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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1961 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6

EIGHT,

THNE MICIGAN TJATIV

as au f- , vaa a . arh na-l SU

NDAY, OCTOBER 8,

Vo Scedule
dew Classes'
So r F a c u l t y'
The business administration
iool will offer an intensive pro-
am on the application of mathe-
atics to business for senior
embers of business administra-
n faculties 'this summaer, Prof.
illiam J. Schlatter, director of
e program announced.
The program,,, financed by the
rd Foundation, f designed to.
et the increasing need for a bet-
understanding of math in rela-
n to analysis and solution of
siness problems.
Thirty instructors, probably 15
them from the University, will
rticipate. Each participant will
granted an $800 stipend and
placement allowances for his,
-ily.
M'embers are nominated and
oen from the member schools,
the American Association of
llegiate Schools of Business.
lub Sponsors
id Program
the Newman Club is sponsor-
programs for Catholic for-
a students at the University,1
b president Thomas Quigley,
ad, has announced.
)ne new feature is a "brother-
er" program in which an Amer-
n student escorts ,his foreign
other" or "sister" to social

ECONOMIC DEFECTS:
'U' Professors Examine
Cost of Auto Accidents

By PHILIP SUTIN
The economic consequences of
automobile accidents are being
studied by Prof. Alfred Conard of
the Law School and Prof. James
Morgan of the Survey Research
Center.
Financed by a grant of $75,000
from the William W. Cook Endow-
ment and $34,500 from the Walter
E. Meyer Institute of Legal Re-
search in New Haven, Conn., the
study will. attempt to determine
4the major factors in auto cases
and the accident's economic ef-
fects.
"We are not concerned only
with what the victim gets in
court, but what ,compensation he
gets from other sources and what
happens to him," Prof. Conard
said.
Various Sources
He explained that victims may
get as much nioney from Blue
Cross, workmen's compensation
and social security as from court
decisions.
"The study would like to know
what victims get, compared with
what they lose. For example, do
they get compensation for wages,
they lose? Also,' nobody knows
what they get for their suffering,"
he said.,
This and other information is
being gathered by a series of
questionnaires' and interviews of.
victims, defendents 4nd . their
lawyers.
Random Studya
To begin the study, a randomi
selection of state police records
of personal injury accident cases
was made. Questionnaires werei
mailed to 2800 victims asking in-
formation about the accident, thei
court litigation and other factors.
From these cases approximately
400 serious injury victims with
at least a $500 medical bill, per-
manent disability, or hopsital stay
of .more than three weeks, were,
interviewed. f
Approximately 275 of these cases
were selected for more intensive

PROF. JAMES MORGAN
... accident effects

study. The Survey Research Cen-
ter sent questionnaires and in-
terviewed the victims, the de-
fendents and their lawyers.
How Much
These surveys attempted to find
out how much the victim received,
what he says he paid his lawyer,
and the margin of error between
the various stories.
"From the 4awyers, the study
asked what they argue about in
these cases. It wanted to know,
whether they debate the accident's
cause, the victim's future or how
much suffering," Prof. Conard ex-
plained.
The survey phase of the study
is nearly complete. Members of
the group studying these economic
effects are beginning to analyze
their data.
Prof. Conrad expects the study,
which began in 1959, to be com-
pleted by Sept., 1962.
Panhel To Study
Sorority Image
The sorority system, ds viewed
by others, will be the main topic
of the Panhellenic Association's
annual workshop to be held Tues-
day in the Michigan League, Car-
lotta Maize, '62, workshop chair-
man, announced.
There will be four meetings
held simultaneously. They will be:
activities, relations between the
executive and judicial councils in
the individual houses, the study of

Cite Intuition
In Forming
Clear Ideas
By PATRICIA O'CONNOR
Students weary of reasoning and
retrospection may find new hope
in experiments conducted by Prof.
Rognar Rommetveit of the psy-
chology department of the Univer-
sity of Oslo.
In a recent lecture "Intuition in
Concept Formation," Prof. Rom-
metveit offered experimental evi-
dence supporting popular opinion
that thinking may even tend to
befuddle a question that would
otherwise be intuitively clear.
Tests indicated that subjects
who felt no pressure to learn and
who had no previous knowledge
of the subject presented to them
would acquire an understanding of
it without being distracted.
However, subjects with an in-
centive to learn may find it diffi-
cult to concentrate because they
will tend to be sidetracked by ir-
relevent details.
Psychologists have long studied
and argued about the significance
of the intuitive processes and their
counterparts, reasoning and re-
flection.
To test the role of intuition in
learning, a psychology laboratory
in Norway was turned into a
gambling house where 32 boys
about 13 years old learned to play
the wheel of fortune. The boys
selected had normal vision and
were chosen from, the upper half
of their classes.
The boys were divided into four
groups. The first group was given
no incentive to learn and no pre-
vious knowledge of the game. Psy-
chologists explained to them that
they were merely interested in
whether or not boys their age en-
joyed playing with a wheel of
fortune.
The psychologist told the second
group that he was interested in the
boys' learning, and thus giving the
subjects an incentiveto learn. This
group, too, had no previous knowl-
edge. The third group, instructed
in the variations of the game, had
knowledge but were given no par-
ticular incentive. The fourth group
of eight were given both an incen-
tiye'and knowledge of the game.
The results of this experiment
showed that subjects in group one
with no incentive to learn and no
previous knowledge showed as
much skill and understanding of
the game as the other three
groups.
Another indication of the dis-
turbing influence of reasoning oc-
curs when a subject who has been
doing well is stopped to ask how
he is making his judgments. Once
made to think of the rationality of
his guesses, he does worse.

ON THE AIR--Timothy Belian, '63E, caught in the act of broadcasting his show, "Dial 650." Itpis present from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.,
Mon.-Fri. Besides musical shows, WCBN offers objective news reports every hour, every day. Special interpretations of the world
news events -and how they relate to the campus population are given weekly. The professional atmosphere of the station affords
valuable experience for the staff.
W CBN 5Presents, News, MusicI

,

The goal of WCBN, the cam-
pus broadcasting station, is to pro-
vide high quality programming for
all segments of the University
community.
"Our whole broadcasting ar-
rangement is based on the stu-
dent's day. We try to give him
what he would like to hear," Gen-
eral Manager Rik Karlsson, '62,
said.
With three studios located in
South, East and West Quad-
rangles, WCBN brings tothemcam-
pus a, variety of programs, in-
cluding newscasts throughout the
day, sports reports, musical broad-
casts, and special shows. One serv-
ice of the' station is to offer
free air time to student organiza-
tions to present shows.
Karlsson sees WCBN as "a me-
dium for getting across ideas to
the student. We want to both in-
form'and entertain.

'

HI Fl SPECIALS
DIAMOND NEEDLES from $2.95
LOWEST TAPE PRICES
SONY, SHERWOOD, HARMON KARDON
FISHER, DYNA, EICOr
Your Best Deal Is Here
HI-Fl STUDIO
Open evenings 1319 South Univ.
NO 8-7942 'near Washtenaw and S.U.

I

the incorporation of transfers and
new initiates into the houses, and
a miscellaneous discussion to cov-
er everything else.

DAI LY PHOTO
FEATURE.
Story by
BARBARA PASH
Photographs by
FRED SHIPPEY

41

A PLEASANT VOICE -- General Manager Rik Karlson, '62,
temporarily leaves his administrative duties to broadcast "The
Late Show" from 11:30 p.m. to one a.m. every Sat.- night. All
one needs is a pleasant voice and a relaxed manner to charm
tie listener.

ORdq 3 4.agb /e~tf

TO ENROLL FOR

t

t

STUDENT

HEALTH

INSURANCE

PLATTER PATTER-A disk jockey plays you favorite songs. If you want to hear a certain melody,
just call in and' (if they have it) .they will play it for you. Often, the musical score, of a Broadway
show is broadcast in its entirety. Although most announcers are men, women students are invited
to try out for this stimulating job.

AT THE SAME COST
AS LAST YEAR
BUT WITH ADDED COVERAGE
In Force 24 Hours a Day 365 Days a Year
Anywhere in the World

4r PvA#"; ;t i ;i ,.rrmrdrsr, irrs n frff

I

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