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October 26, 1961 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I .

SDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1961 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE!

Glinka's Passes Quiet Criticism

By BRIAN MacCLOWRY
If anyone has ever been on the
spot, it's Michigan quarterback.
Dave Glinka.
Harassed ' by student criticism
and increasingly subject to the
verbal bombardments of the "We
want Chandler club" every Satur-
day in the Stadium because of his
alleged mishandling of the Wol-
verine offense, Glinka has become
the most controversial football
player here since nobody knows
who.
What effect does it have?
Glinka, himself, is philosophical
about th hole thing.
Hears Criticism
"Sure, I hear the criticism," he
says, "but I don't think it affects
my play on the field any. I just
give my best when I'm in there
and that's all I can do."
The junior quarterback silenced
the crowd last week when he
played what he calls his finest
game since coming tQ Michigan.
Against Purdue, Glinka completed
nine of 11 passes for 179 yards.
Only a dropped pass by Bob Brown
in the first quarter and a near
miss on a long aerial to Bennie
McRae in the fourth period kept;
him from a perfect day.
"Yes, I'd have'to' say it was my
finest game," says Glinka. "I really
felt I was hitting my targets the
way I should.
Ice Rink Open
On S aturday
Break out those ice skates!
The skating rink will officially
open this,' Saturday for public
skating. Open skating hours will
be 10:30-12:30 Saturday, 3-5 Sun-
day, and 8-10 Monday, Wednesday
and Friday.
There will be a slight fee of
course.

"I really can't recall a game
where I played nearly as well as I
did Saturday. "No, I don't, think
there was a second best game," he
says modestly.
Glinka credits much of his pass-

ing effectiveness against Purdue
t~o the new.end-around offense in-
stalled by head coach Bump.
Elliott. When the Wolverines use
this formation, left end Scott
vfaentz moves to the other side
of the line, outside captain George

Mans. The wingback may also split
out five yards from his normal
position.
"I think it had the effect of
spreading out the Purdue defense,"
Glinka explained, "and it also
seemed to throw them into some
confusion. When the defense was
keyed on Maentz I'd throw to
McRae. If they were set up to stop
McRae I'd try to throw to one of
the ends."
Glinka has slimmed down from
his playing weight of 210 last year
to his present 195, and he feels it
has helped his play at quarter-
back.
Improved Speed
"I think taking off the weight
has improved my speed," he says.
Glinka, who found himself flat
on his back much of the time last
year when trying to pass, feels his
protection this year has improved
along with his passing.
The Michigan line this fall aver-
ages some 15 pounds heavier than
1960.
No Time To Think
"Actually, you don't have much
time to think back there in a
game," he laughs. "You just try to
concentrate on your receivers
without worrying about the rush-
ing linemen."
Michigan fans hope the big
quarterback will have more time
to concentrate this Saturday
against Minnesota than he did in
a 10-0 loss to the Gophers a year
ago in Ann Arbor.
If he does, the Little Brown Jug
could be on a plane headed East
Saturday night.

-Daily-Ed Langs
QUARTERBACK'S DILEMiA-A quarterback faces the pressure
of each play in a game and Michigan's Dave Glinka is no excep-
tion. Here Glinka guards the ball and prepares for an onslaught
of Army linemen. Expression on face of the Cadets' Peter Buckley
(61) indicates how linemen like to devour quarterbacks.

"Looking for a
Good Haircut?"
010 BARBERS
0 NO WAITING
Try
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

Maentz Tops Big Ten Punters

i

i~'

By The Associated Press
A total of no less than five
Michigan players rank among the
offensive leaders in Big Ten com-
petition thus far this season,
league statistics show.,
End Scott Maentz leads the,
league in punting with a 41.6 yard
average which is 1.5 yards better
than his nearest competitor. Quar-
terback Dave Glinka ranks second
in passing with a total 254 yaris
gained on 17 completions in 29
attempts.- Glinka is also fifth in
total offense with 218 yards gained
for a 5.7-yard average per play.
Six Receptions
Halfback Bennie McRae on the
basis of his one game's play
against Purdue ranks first in total
yards gained as a pass receiver
with 144 and fourth in total num-
ber of passes received with six. He
is followed in the latter depart-
ment by teammate George Mans
who has five receptions for a total
of 52 yards.
Among the rushing leaders, full-
back Bill Tunnicliff is listed with
a net total of 101 yards in 26 at-
tempts for a 3.9 average.
Ohio State's earth-quaking full-
back, 217-1b. Bob Ferguson, is the
Big Ten's leading ball carrier-

probably to the surprise of no con-
ference football fan.
Ferguson, who was an All-Amer-
ica choice as a junior last season,
has bulldozed to a two-game Big
Ten total of 202 yards in 38 car-
ries, a 5.3 average per haul.
Modest Start
Mter a modest start against
Illinois, carrying,14 times for 45
yards, Ferguson really got rolling
in last Saturday's 10-0 Buckeye
defeat of Northwestern. Battering
Bob slammed into the Wildcats 24
times for 157 yards."
Runnerup in. the rushing de-
partmept is. Northwestern's Bill
Swingle with a three-game total
of 168. However, the best ball-
toting averages belong to Iowa's
Joe Williams with 6.4 and Michi-
gan State's George Saimes with
6.3, each in two games.
Saimes, last week's rushing lead-
er, now is third with 151 yards on
24 hauls. The Spartan fullback,
however, was the star of Michigan
State's 17-7 defeat of Notre Dame
Saturday.
Ferguson is defending his 1960
Big Ten rushing title which he
captured with a 560-yard total in
114 carries for a 4.9 average.
The current Big Ten passing
and total offense leaders continue

to be Iowa's Matt Szykowny and
Wisconsin's Ron Miller.
Szykowny, who stepped brilliant-
ly into the gap when regular
Hawkeye quarterback Wilburn
Hollis was injured, has a fine two-
game passing percentage of .692
on 27 completions in 32 attempts
for 297 yards and 4 touchdowns.
Miller, who was supposed to be
this season's passing fireball, ranks
third in tossing behind Szykowny
and Glinka, but his better total of
337 yards in hitting 29 times on
57 passes, kept the Badger ahead
in total offense. Actually, runner-
up Szykowny has the better play
average, 6.6 compared with Mil-
ler's 4.2.

' ry=x '-)9TH
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