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September 12, 1961 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY,

ALL-STUDENT PRODUCTION:
Musket Presents Broadway Musicals

1

Here's to
Collins

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} STATE an d LIBERTY
for the FOREMOST in COLLEGE FASHIONS
{ Round-the- lock
Nx. XII4
0 &
MAIN LlNGI fS SPO,
FLOOR lowe

Musket, the University's annual
all-campus show, will present a
new musical comedy as its fifth
offering this fall.
The group, which presented
"Kismet" last year, will hold its
Mass Meeting at 7:00 p.m. Sept.
24 in the Michigan Union ballroom
for all interested students.
At this time Musket will present
previews of numbers from their
new show in, addition to slides of
set models which have been pre-
pared for the production.
The Musket staff, headed by
general chairman Stephen Van-
dervoort, '62, has not yet decided
what the musical for this year will'
be. The committee is considering a
departure from recent endeavors
and may present an original musi-
cal composed by University stu-
dents, rather than the usual
Broadway hits.
Union Opera
Musket began five years ago,
growing out of the Michigan Un-
ion Opera.
The Union Opera had its begin-
nings around the turn of the cen-
tury and was known throughout
the country for its road tours. The
Opera presented original all-male
'musical shows which were gener-
ally a parody on campus life.
Its productions were lavish, cost-,
ling as much as $20,000 in the early
1920's, but were of excellent qual-'
,ity as well. Twice the Union Opera
played' at the Metropolitan Opera
bHouse in New York and in 1925
the show was received by Presi-
:dent Calvin Coolidge at the White
'House.,

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BAGHDAD BOW--The Arabian nights setting for the production
allowed artistic imagination and genius to run wild. The result
was some of the most beautiful scenery ever used for a Musket
presentation.

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The depression, however,
brought to an end the grand scale
shows of the 'twenties and when
World War II came, all produc-
tions ceased until 1949. In that
year the Opera was revived and
ran until 1955 when it closed down
for good.
Varied Reasons
The reasons were varied. The
Opera was too much of a vaude-
ville show, but primarily it was too
expensive to operate, Musket was
born immediately after the
Opera's demise. The production
got its title from the decision to
let coeds enter into the activity
(Michigan Union Show, Ko-Eds
Too). It decided to present Broad-
way musicals.
The first two productions -
"Brigadoon" and "Kiss Me Kate"
-were presented at a local movie
theatre. But' they were plagued
with the same bugaboo that had
hurt the Union Opera--expense.
Professional Aid
This was probably due, no doubt,
to the simple fact that students
participated only in acting in the
show. Sets, for example, were pro-
fessionally designed and con-
structed and the costumes were
rented.
MUSKET was in some danger
until renovations were adopted.
The decision was made to move
the show to the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre and make the pro-
duction completely student run
and organized: sets, costumes,
music, staging, acting, everything.
Both shows prduced at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre-"Ok-.
lahoma!" and "Carousel" - have
done well. "Carousel," for example,
was sold out completely for four
of its five performances.
"Kismet" also was well-received
by University and Ann Arbor the-
atre goers, selling out three nights.
Musket is composed of students
from all schools and departments
of the University and offers nu-
merous activities, ranging from
set work to programs, to those who
join.
Its committees include: publici-
ty, .programs, tickets, ushers and
productions. Productions is sub-
divided into sets, costumes, make-
up and props.
"ntetested students may gn°up
for these commxrittees folluwing the
mass - meeting. Try-outs for the
singing- and dancing choruses,
principal parts and orchestra will
also be held at this time.
Staff Needed
Over 200 persois are needed to
put on the performance, with jobs
ranging from acting and dancing
to working on orchestration, sets,
makeup, props, promotions and
programs. Musket crews have gen- ,t,:
erally stressed the importanace of
loyalty to the entire production
no matter what their individual
jobs may be.
One of the concerns,of iusket
committees in the past has been
the need for a year-round opera-
tion so that interested woers
who finish with one musical in
December could continue working
and not have to wait g'ntil the
spring for the choosing of the next
presentation.
Another possible innovation
(actually a revival of an old pera
tradition) is putting the fall pro-a
duction on the road. This. would
entail the added responsibility of
gettin gtransportation for scenery,
crew and actors for a one-night
stand.

and here's to YOU from
The Favorite Fashion for the
Well-Dressed Coed
Sold in Ann Arbor
ONLY at

in

Sizes
to 15

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Collin

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SUBSCRIBE TO The Michigan Daily

G

Call NO 2-3241

HAREM BEAUTIES-The 1961 Musket production featured bevies of beautiful coeds in harem dress,
adding immeasurably to the attractiveness of the musical "Kismet". Object of their attentions is,
Haij, the cunning, principal character.

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