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September 12, 1961 - Image 26

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

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VA~E SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, ~

STUDENTS, FACULTY, ALUMNI:
Board Decides Union Policy

Fraternities Pan Rush Week

CONVERSATION, ACTIVITY:
I T Lii 1.*

*

(Continued from Page1)
year during orientation week,
serves as an introductory social
event for freshmen to the Union.
Featuring a mock gambling casino,
a jazz band ,and movies, the pro-
gram alternates between the ball-
room and the grill, giving fresh-
men an opportunity to view the
Union. -
Another student service of the
Union is the sale of football tickets
in the lobby on Saturday mornings
before games. Also, at the same
desk any day or night of the week,
Union members may cash checks.

This desk also offers to any stu-
dent a convenient location to buy
bus tickets, blue books, candy,
cigarettes and magazines.
The Union also sponsors talks
by outstanding professors or by
outside experts in a field. Last
year, for example, the Israeli
Council came and talked about the
Eichmann case.
The Union also maintains a file
of available tutors.
These are just a few of the func-
tions which this student organiza-
tion performs.
The Union is a corporation
whose stock is totally owned by the

Regents. In charge of the organi-
zation is the Union Board of Di-
rectors which consists of students
elected at large, the student offi-
cers of the Union, alumni and fac-
ulty representatives and the Dean
of Men.
President of the Union this year
is Paul Carder, '62.
The student officers rise through
the ranks of the Union organiza-
tion, working on various projects
throughout their first three years.
In the spring, juniors are 'ap-
pointed to the three executive
positions by the Board of Direc-
tors.

Among the living opportunities
Uniesit is mthe fraternty, 44 of
which are represented on campus.
To acquaint men with the sys-
tem, a semi-annual rushing per-
iod is conducted at the first of
each semester, usually beginning
the fourth week and ending the
sixth. This two-week event is an
opportunity for the rushee to
learn about fraternity living at
the University and to possibly de-
cide for himself whether he would
like to be a member.
The Inter-Fraternity Council,
which governs the "Greek" chap-
ters, urges each man to go through
rush while at the University, so

he can learn about this way of
nty either semester move into the
chapter house the next fall.
Rush Registration
Those freshmen who wish to
look at the fraternity system their
first semester, and have not mail-
ed in a registration card during
the summer, may sign up for rush
at the Union.
Anyone who may want to rush
must sign up. Registration does
not oblige a man to rush, just as
going through rush does not obli-
gate a man to jpin a fraternity.
There will be rushing counselors
available at the Union beginning
Sept, 26 to answer any questions a

Language Cus rrovide
freshman may have on general
d1iidulhes fconstitutions,:ex Entertainment, Education
penses, and the like- _________________
All prospective rushees will at-. The activities of a foreign lan-
tend a mass meeting in the Union guage club are valuable to any one is welcome, although all of
Ballroom the third week of school. student of a foreign language. the speaking Is in French.
Here speakers will give needed in- They offer the opportunities to Regular evening meetings are
formation on rushing, and the men practice the language and to learn held every other week. At these
can meet representatives from all about the culture of the country. meetings, the program may con-'
chapters. "The special goal of the German sist of lectures, movies, discus-
The mingling of rushees and Club is to increase the under- sions, or plays.
fraternity members is in two standing of German culture .for One hour of every two evening
stages. The first, open rush, be- all undergraduate students of all meetings Is devoted to the stu-
gins Sunday and Includes the next departments of the University," dents. They present skits or recite
two nights as well. said Sol Gittleman, faculty adviser poetry. Annually a contest In the
Durig tesedays al hosesto the club. Through Its various reading of French poetry is held.
arpnringestiatios, anyose activities, the German Club hopes Students who have been to France
an wihou a invittin.gF to present a universal appeal so hold panel discussions in which
that not only students of German they explain their feelings, im-
advises each man to visit at least will participate in Its events. pressions and experiences which
12 houses. The Russian Club presents to they had in France.
Beginning Wednesday and con- the students opportunities to learn The Sociedad Hispanica, which
tinuing for the next week and a about the aspects of life in the has been active on the Michigan
half, rushees whom the chapters Soviet Union and to speak the campus for 50 years, offers activi-
would like to consider for mem- language. ties to students in the UnlversIty
bership are invited to return to Every monthly meeting offered who are interested in the Spanish
lunches, smokers and dinners. Aft- a different program. Slides were language and the culture of Spain
er a few of these visthe house shown by people who had visited and Latin America.

MOST POPU LA R SH OE ON CAMPUS
Wh~~~~it ( e)S ekr
M IC HIGA N g irls wea r K EDS and they
make RANDAL L'S their first stop
for tis foot comf ort!.

Also in
BRUSHED Nylon
in Black
or Loden Green
at 4.95

begis t sen ou "ids," or in-
vitations to men to joins its chap-
ter,
Robert Peterson, '62, IFC pres-
ident, advises men to take lots of

eithe
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time and think carefully before
deciding to join. Qnce a bid is ex-
tended, it can be accepted any
time before the end of the two-
week rushing period.
And here's what the well-
dressed rushee wears: suits dur-
in gopen rush, informal dress for
lunches, and sports jackets or
blazers for dinners and smokers.

Russia and lectures on the various Its purposes are to promote
facets of life in that country were interest in the Spanish language,
given. Former citizens of the to provide opportunities for gain-
Soviet Union, who now reside in ing linguistic fiuency in that
America, compared life here and tongue and to create a greater ap-
there. oreciation and understanding of
Put on Plays Cpanish and Latin American cul-
The students of the Russian de- ture and life.
partment put on plays, in which Holds Coffee Hours
they had a chance to practically TeScea ipnc od
use the knowledge of the language frequent coffee hours, which are
that they had gained in the class- attended by American students of
room. Frequently the students Spanish, Latin American students
engaged in snglng Russian folk ime~oft fuly

THIS BLUE KEDS LABEL STAMPS
THE SHOE OF CHAMPIONS

3 /2 to 11I
norrow or med
on the Campus - 306 S. State

GETTING TO KNOW YOU-Fraternity open houses and smokers
provide excellent opportunities for both fraternity and rushing
men to become acquainted with many new faces. Though the
conversations are sometimes strained, most men feel the experi-
ence ias been worthwhile.

songs.
Mostly Russian students sup-
port the programs, but others at-
tend when they have a special
Interest in the type of program
that is offered at a specific meet-
ing.
Announced in English
All of the programs are an-
nounced in English, although most
of the meetings are held in both
Russian and in English. Plays are
given entirely In Russian.'
The purpose of the French Club
of iFrenh, activties outsitden o
their classes and to acquaint them
with French language, literature,
and civilization. It offers them a
chance to practice the language
in a less formal atmosphere than
that of the classroom.
Since a language must be some-
thing that is used and not just
learned, the French Club plays an
Important part in the knowledge
a student gains about a foreign
language and culture, said Jean R.
Carduner, faculty adviser to the
club. .
Once a week a coffee hour is
held at which informal conversa-
tions in French are spoken. Any-

Every two weeks an evening
meeting is held at which time
slides, movies, lectures, group
singing or record dances are held.
Each year a Spanish Day is
scheduled for visiting high school
students of Spanish and their
teachers. This year 1,100 students
representing 30 Michigan cities at-
tended. The highlights of the day
were a variety show, movies, a
coffee hour for the teachers, a
carillon recital of Hispanic music,
an exhibit of arts and craftfrom
Spain and Latin America and a
tour of the language laboratory.
Staged Play
In other years a play has been
staged in Spanish at the Lydia
Mendplssohn Theatre instead of
the variety show.
A poetry recitation contest held
each fall is one of the traditional
activities of the Sociedad.
The organization maintains a
summer exchange scholarship with
the Universidad Nacional Auto-
noma de Mexico.
Because of their help in learn-
ing foreign language, these clubs
have been popularly supported by
University students.

THE RUSHEE
.'another cup of punch?'

U I!

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the greatest names

ID SPORTSUJG4R fMD DRE

SS6S

MR. MORT

BERNHARD ALTMANN

JUNIOR

GARLAND
The VILLAGER
PENDLETON
H ARB URT

SOPHISTICATES
ANNE FOGARTY
ANDREW ARKIN
JUENE LEIGUE
Shirt Dresses

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