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October 08, 1961 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


4.

-Daily-Fred Shippey -Daily-Fred Shippey
TWO TALLIES FOR THE WOLVERINES-Dave Raimey and Bennie McRae, 'Michigan's talented halfback duo, were two important factors in Saturday's 38-8 victory
over Army. At the left, Raimey breaks loose from eight yards out to score the Wolverines' first six-pointer in the first quarter. McRae, right, finds running room
as he cuts back into the Army secondary on his way to a 43-yard 'touchdown gallop. That's Michigan's Scott Maentz (96) giving McRae blocking.assistance. Army's
Paul Zmuida (85) and till Whitehead (50) try to close in on Raimey.
Wolverine Ground Attack Batters Cadets

(Continued from Page 1)
Bickle kicked the first of five
xtra points, in a busy day which
lso saw him boot a field goal
nd kickoff seven times. The im-
ressive sophomore made his field
oal from the Army 11, which
oosted the score to 10-0 after
-uy Curtis had recovered Army's
econd fumble, again onsthe 23-
'ard line.
The grab by Curtis came on Ar-
ay's first play after the kickoff.
rack Stroebel, Glinka, McRae and,
runnicliff combined to carry the
all down to the four where Ar-
ny stiffened and forced the
hree-pointer.
Shortly afterward, McRae elec-
rified the crowd of 65,012 by cut-
ing over left guard and racing
7 yards for a score with 3:31
one in the second quarter. It was
% moment that Michigan fans, as
well as McRae had been waiting
or. When asked how he felt about

shunninlg his "almost, but not
quite" tag on his longest college
run ever, he said, "I really wanted
that one bad and once I shook
off that last tackler's hand, all
I saw was daylight."
McRae Leads Runners
McRae was the game's leading
ground gainer, racking up 95
yards in only nine carries as he
finally approached the stardom
predicted of him.
His run completed a four play,
65-yard drive following a quick
kick by Army's Dick Peterson.
Late in the half, however, Eck-
ert took to the air and started
riddling Michigan's pass defense.
He completed 7 of 12 in that quar-
ter alone, as an aerial to halfback
Tom Culver carried the Army into
Michigan territory for the first
time with 2:30 left in the half.
Time and the' Wolverine first
string defense stopped the desper-

ate Cadets, leaving Bump Elliott's
squad 17 points to the good.
Both coaches agreed that the
first half was the key to the
game, though Elliott admitted
that he was concerned in the
third period. "Things looked rough
for us," he said, "but breaks and
long gainers got us going again."
It was also breaks and long gain-
ers thatsArmy Coach Dale Hall
referred to in lamenting his team's
poor first half showing, but he
called them "our mistakes.", "The
fumbles and poor tackling allow-
ed them to get ahead of us," he
said, "and it was too far to come
back."
Black Knig)
MICHIGAN ARMY
First Downs 15 12
Rushing 11 2
Passing 2 10
Penalty 2 0
Total Number of Rushes 48 32
Net Yards-Rushing 239 15,
Passing 50 164
Forward Passes Att. 1 33
Completed. 4 22
Intercepted by. 2 0
Yds. interceptions ret. 62 0
Total Plays (Rushes and
Passes b59 65
Punts, Number 7 6
Average distance 32 45
Kickoffs, returned by 2 7
Yards Kicks Returned 79 168
Punts 33 32
Kickoffs , 46 136
Fumbles, Number 0 3
Ball Lost by 0 )
Penalties, Number 5 4
Yards penalized ' 45 50
RUSHING
MICHIGAN

Despite Hall's words, his squad
was still very much in the game
after the half as Elliott remark-I
ed. Filling the air with passes,3
Eckert led the Cadets to touch-
down territory in 15 plays after
Michigan stalled on the visitor's1
38 and Scott Maentz punted intos
the end zone.
Eckert completed seven passes inl
the drive- for 58 of the 80 yards,
with the las flip going eight yards
to Peterson all alone in the end
zone. Sub quarterback Joe Black-
grove came in and flipped a bas-
ketball type shovel pass to end Bob
Fuellhart for Army's final two
points.

ht for Army
Tunnicliff 8
McRae 9
Raimey 3
Strobel 5
Tureaud 1
Ward 1
McLenna 4
Hood 4
Chapman 3
Raeder 1
Hornbeck 1
Dougall 2
Spacht 1
Totals 48

30
95
17
11
8
6
11
8
8
6
2
6'

0 30
0 95
0 17
0 11
0 8
0 6
0 11
0 8
17
0,6.
0 2
0 6

Michigan came roaring back
after the aerial-show ended, as
Ed Hood returned the kickoff 42
yards into Army territory, almost
going all the way. One minute and
45 seconds later, Tunnicliff bulled
three yards for the third touch-
down, culminating a five play, 48
yard drive. A 15 yard personal foul
helped the Wolverines in the
march.
Army Moves
This didn't stop Eckert as the
moved Army to the Michigan 48,
completing three passes along the
way before disaster struck in the
person of- Stroebel. The defensive
halfback was man-on-the-spot as
he intercepted Eckert's pass and
rambled 42 yards to the Army 16.
Tunnicliff smashed twice to the
seven, then sophomore halfback
Bruce McLenna . carried three
tacklers into the end zone at the
third quarter gun.
A Stroebel Steal
Stroebel had completely dimin-
ished any remaining Army hopes
with his timely play, as he took
'advantage of the one on one sit-'
uation. Eckert was surprised be-
cause no defender had been close
to his halfback on the pattern all
day long. Even Elliott admitted
that Stroebel "was only creeping
up on the play."
All in all, the win established
Michigan as a solid football team
which will be firmly challenged by
arch rival Michigan State before
a packed house next Saturday.

-Daily-Ed Langs
A TOE IN THE OFFENSE-Sophomore end and placekicker Doug Bickle is shown above kicking an
11-yard field goal in the first period of yesterday's game with Army. It was Bickle's second field
goal of the season. The rangy end also had a perfect five-for-five day kicking extra points. In two
games Bickle has accounted for thirteen points for the Wolverines.
SMELL ROSES?
'M' Rose Bowl rea- Faces

Spartans in Big Ten Opener

4

t

Blakistonl
McGraw-Dill
Books
for
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In this/second edition the chapter on Chemistry of the Proteins has
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Stop in at your bookstore to examine any of the above titles.

Player
Eckert
Culver
King
Rushatz
Cunningham
Peterson
Pappas
BIackgrove
Stanat
Totals

ARMY
Tries
11
2
4
4
2
3
1
3
2
42

240 1 239
Gains Loss Net
10 41 -31
4 10 4
23 0 23
11 1 10
4 10 -6
68 53 15

Player
Glinka

Tries Gains Loss Net
5 29 0 29

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4a

By DAVE ANDREWVS
.Associate Sports Editor
The smell of roses floated faintly
over Michigan Stadium yesterday
as the Wolverines convincingly
dumped Army 38-8.
Last week it was UCLA, 29-6,
and many non-believers were con-
verted. The victory yesterday"
turned a few more. The most
skeptical looked ahead to next
week's clash between the Wolver-
ines and Michigan State. "We'll
see next week Just how good Mich-
igan is,", they said.
To Michigan Coach Bump Elliott
this simply means that his team
is now 2-0 for the season and for
the first time since 1955 a Michi-
gan team has won its first two
games. "There's still a lot of foot-
ball ahead for us," he said, "and
we'll still play them one at a
time.
Didn't Look Ahead
"No, we weren't looking ahead
to Michigan State," he continued.
"How could we? The game was
still in doubt until the middle of
the third quarter. Until then,
things looked a little rough. We
were kind of standing still for a
while."
And concerned he might be. The
Cadets had found the Michigan
air defense full of holes. In all the'
Black Knights connected on 22 of
33 passes for 164 yards and a
touchdown, and had narrowed the
gap to 17-8.
"We were conceding the short
pass," Elliott said. "They can
throw long and we wanted them to
have to work for their scores."
Big Ten Standings
WI L T Pet.
Michigan State 1 0 0 1.000
Northwestern 1 0 0 1.000.
Wisconsin 1 1 0 .500
Michigan 0 0 0 .000
Iowa 0 0 0 .000
Ohio State 0 0 0 .000
Purdue 0 0 0 .000
Minnesota 0 0 0 .000
Indiana 0 1 0 .000
Illinois 0 1 0 .000

But, for what it's worth, for the
second straight week the Wolver-
ines have dumped "the best." Last
week UCLA came to town wearing
the tag the "best in the West."
Yesterday it was Army's turn as
the "best in the east." And be-
lieve it or not, two national maga-
zines in pre-season forecasts had
predicted a UCLA-Army match in
the Rose Bowl game come New
Year's Day.
Fumbles in Michigan Stadium
seem to have become a. habit for
Army football teams. The last time
the Cadets were here, in 1956, they
dropped the ball eight times, lost
it on six occasions, and wound up
on the short end of a 48-14 score.
Though the Army fumbled only
three times yesterday, all of them
came in the.first quarter and two
of them led directly to Michigan
scores. Army Coach Dale Hall
blamed the bobbles on "sophomor-
itis. We've got seven of them on
the first two teams," he said.
* * *
The 38 points the Wolverines
racked up was the highest Michi-
gan total since Bennie Ooster-
baan's last good team piled up 49
against Indiana in 1956.
*e ' *
Army's mascot yesterday was a
fake. The real "Hannibal" was
left behind at West Point. The
beast who balked at entering the
Stadium shortly before kickoff
time yesterday was really "Abner,"
a borrowed burro from a farm in
"Keep A-Head
of your Hair"
We specialize in
* PERSONALITY CUTS
* CREW-CUTS
* FLAT TOPS
o PRINCETONS
try-
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near Michigan Theatre

FALL
SPECIAL

Dexter. Wonder if he passed secur-
ity clearance?
* * *
For the second consecutive week-_
end Michigan captain George
Mans has lost the flip of coin. He
can't possibly be worse, however,
than last year's captain, Jerry
Smith, who lost seven in a row be-
fore finally winning the Indiana
toss. Guess the Hoosiers weren't
much good at anything.
The television cameras that dot-
ted the camera deck of .the Sta-
dium press box belonged to Sports
Service. A closed circuit telecast
was being beamed back to the rest
of the cadets at West Point.
* * *
Last week senior halfback Ben-
nie McRae scored his first TD in
two years. Yesterday senior end
Bob Brown, better known for his
antics on the basketball court,
scored his first Michigan touch-
down.
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