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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

LLEGE COSTS:
Schools Debate Tuition Rates

Gerstacker Plan Provides
Support, Job for Students
By RONALD WIL TON
Sreached. The student does
"The advantages of the Ger- have to take out the policy b
stacker plan to aid needy students is "strongly urged" to do so,;

(EDITOR'S NOTE--There's some
very plain, hard talk in academic
circles about how to tiedown the
climbing cost of college education.
Private and public educators split,
sometimes violently, about scholar-
ships, installment plan education
and just who should foot the bill-
dad' or the state legislature. Here's
a review of those costs that have'
nowhere to go but up.)
By G. K. HODENFIELI
Associated Press Education Writer
WASHINGTON - The cost of
iigher education is zooming out
f sight-as any parent of a col-
ege student will tell you.
But this: year's freshman may
omeday look back at 1961-62 as
the good old days" when a college;
ducation was relatively inexpen-I
ive..
Every student cost is on an
scalator going up-tuition, lab
ees, room and board, activity
ickets, books ,and' supplies, even'
ating and recreation.
Index Rises .
From -1952 .to 1960, the LaborI
)epartment's cost-of-living index
ose by 11.5 per cent. During the
ame. period, resident tuition. and
ees at major public universities
acreased more than 71 per cent,
end room and board costs rose 27
er cent. Comparable figures for
rivate colleges and- universities
robabIy would show'even steeper
acreases.
Against this background, the
Visconsin State Coordinating

Committee on Higher, Education
has said tuition at the state col-
leges . and the state universityI
should be gradually reduced until
it disappears.
To officials of public colleges
and universities, the idea seems
eminently right and proper. To
officials of private . colleges and
universities, the very thought is
too horrible to contemplate.-
Fever Heat
The debate between public and
private institutions on tuition rates
reaches fever heat at times.
The private institutions say tui-
tion must be raised to meet ever-
increasing costs. The public insti-
tutions say that raising tuition
would defeat their moral and legal
obligation to. provide higher edu-
cation to all who want it and can
benefit by it.
If public institutions stick to
,the low tuition principle, while pri-
vate colleges and universities con-
tinue to increase their charges,
some private school would soon
price themselves out of the mar-t
ket.
No Question
There is no question but that
both types of colleges need more
money.
Enrollments are leaping upward
every year. This -means more dor-
mitories, classrooms, libraries and
faculty. Yet tuition probably never

Paintings and Drawings
October 2-28
FORSYTHE GALLERY 0 201 Nickels Arcade 0 Ann Arbor

10

TU ES.
DEC. 12
8:30 P.M.,

AEM,

-i

T YRONEGUTHRiE'
PRODUCTION DIRECT FROM
THE STRATFORD FESTIVAL OF CANADA
"A SMASH SHOWI-A HOWLING SUCCESS!"
-roronto Telegram
GILBERT and SULLIVAN'S
-.
: 'RATS Of: NZNE
COM PANY O F 50 WITH ORCHESTRA,
Orch. $3.00-$3.50; BIa. $2.00-$2.50-$3.00

will cover the full cost of a college
education.
A student at a state-supported
school pays about one-fifth of the
actual cost of his instruction. At a
private institution he pays slightly
less than half. :
Depend Primarily
State - supported colleges and
universities depend primarily on
appropriations from state legisla-
tures to make up the difference.
Private institutions depend pri-
marily on gifts and grants from
individuals, foundations and cor-
porations. Both also try to get as
much as they can from alumni.
Public institutions have man-
aged to hold the line for low tui-
tion, despite tremendous pressures.
At the University of California, '
for instance, there is still no tui-
tion charge for state residents,
although required fees total about
$150. At most other state universi-
ties the combined tuitio. and fees
fall somewhere between $200 and
$300.
By Contrast
By contrast, tuition at Harvard
last year was $1,318. This year it is
$1,520.
Other :tuition and fee charges
at typical private universities last
year: University of Southern Cali-
fornia, $1,012; Johns Hopkins,
$1,207; University of Denver, $782;
Duke, $1,000; Southern Methodist
University, $725, and Baylor, $495.
These comparisons can be de-
ceptive. All private institutions
provide scholarship and/or loans
to worthy and needy students,
spmetimes for full tuition plus
room and board and other ex-
penses.
HarvardCheaper
Thus, it W$ at least possible that
for some high school graduates it
is cheaper to go to Harvard than
to a state university or college.
Tuition and fees, of course, make
up only a small part of the total
cost of going to college,
rA survey at the University of
Illinois last year showed that the,
average single student spent
$1,744. This included tuition $280,
room and board $820, books and
supplies $88, clothing and personal
and medical care $174,'recreation
$156, transportation $122, and
miscellaneous $104.
Nontuition costs would be at
least as high in a private college
or university.
Total Cost
Since tuition makes up only a
fraction of the total cost of college,
why shouldn't it be raised at a
time when all institutions -of high-
er education are in a financial
bind?
Those who want tuition held j
low argue:
1) Since a college education is
estimated to add $100,000 to life-
time earnings the public should
help foot the -bill; eventually it
will be paid back out of taxes onj
the added income of the ,students.
The GI Bill that sent thousands of
World War II GI's to college has
already paid for itself and con-
tributes $15 billion a year in taxes
on income of the GI graduates.
2) It's the "great American
dream" that no student should be
denied college education for lack
of money.
Higher Tuition;
Those who favor higher tuition
argue:
1) Since the student's family is
the direct recipient of the bene-
fits of a college-educated child, it
should make a bigger contribution
to this blue chip investment.
2) Both public and private col-
leges are finding it increasingly;
hard to finance operations, either
because of economy minded legis-'
latures or saturation of the gift
and grantsources.
Private Colleges
The private colleges say that
when tuition is raised, loans and
scholarships can be offered those

who need financial help.
Also, since almost everything
else is now purchased on long-
term credit, why not a college edu-
cation through loans?
Scholarships, public proponents
contend, are not the answer to
high tuition rates. If the scholar-
ship is based on high aptitude, _the
student of, only average ability is
out of luck. ,If it is based on ability
to pay, it becomes a welfare pro-
gram.,
They are even more bitter
against the proposition that a stu-
dent or his family should go into
debt for a college education.,
And so, while costs climb up and
up, the arguments rage.

-Daily-Ed Langs
REGISTRATION-A Peace Corps volunteer to work in Thailand
fills out a form upon registering for training session at the
University. Forty-eight volunteers arrived yesterday to begin
their three months of studies here.
CorpmenA e
To Begin Thai" Training

are that it guarantees the student
a grant as long as he maintains a
certain average and enables him
to aid another student ten years
after he graduates," James A.
Lewis, vice-president for student
affairs, explained yesterday.
The plan was initiated by Mrs.
Rolli Gerstacker of Midland,
Michigan 1959 at Alma College
and other colleges in this state.
This year the Regents voted to
accept her donation and at present
one University student is covered
by the plan.
The donor of this scholarship
contributes an annual grant,
usually $500-$1,000 a year. To
augment this, the University finds
a job for the student. With sum-
mer employment as a third source
of income the student is usually
able to' meet his year's expenses,
Lewis said.
Once out of school the recipient,
assuming the moral obligation to
establish an award for another
student in the future, is expected
to take out a 10-year endowment
life insurance policy in favor of
the University.
Under the policy the recipient
makes a payment every year until
the face value of the policy is
'Ensian Extends
Picture, Deadline.
The deadline 'for making ap-
pointments for senior pictures in
the 'Ensian has been extended un-
til Tuesday, Paul Kynicki, '62,
'Ensian business manager, an-
nounced,
"This will be the last possible
time to make appointments since
the photographers will. complete'
their work by Friday," he warned.
Approximately 500 seniors and
graduate students have not yet
been photographed.

By JUDITH BLEIER
Forty-eight Peace Corpsmen,r
slated for duty in Thailand, ar-
rived here yesterday to begin a1
13-week intensive training pro-t
gram.l
The remainder of the group of
56 persons, 40 men and 16 women,
are expected to arrive today for
briefing sessions- and induction in-
to the Peace Corps.-
The $161,000 center is the Corp's
thirteenth and will run until Jan.1
17. Faculty members and Peace
Corps consultants will tr'ain vol-'
unteers to meet needs of under-
staffed education and public
health institutions in Thailand. 1
They will leave Jan. 19 for
Thailand where they will work,
for two years to combat malaria,a
upgrade general -health, teach
PROGRAM NOTES:
FacultyTrio
Sets Recital
By MARTHA MacNEAL
The musio school will present7
The Baroque Trio, assisted by
double bass Clyde Thompson in a
recital at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
!. Theymembers of the trio are
Marilyn M a s o, harpsichord;'"
Prof. Nelson Hauenstein, flute,
and Prof. Florian Mueller, oboe.
India Program *.
"The Beautiful Indrani," brought
to the United States by the Asia
Society Performing Arts. Program,
will appear in a program of clas-
sical Indian dance at 8:30 p.m.'
Wednesday in the Ann Arbor High
School auditorium, under the lo-c
cal sponsorship of the India Stu-,
dents Association. Tickets are
available at the International
Center.
Carillon Recital...
Percival Price, University caril-
lonneur, will present two carillon
recitals, at 7:15 p.in. Thursday
and 12 noon Saturday at Burton
Tower, under the auspices of the
School of Music.
Science, Society ...
' The University's television se-
ries, ACCENT, "will present "Sci-
ence and Society," .an evaluation
of the interrelationships and im-
pact of science and social values,
by Lloyd Berknener, president of
the Associated Universities. The
program will be broadcast at 7:30
a.m. Saturday on station WJBK.;

English and improve instructional
methods in higher education.
The Corpsmen will average 60
hours weekly in seminars, lec-
tures' and labs with faculty mem-
bers in the education school, pub-
lic health school and literary col-
lege.
Thirteen hours per week will
be devoted to learning the Thai
language. This is the most inten-
sive language training program
that the. Peace Corps is presently
offering, Prof. Robert C. Leetsma,,
of. the education school, project
director, said.
The group will be divided into
three sections, eradicating malaria,
teaching English and working in
vocational education or at Chula-
longkorn University in Bangkok.
The volunteers' first aim will
be to gather knowledge of the
Thai people and culture. A "com-
mon core" program required of
all volunteers will feature train-
ing in the Thai language, culture
and area studies, coordinated by
Prof. William J. Gedney, of the
Far Eastern languages and litera-
ture department.
The corpsmen will live in South
Quadrangle and East Couzens
Hall. Married students will have
facilities at the Michigan Union.
Women will have breakfast at
Couzens, but all other meals will
be served in the quadrangle.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the Fall semester should register by
OCTOBER 10, 1961. Forms available,
3011 Student Activities. Building. Ex-
ception to this procedure is subject to
Student Government Council approval.
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Sharon Jeffrey, Slide-Talk
on her summer in Guinea, Oct. 8, 7:30
p.m., 802 Monroe.
Gamma Delta (Lutheran Stud. Club),
Orientation, 5:30 p.m.; Supper, 6 p.m.;
Initiation of New Members, Oct. 8,
1511 washtenaw.
* * *
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking, Oct.
8,' 2 p.m., Rackham Bldg., Huron 'St.
Entrance.
* * *
LaSociedad Hispanica, Tertulia,-Oct.
9, 3-5 p.m., 3050 YB.
Women's Senate, Meeting, Oct. 10, 4:10
p.m., League.
Voice Political Party, Discussion of
Issues, of Elections; Committee Re-
ports, Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m., Union, Em.
3G.

Buster Keaton's

s not
but he
jewis

THE
GENERAL
(U.S., 1927)

and

'----

--E

emphasized.
Regent Eugene B. Powers also
backed the idea. "It seems an ex-
cellent plan because it encourages
moral responsibility and helps an-
other student later on.
"Too often students think of
scholarship as a gift and forget
that someone has to provide it,"'
he said.
The possibility should also be
considered -of giving freshmen a
larger grant than upperclassmen
since a student's summer earning"
power increases as he gets older,
Power said.
LARGE HALL
available for.
* PARTIES
BANQUETS
* DANCES
1917 Jackson Ave. NO 3-3401
I GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY

DUPLICATE
BRIDGE
Every Tuesday Nite
7:3 0 P.M.
VFW HOME-
314 E. Liberty
NO 2-3972
DIAL NO 2-6289
Now on the-screen! That
lovable, happy-go-lucky
"Sound of Music" family
. . singing their way
right into your heart!

1

DIAL 8-6416
Continuous Today from 1 P.M.'
"A film of rare beauty
and exquisite tenderness!"
---N. Y. CUE MAGAZINE.
"A joyful film...
the acting is splendid!"
"-N. Y. HERALID-TRIBUNB
"It has dignity... humor
...and genuine feeling...
wiversalin its unadorned appeal!"
-N. Y. TIMES

01

:-

D. W. Griffith's
THE NEW
YORK HAT
(U.s., 1912)
Monday, Oct. 9, at- 8 P.M. in
Rackhom Amphitheatre. Admis-,
sion is by subscription only. A
subscription for the full 10
showings in the 1961-62.series
costs $5.00. For further infor-
motion, call 663-6001.

The inspiring story of a
beautiful girl . . . who
left her convent to- give
her love to a man-'-and
her songs to the world!
a'I
-i

I

-'

Uw

"''""

The
YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM

present

WM. F. BUCKLEY JR.
Editor: National Review
speaking on
"SUPERSTITIONS OF
ACADEMIC FREEDOM"

I

Awardcd theGolden Lion of St. Mork
fa the Venice Filn Festival.
starring TOSHIRO MIFUNE
.rlforgetable Sta, of "asbomon.'.
Also lovely Hideko Takamine
Directed 'by Hlroshil agaki
Produced 'by Toho Co., Ltd.
In Tohoscope and the most
Magnificent Color Fhoto grap
ever to reach the screenI

MI. CUPID
THIS~
DIAL 5-6290 'LVERS
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER--uoSUniwcTIrnAC TORF Or"SPARTRCuS"
SadraDEE John GAVIN
'th e -
socked da n
* Na N

AKIMWMFF:

Michigan Union BalIroom

fl

THURSDAY, OCT. 12
Admission free

4:15

s

S.G.C.
TONIGHT at 7 and 9
Dickens'
AT TALE OF
TWO CITIES

aseautifutvivid, striking"I.N.Y.Thmos
"Tremendbus
mpact"
A..Herald Tribune
INDRANI
with Her Dancerst
and Musicians I
TEMPLE RHYTHMS OF INDIA
FIRST TRANSCONTINENTAL TOUR
,MWN),0,OVAVA aocK V.mPERiORNAry O ARTS AIV.,

presented by
INDIA STUDENTS
ASSOC IATION
Wednesday, Oct. 11
Ann Arbor H.S. Auditorium
Tickets: $1.50 or $2.50
at International Center
Daily 8-8 P.M.

A SPECIAL CONCERT
(Not in the regular series)

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

CHARLES MUNCH, Music Director

SOloist: SAMUEL MAYES, CelliSt

I

11

On Homecoming Weekend-Saturday-0c. 21, 8:30

11

HILL AUDITORIUM

Why did you come to college? To find a wife (or husband)? to get rich af ter graduation?
because your parents made you?
Perhaps one reason was to find purpose and direction to life. If so, let's get together. Our
goal is to enable students to find out why they are here, and what there is 'to work and live
for. We don't claim to have pat and easy answers to all the problems of life. But we know
One who does have meaningful answers, and with Whom you can can have a transforming
relationship-provided, that 'is, you know how to go about this entire matter.

Program

l

ELEGY, in memory of Serge Koussevitsky

Howard Hanson

CONCERTO for Violoncello . . .

. . Saint-Saens

,SYMIPHONYNo. li, in c minor, Op. 68

... Brahms

F

III

i

i

4

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