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October 24, 1961 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-24

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EIGHT

STON SYMPHONY:
Perry Cites Leadership,
P'ersonality of Conductor

THE MICHIGAN DAILY' TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1961
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By MARTHA MacNEAL

"There is no technique to lead-.
ship, it springs from personal-
y," said Thomas D. Perry, man-
ger of the Boston Symphony Or-
iestra speaking about Dr. Charles
unch, conductor, and his work
ith the orchestra.
"Some conductors are auto-
'atic, and maintain their control
y goading the musicians. But
unch's control is almost uncon-
:ious. He has a deep respect for
is fellows, and leads them by
aving confidence in what they
ill do, and by responding to them
i very subtle ways," Perry con-
nued.
Detailing the rehearsal process,
e noted that some conductors ex-
lain verbally exactly what should
e done. "But when a conductor
as been identified with one or-
hestra for a long time, he does
ot have to say what he wants in
o many words. A mutual under-
anding exists, such as that be-
veen personal friends."
Direct Rehearsal
A rehearsal of the Boston Sym-
hony Orchestra is direct, with
aany technical repetitions but
ew words. "The musicians just:
now when it didn't go so well.
,ehearsal is a mysterious process
hrough which the musicians re-
amiliarize themselves with the
iusic in each other's presence. Al-
nost nothing is said," Perry ex-
lained..
An orchestral performance often
iffers from rehearsal when finally
resented in the concert hall.
Some conductors repeat a rehear-
al exactly when the music is
erformed publicly. But for others,
ich as Munch, the rehearsal is a
efamiliarizing process, and the
oncert preesntation may change
reatly depending upon how peo-
le feel.
Recreating Process
In this latter way, the concert
s a process of creating rather
han repeating. Therefore, there
iay be many accidents, but there
s also a definite vitality which
oes not exist otherwise. "A good
erformance often' just happens,"
ferry emphasized. A performance
f the Boston Symphony Orches-
:a tends to vary from day to day
nd year to year.
"One of the main glories of
iusic is that it must be constantly
ecreated," Perry said. "Any per-
ormer puts part of himself into
. Any act of re-creation is, within
.mits, a subjective matter." Music
especially vulnerable to the per-
onal influence because pitch,
empo, and phrasing notation is
ery inexact. Thus, every per-
®rmance is bound to differ from
very other, he explained.
Stimulates Appreciation
Munch has had a great effect in
timulating public appreciation for
he music of Berlioz, which is now
onsidered more meaningful than
iad been thought previously. "As
with enthusiasm in many fields, a
reat rush of interest can aroused
or a certain person or work be-
ause some one person in the
ublic eye popularizes his own
nthusiasm. This is especially true

in the performing arts," Perry
noted.
Munch will continue to conduct
occasionally after his retirement
at the end of this season. Born in
Strasbourg, France, in 1891,
Munch founded the Orchestra
Symphonique of Paris in 1932. He
appeared with the Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra for the first time
in 1946. He has conducted 19 con-
certs in Ann Arbor.
4 ifoldi-Cites'
.False View
A bout Rome:
By CAROLYN WINTER
Prof. Andrew Alfoldi of Prince-
ton's Institute for Advanced
Studies spoke yesterday about the
fictitious accounts of early Rome
that have been handed down as
fact in the third Thomas Spenser
Jerome lecture.
There is no doubt that alleged
conquests of kings are for the most
part evident forgeries, or at least
that they must be regarded with
suspicion, he said.
"If, notwithstanding this funda-
mental clarification of the unre-
liability of sources, so many vain
attempts have been made quite
recently to save a good deal of the
historical reconstruction of that
remote epoch, this was due to an
erroneous approach to the literary
tradition," he added.
Noted Historians' Way
Prof. Alfoldi noted that the
habitual way of historians dealing
with the account of continuous
victories and no setbacks since
Romulus, is to select the seemingly.
more reasonable items for use and
to. discard anything giving a
"silly" impression.
This procedure would be accept-
ableable if source-material would
be something like the natural
remnants of the life of Early Lati-
um, to be picked up by the his-
torian intact as a fossil.
"Yet, the real essence of these,
tales is not a spontaneous hap-
hazard aglomeration, but is like a
skillfully conceived mosaic pave-
ment with a pattern purposely im-
itating ancient art, but containing
stones and distorting the original
only a few authentic little mosaic
device by a fictitious new one,"
Prof. Alfoldi pointed out.
Tale of Conquest
This tale of Roman conquest is
a preconceived scheme forged by a
far-sighted politician. The man
who did this could be nobody else
but the first historian of Rome,
Fabius Pictor, writing in Greek
and for the Greeks, trying to make
them believe that the Romans
were .highly civilized and had a
most glorious past, he added.
The subsequent annalists did
not make new research as they
tried only to shape this concept in
a more attractive way.

(Continued from Page 4)
Nov. 10-Turkish Students Associa-
tion, Discussion, "Understanding Kem-
alism," Multipurpose Room, UGLI, 7:30
p.m.
Mar. 9-Military Ball Central Commit-
tee, Military Ball, Union Ballroom, 8-12
p.m.
General Notices
Following are the foreign visitors who
will be on campus this week on the
dates indicated.
Program arrangements are being
made by the International Center:
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller.
Surachat Bhurniratana, Program Of-
ficer, U.S. Educational Foundation,
Bangkok, Thailand, Oct. 25-29.
P. J. Idenburg, Director & Secretary
General of the African Research Cen-
ter attached to Leiden Univ., Leiden,
Netherlands, Oct. 26-27.
Dr. Adriano Vilanova, Dean, School of
Dentistry, University of El. Salvador;
El Salvador, Oct. 27-Nov. 5.
Yuzaburo Kuramoto, Asst. Dean of
Students; Director, Clark Memorial
Student Union, Hokkaido University,
Shapporo, Japan, Oct. 28-Nov. 3.
Shozo Shinohara, Asst. Prof.; Mem-
ber of the Students' Affairs Committee,
Shapporo, Japan, Oct. 28-Nov. 3.
Morili Sagara, Prof. of Psychology,
Dept. of Letters,. University of Tokyo,
Tokyo, Japan, Oct. 30-Nov. 4.
Events Tuesday
Topology Seminar: Prof. K. Kuratow-
ski, University of Warsaw, will present
a special series of three lectures on
"Duality Theorem Between Cohomo-
topy Groups and Inter-Valued .Meas-
ures." The first lecture will be given
Tues., Oct. 24, at 2:00 p.m. in 2037
Angell Hall. Subsequent dates will be
announced.,
Refreshments in 3212 Angell Hall fol-
lowing the seminar.
Mathematics Colloquium: Prof. E. C.
Zeeman, Institute for Advanced Study,
will speak on "The Topology of the
Brain and visual Perception," Tues.,
Oct. 24, in 3209 Angell Hall at 4 p.m.,
Refreshments in 3212 Angell Hall at
3:30 p.m.
Events Wednesday
Linguistics Lecture: Prof. Kenneth L.
Pike, distinguished linguist, will speak
on "The Practical Phonetics of Rhythm
Units," Wed., Oct. 25, at 7:30 in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Cooley Law School Lecture: "On the
Record or Off the Record?" will be
discussedrby H. W. R. Wade, Prof. of
English Law, St. Johns College, Oxford,
England at 4:15 p.m. in 100 Hutchins
Hall, Wed., Oct. 25.
Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture:
Wed., Oct. 25 at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. B,
"Lavinium, the Leading Latin City in
the Seventh and Sixth Centuries B.C."
will be discussed by Andrew Alfoldi,
Prof. of Roman History, Institute for
Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jer-
sey.
Placement
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the 1961-1962
school year.
Berkley, Mich. - All positions open
Jan. 29, 1962-Early Elem.; HS Span.,
Mech. Drawing, Soc. Stud.
Rockford, Ill.-Jr. HS Engl./Soc. Stud.,
Indust. Arts, Math.; HS Engl.; Edu-

cable Ment. Ret.
Woodstock, Ill. (Commun. Consol.
Dist. No. 10)-Early Elem., Late Elem.
Torrance, Calif.-Kdg.; Early Elem.;
Speech Ther.; Educable Ment. Retard.
..North Tonowanda, N.Y.-HS French.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
NO 3-1511, Ext. 3547.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEW-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-H West
Engrg. Bldg.
OCT. 25-
American Air Filter Co., Inc., Louis-
ville, Ky.; Moline, Morrison, & Rock
Island, Ill.; St. Louis, Mo.; sales of-
fices throughout U.S.-BS-MS: EM &
ME. BS: ChE, CE, EE, IE. Des., R. &
D., Sales & Prod.
Aro, Inc., Arnold Air Force Station,
(near Tulahoma), Tenn.-All Degrees:
AE & Astro., EE & ME. MS-PhD: In-
stru. BS: E Math & E Physics. Feb. &
June graduates. Des., R.'& D., Testing
under simulated conditions in wind
tunnels.
Automatic Electric, Northlake, Ill. -
All Degrees: BE. MS: Communication
Set. BS: E Physics. IE & ME. Feb.
grads. Both Men & Women. Des., R. &
D., Sales & Prod.
Campbell Soup Co., Chicago, Ill. -
BS: ChE, BE, IE & ME. Feb. & June
grads.
OCT. 25-27-
General Electric Co., All locations &
activities. Trng. programs & specific
job placement-BS-MS: AE, ChE, EE,
EM. IE, Mat'ls., ME & Met. & Physics
& Math. MS: Nuclear, Instrumentation
& Chem. BS: E Math & E Physics &
Set. Feb. & June grads. Des., R. & D.,
Sales & Prod. & all requirements for
which a tech. bkgd. is needed-Trng.
program & specific job placemeit.
OCT. 25-
W. R. Grace & Co., Research Div.,
Clarskville, Md.-BS: ChE. Both Men
& Women. R. & D.
M. W. Kellogg Co., N.Y. City Hdqts.
& Res. Ctr. in Northern N.J.-All De-
grees: ChE, EM & ME. MS-Prof.: In-
stru. BS-MS: CE. MS: Construction.
BS: EE & E Math. Both Men & Women.
Des., R. & D., Process Engrg. & Con-
struction.
(a.m.)-
Sinclair Research, Inc., Tulsa, Okla.
-PhD: ChE, Phys. Chem. & Math. Both
Men & Women. Petroleum Prod. R1Es.
OCT. 25-26-
Standard Oil (N.J.):
Esso & Humble, Mfg. & Research at
Linden, N.J., Florham Jark, N.J., Baton
Rouge, La., Baytown, Texas, Tulsa, Okla.
-All Degrees: ChE. MS-PhD: Instru.
BS-MS: CE, BE, IE, ME & Met. MS:
Construction. Both Men & Women.
Des., R. & D.. Prod.
Jersey Production Res. Co., Tulsa,
Okla.-MS-'hD: ChA & Chem.-(See Dr.
G, 0. Binder). PhD: E Mech. & Phys-
les-(See Dr. F. K. Levin). R. & D.
OCT. 25-
U.S. Gov't.-Defense Operations Eval-
uation Group of M.I.T., Wash., D.C., &
Cambridge, Mass.-MS-PhD: AE & As-
tro., ChE, EE, EM, IE., Nay. Arch. &
Nuvlear. MS: Mgmt. Set. & Meteor.
Operations Research.
OCT. 26-
Allis-Chalmers Mfg, Co., Primarily
Training Program-All Degrees: BE, ME,
Met. & Nuclear. BS-MS: EM & IE. Des.,
R. & D., Sales & Prod.
Analytic Services, Inc., Alexandria,
Va.-(Wash. D.C. metropolitan area)-
MS-PhD: AE &' Astro., ChE, CE, BE,
EM, IE, Instru., ME. & Nuclear. MS:
Communication St. BS: E Mth & E
Physics.-Both Men & Women. R. & D.
Northern Illinois Gas Co., Aurora,
Crystal Lake, Dixon, Jollet, Ottawa,
Bloomington, Glenwood, Glenview &
Bellwood-BS: ChE, CE, EE, IE & ME.

Feb. grads. R. & D., Sales, Prod.-1 yr.'
orientation program followed by regu-z
lar assignments in Operating or Engrg.
Dept.r
OCT. 26-27-]
Standard Oil Co. of Calif., San Fran-1
cisco Bay Area, Los Angeles Basin, San
Joaquin valley-BS-MS: ChE, EE, ME.
PhD: EM. Both Men & Women. Des.,I
R. & D., Prod., Tech. Service, Oilfield
Engrg.
Union Carbide Corporation, All Divs.
-located in Ill., Ind., N.J., N.Y., Ohio &
W. Va.-PhD: AE & Astro, ChE, BE,
ME & Nuclear. Both Men & Women.
Des., R. & D.
OCT. 27-
Tennessee Valley Authority, Knox-
ville, Tenn. & Tenn. Valley area -
BS-MS: CE, EE, & ME. Feb. grads.
Des., Construction & operation of hy-
dro & steam-electric generating plants.
(p.m.)-
Gulf Research & Development Co.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.-BS-PhD: ChE. MS-
PhD: EE & ME. BS: Met. Both Men'&,
Women. R. & D.
Hooker Chemical Corp., Niagara Falls,
N.Y. & North Tonawanda, N.Y.-BS-
MS: ChE, ME & Chem. Both Men &
Women. Des., Dev. & Prod.
The Magnaxov Co., Fort Wayne, nd.
-BS-MS: EE. June grads. Des., R. & D.,
Prod.
Maumee Chemical Co., Toledo Re-
search Center & Cinci. & Toledo, Ohio
plants-All Degrees: ChE. Both Men &
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Assembly Assoc., Pre-workshop Meet-
ing of House Secrettaries, Oct. 24, 7:15
p.m., 3529 SAB.
Chess Club, Meeting, Oct. 25, 7:30
p.m., Union, Rm. 3M. Fun for beginners
& experts, everyone welcome.
* * *
Congreg. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild,
Luncheon Discussion: "Social Impli-
cations of Ultimate Concern," Oct. 24,
12 Noon, 802 Monroe.
** *
German Club, Coffee Hour, German
Conversation & Music, Oct. 25, 2-4 p.m.,
4072 PB.
* * *
Newman Club, Oct. 25, 8 p.m., New-
man Ctr. Speaker: Dr. H. W. Bird, M.D.;
"Mental Health Career Opportunities."
U. of M. Rifle Club, Meeting, Oct. 25,
7:30 p.m., ROTC Rifle Range.
* * *
U. of M. Folk Dancers, Meeting, In
struction & Dancing, Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m.,
1429 Hill.
* * *
Wesleyan Guild, Holy Communion
followed by breakfast, Oct. 25, 7 a.m.,
Meth. Church, Chapel.
Women's Senate, Meeting, SGC Can-
didates Present, Open Meeting, Oct. 24,
4:15 p.m., League, Henderson Rm.

Women. R. & D., Prod. Plant improve-
ment studies.
Texas Instruments, Inc., Central Res.
& Engrg. & Transistor Products Div.,
Dallas, Texas-All Degrees: ChE, EE,
ME & Met. BS: E Physics. Feb., June
grads. Des., R. & D., Prod.
Vapor Corp., Home office in Suburban
Chicago Area-BS-MS: EE. BS: ME. Feb.
& June grads. Des., R. & D., EE & ME
Trng. Prog.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call Ext. 3544 for inter-
view appointments with the following:
THURS., OCT. 26- "
U.S. Dept. of Defense-Location of
work: Office of Sec. of Defense. Feb.
& June grads with degrees in Public
or Bus. Ad., Poll. Set., Econ., & Law for
positions as Executive Trainees. Will
be assigned to various areas of De-
fense Mgmt.
Boy Scouts of America-Location of
work: throughout U.S.: Degree - any
field for positions as District Scout
Executives.
Moore Business Forms, Inc., Park
Ridge, Ill. (p.m.)-Location of work:
throughout U.S. Candidates for BA or
BS in any field who are interested in
career in Sales or Sales Mgmt.
Northern Illinois Gas Company, Aur-
ora, I1.-Feb. grads with degree in
Math., Econ., & English for positions
in Statistics, Data Processing, Market
Research, & General & Technical Writ-
ing.
FRI., OCT. 27-
U.S. Dept. of Defense (p.m.) - See
Wed.
Part-Time
Employment
Ahe following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
SHOP for
STU DENT
SUPPLIES
in the
MODERN MANNER
at
F~jLLETT.'S.
Widest Variety in town
e-open display
Sself-selection

can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 SAB, Monday thru
Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or full-time tem-
porary work, should contact Jack Lar-
die, NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200. daily.
MALE
1-Busboy, 12:00-2:00, five days per,
week.
1-Pianist, Thurs., Friday and Satur-
day evenings.
4-Salesmen, sell china & silverware,
commission basis.
3-Salesmen to sell college sportswear
for men.
-Several salesmen to sell magazines.
1-Engineering student, must be at

\least a junior, background In ra-
dio-isotope.
2-Ambulance drivers & attendants,
experienced in first aid, Senior card
in Red Cross. Night hours avail-
able, 7 nights per week.
FEMALE
2-Full-time waitresses, hours flexible.
1-Pianist, Thurs., Friday & Saturday
evenings.
3-Waitresses, 12-2:00 p.m., Monday
thru Friday.
1-Full-time saleslady for women's
apparel, experienced.
4.-Models, must be size 12, 5'5" or
taller.
1-Waitress; Tues., Thurs., Fri., even-
ings, 10 p.m.-12 midnight.
2-Fountain sales work, 4-10:30 p.m., S
days per week, four hours on Sat-
urday.
1-Waitress, Friday & Saturday eve-
nings, 12 noon-8:00 p.m. Sunday.

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