. SHERMAN
President
ROBERT M. BERGER
Exec. Vice-Pres.8
HARRIET G. AVERBUCH
Secretary

LINDA S. LURIE
Admin. Vice-Pres.
DEBRA R. HORWITZ
Exec. Vice-Pres.
JOHN R. JACOBOWITZ
Treasurer

from

5.95

.

Yil l I M ---i-- M iI I -- I I Y tlA1 IgI 1-i Ow 1 gA . f 11 o r r i f ifl i lii i- tl

MAIL TO B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

Gq t'
49' x*A

U 1

k.:III.

I i

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