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September 12, 1961 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTTF.I.gn'AV_ -gV..PTV..'141RVTt. 19 1491

EIGHT THE MUCHIE~~~~AN DANNY 1TTT i~'~lAVQXT~~T~' ~1f

)"~A X , A)CA A1E iIVIIJ~.lt 4,ly1U

4

F

Students Lend Worldwide Flavor

THE

SNACK

THAT
SATISFIES...

Each year students from over
eighty foreign countries come to
the University-about 1500 strong
-to give a "typical midwestern
college town" an exposure to many
languages, spoken from under tur-
bans, or above saris, or through
moustasches.
Canada excluded, India, Japan
and Turkey send the largest num-
ber of students here, followed by
China, Iran and Venezuela. But
smaller numbers come from places
like Kuwait, Nepal, and Liberia.
Most international students
come to study engineering, but
almost all other courses of study
are also followed.
Meet Socially
Students from all over the world
may meet socially through the
World's Fair, International Week,
The International Ball, the Inter-
national Variety Show, the Inter-
national Students' Association and
the teas at the International Cen-
ter. The nationality clubs, formed
by ;students from lands having
more than 20 representatives here,
also hold their own dances, social
events and friendly gatherings.
The World's Fair is an annual
festival at which the visitor can
see national dances from many
"esoteric" areas, as well as treat
himself to unfamiliar foods and
customs from many different cul-
tures.
Culminating the carnival is that
International Ball, where almost
every nation contributes its people
and culture to the general con-
fusion.
International Week
Every fall, the Michigan Union
sponsors an international Week
which features a show of interna-
tional costumes and customs. Each
year, too, a group of students from
all over the world organize and
present a variety show which tours
the state and presents at least one
home performance. African danc-
ing, a Japanese trio, an Indonesian
Candle-Dance, Lebanese singing,
and . royal Thailand dance have
been presented in the past.
Wives of international students
sometimes have a difficult time
adjusting to American foods and
home-keeping habits, and so vari-
ous facilities-such as sewing ma-
chines, nursery equipment, and

STUDENT HOME-Offices of the International Student Center are in a portion of the Michigan
Union. Here the students may find out any information they need to know about, the University,
housing or visas and the Center may keep informed on the progress and difficulties of any foreign -
students.

HAMBU RGERS
SC

information on how to handle
American stoves-have been made
available to them.
Neighborhood tea and conversa-
tion groups are also organized,
more or less informally, to help
wives keep in touch with the
community.
Social Events
The International Students' As-
sociation organizes educational,
athletic and social events, and
strives to improve understanding
among students of different na-
tions.
Its new president, Anees Jung,
will be faced with a proposed new
constitution which would tie in
the nationality clubs and their
members more tightly with ISA
itself by having the clubs' mein-
bers automatically become mem-
bers of ISA.
ISA is already used to working
in cooperation with the national-
ity clubs, and sponsors lectures on

interpst, furnishing an opportunity
for American and international
students to work together.
Keeps in Touch
The University keeps in touch
with international students
through the International Center,
headed by Prof. James Davis.
The International Center of-
fers housing - at the Madelon
Pound House-for visiting foreign
leaders and faculty members, and
has, with its offices at the Cen-
ter itself, recreation and lounge
room available to all students.
Counselors
Three full time counselors ad-
vise students on problems arising
from immigration relationships,
financial matters, relations with
sponsors, academic status and
personal adjustment.
The Center also maintains re-
lations with the nationality clubs
and ISA, assisting them in organ-
izing their functions.
Private housing is located for
foreign students by offices in the
International Center, which keep
a list of landlords willing-or un-
willing-to rent their apartments
to students from other countries.
Programs Visits
The Center also programs the
visits of foreign teachers arid gov-
ernment officials who come to the
University.
The Center tries, when possi-
ble, to encourage relationships be-

and the off-campus community.
On Thanksgiving, many families
in or near Ann Arbor have sent
invitations (through the Interna-
tignal Center) to international
students to spend the holiday meal
with .them.
Local visits are planned for
weekends, and more extensive
traveling for vacation times is also
organized through the Center's of-
fices.
Dorms Aided
By Assembly
(Continued from Page 1)
Assembly sponsors many pro-
jects during the year, including
the I-Hop early in the fall. The
Assembly Inter-Quadrangle Coun-
cils joint sing is also held in the
fall, and each house usually works
with one of the men's houses. The
winning choir is awarded a cup
for each of the two houses par-
ticipating.
Spring Show is held during the
second semester. It is jointly spon-
sored by Assembly Association and
IQC, the purpose of bringing top-
notch entertainment to the cam-
pus. The Four Freshmen and the
Kingston Trio have appeared in
past years, as well as Louis Arm-
strong.

topics of cultural and political tween the international students

J

FRENCH FRIES
I0c

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1

«,t

SHAKES
C\w

we know w
and we
sportswear for that first
football game:
BOBBIE BROOKS
JANE IRWILL
DALTON
JAMES KENROB
MACSHORE
PETTI
a movie or a formal dance:
JONATHAN LOGAN
ELEANOR PORTOR
JULIE MILLER
R & K ORIGINALS
JAMAIN
EMMA DOMB
JOAN MILLER
JOHNNY HERBERT
LORRIE DEB
the shirt dress by:
BOBBIE BROOKS
SEBRIN
JOAN MILLER
and when it's cold -
coats by:
KAY McDOWELL
DONNYBROOK
PAUL R. NISSEN

hati
have

you

want

It...

I

Hi, Welcome to Ann Arbor and

DRIVE-IN SERVICE

to The University of Michigan.
Stop in and shop at

.4
I

I

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