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October 05, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-05

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

Kennedy Sets Meeting
With Soviet on Berlin

R.
----z.

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
DALLAS - House Speaker Sam Rayburn's condition remained
unchanged-still serious-at Baylor Hospital yesterday.
Attending physicians said they did not know definitely what
is ailing the 79-year-old Texan and may not know for several days.
* * * * -
THE HAGUE - The Netherlands does not intend to enter,
into negotiations with Indonesia on the Dutch New Guinea dispute,
premier Jan De Quay told parliament yesterday. Such discussions
would not guarantee the right

May Subsidize
CampaignCos
WASHINGTON (P)--The costs
of the'1960 presidential campaigns
have been estimated at $100 mil-
lion.
The question arises whether the
federal government should chip in
on thebill for choosing its chief
executive.
President John F. Kennedy ap-
pointed a nine-member commis-
sion yesterday to study that, along
with other ideas about cutting the
costs of campaigns.
Kennedy noted in a 'statement
that funds for national campaigns
traditionally had been supplied
wholly by private contributions.
"It is not healthy for the demo-,
cratic process--or for ethical
standards in our government-to
keep our national candidates in
this condition of dependence,"
President Kennedy said.s

f of self-determination for New
Guinea Papuans, he said.
The island republic claims West
New Guinea, which the Dutch re-
tained when they freed the rest
of the island chain in 1949.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The White
House announced that Dr. Cheddi
Jagan, premier of British Guiana,
will call on President John F.
Kennedy at the latter's invitation
in the week of Oct. 23.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Com-
merce Department said yester-
day it licensed only $907,000 worth
of goods in September for ship-
ment to Communist bloc coun-
tries - the lowest for any month
since 1955.
* * *
NEW YORK - The stock mar-
ket staged its biggest advance in
nine months today with rail is-
sues rolling ahead of all other
groups. ,

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To Consider
Big Talks
Ont Problem
May Exchange Views
At Informal Meeting
WASHINGTON (P) - Presideni
John F. Kennedy and Soviet For-
eign Minister -Andrei 'Gromyk
will meet tomorrow for a confer-
ence which may well -determine
whether the Big Four get togeth-
er later this year to try to solve
the Berlin problem.
A White House announcement
confirmed speculation that Gro-
myko will call on Kennedy to-
morrow. The meeting is scheduled
to start at 5 p.m.
State Department experts stress-
ed that nothing dramatic should
be expected from the Kennedy-
Gromyko meeting.
To- Restate
The President, these officials
said, will restate the arguments
Secretary of State Dean Rusk has
already outlined in talks with the
Russians in New York. There is
hope that Gromyko will be con-
vinced of Western firmness on
what can and what cannot be
negotiated at an eventual four-
power conferen'ce.
The Friday conference, there-
fore, will likely be an informal
talk in which both sides spell out
their respective positions. Offi-
cials said, however, the possibil-
ity that Gromyko might have re-
ceived new instructions from Mos-
cow cannot be excluded.
But they see the chances of a
shift in the Soviet position prior
to the forthcoming Communist
party congress as almost nil.
The State Department said
there are no plans for separate
conferences between Rusk and
Gromyko. Earlier it was assumed
that the two foreign policy chiefs
would resume their New York
talks here, concluding with a call
on Kennedy.
Rusk to Assist
Rusk, of course, will be at Ken-
nedy's side when Gromyko visits
the White House. The Russian is
expected to be accompanied by
his ambassador, Mikhail Menshi-
kov.
In a related move it was an-
nounced thateLlewellyn E. Thomp-
son, the United States envoy to
Moscow, will return to Washing-
ton for consultations. But he is
not due here in time to sit in on
the conference with Gromyko.
His trip to Washington is sig-
nificant for another reason. Au-
thorities here do not expect a
continuation of the American-
Soviet dialogue on the foreign
ministers level in the near future.
It is assumed that talks will go
on at the ambassadorial level.
Thompson, officials said, plans
to go' back to Moscow in time to
be there when the Communist.
party congress opens Oct. 17.
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Bloomfield Hills), former state
'First Stages
Of, Convention
Go Smoothly
By MARK BLUCHER
The main auditorium of Lan-
sing's Civic Center was barely fill-
ed Tuesday as Secretary of State
James Hare rapped the gavel and
called to order Michigan's first
Constitutional Convention in four
decades.,
Television men manned their
cameras as delegates moved slow-
ly to their seats, chairs scraping
the floor. Silence held the large
arena.
Opening day moved quickly
through the usual anenities and
welcoming speeches by Governor
John B. Swainson, Lansing's may-
or Willard J. Bowerman and oth-
er assembled dignitaries.
Double Call
The time consuming reading of
the certified delegates commenc-
ed only to be followed by roll call
of the same 144 names and the
swearing in of convention mem-
bers.
The major business of the day,
election of a convention presi-
dent, proceeded like an extremely
well-oiled machine.
An air of great co-operation and
bipartisanship seemed to pervade
the great hall as delegates from
both parties moved, seconded, and
voted unanimously on the mo-
tions presented.
Reporters Circulate
At adjournment, friends and
relatives of the delegates moved
onto the temporary meeting area
to greet and congratulate the
convention members. Reporters
could be seen hopping from group
to group asking questions and ob-
tamning opinions.
Later the same afternoon in the
main ballroom of one of Lansing's
major hotels the delegates ap-
peared in groups of twos, threes,
and fours at a lavish reception
held in their honor.
Experts Plan
Tour of Cities
WASHINGTON RP) - President
John F. Kennedy is sending blue-
ribbon teams of experts on domes-
tic problems to 10 major cities
next month to do some pulse feel-
ing.
It will provide the administra-
tion a chance to sell its home-
front program at the grass-roots.
Cabinet officers and top agency
heads will be on the teams of
four or five members who will
discuss urgent national problems
and future needs, the White House
announced yesterday. The Presi-
dent will not participate personal-
ly, but will receive reports after
each session.
Those invited to the two-day
meetings will include state and
municipal officials, civic groups
and interested citizens, the White
House said.

Senator Edward Hutchinson (R-
Fennville) and Tom Downs (D-
Detroit), an AFL-CIO attorney.
Hutchinson and Romney were
major rivals in a pre-convention
Republican caucus.
Hutchinsoh was the choice of
the conservative bloc, and Rom-
ney was supported by the moder-
ate-liberal wing. But Nisbet be-
came the compromise selection
after ,the Hutchinson-Romney
forces became deadlocked in pro-
longed balloting.
Nisbet said he planned to con-
sult with the three vice-presidents
on the matter of committee mem-
berships, and the question of how
to select the committee chairmen.
Every Delegate
The convention decided to set
up 13 committees, nine of them
substantive. Every delegate will
serve on at least one of the sub-
stantive groups.
In deciding on the number of
committees and how many dele-
gates would be -named to each,
the convention followed the rec-
ommendations of the committee
on permanent organization and
rules, headed by Richard C. Van
Dusen (R-Birmingham).
List Committees
The recommendations called
for substantive committees to deal;
exclusively with finance and tax-
ation, one on declaration of
rights, suffrage and elections, on
legislative organization, legislative
powers, the executive branch, the
judicial branch, local government.
and education.
Four other committees also will
be established on style and draft-
ing, administration, public infor-
mation, and rules and resolutions.
Lee Boothby (R-Niles) said he
wanted to remind the delegates
that they were costing the tax-
payers $144,000 a month in salar-
ies alone.
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-AP Wirephoto
DISCUSS RULES-The first appointed committee of the con-
stitutional convention met yesterday to establish permanent
organization and rules. Fred I. Chase, convention clerk, and
Richard C. Van Dusen (R-Oakland), committee chairman, sit
at the head of the table.
Convention N"Lames 'Troika'
To Aid Nisbet with Revision
LANSING (W)-Michigan's Constitutional Convention named a
"troika" of three vice-presidents-two Republicans and a Democrat
-yesterday to assist President Stephen Nisbet (R-Fremont) in guid-
ing the convention in its task of rewriting the state's basic law docu-
ment.
List Vice-Presidents
The three were American Motors President George Romney (R-

China Cites
Impending
UN Disaster
UNITED NATIONS ( ) - Na-
tionalist China warned yesterday
the United Nations faces disaster
if international bullies have thei-
way on adding members "clearly
disqualified" by provisions of the
UN charter.
"Appeasement is very much in
the air," Shen Chang-Huan, na-
tionalist foreign minister, told the
100-nation assembly which will
come to grips soon on the issue
of seating Communist China.
As usual, the entire Soviet bloc
snubbed Nationalist China and
left the assembly hall when Shen
spoke.
Gromyko Listens
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko showed up to listen to
the next speaker, Romanian For-
eign Minister Corneliu Manescu,
who called for admission of Com-
munist China and the ousting of
the Chinese Nationalists.
Shen declared the United Na-
tions "is now in danger of being
perverted to serve the interests of
powerful warmakers and interna-
tional bullies.
"If they are allowed to have
their way," he added, then the
era of collective aggression, not
of collective security, is upon us.
Grim State
"This is .a grim state of affairs,
indeed. Unless the majority of the
state members accept the reality
of the danger and unite their ef-
forts to meet it, the United Na-
tions is destined to go the way of
the League of Nations."
He told neutral nations who are
supporting seating of Red China
that they are being used by the
Communists.
He said it was clear neutalism
was "anathema to the Comnmu-
nists," and they have no more love
for a third force in international
life than they have for capital-
ism.
"Neutralism is being used to
soften up the free world's resist-
ance to Communism," he declared.
"I trust that the leaders of the
majority of the neutralist states
are far too intelligent and sophis-
ticated to play in the hands of
international Communism."
Syria Arrests
Spy Suspects
DAMASCUS, Syria OP)-Syria's
revolutionary goernment an-
nounced yesterday it has rounded
up infiltrating saboteurs who had
been hired abroad.
It hinted strongly they were on
Egypt's payroll.
The captives were in the pay of
"those who claim Arabism, claim
faith in unity," declared informa-
tion minister Mustafa Baroodi in
a statement broadcast by Damas-
cus radio.
President Nasser of the now-
sundered United Arab Republic is
the No. 1 exponent of unifica-
tion of all Arabs, from Northwest
Africa to the Persian Gulf.
Nasser has called the Syrian re-
volt last week against Cairo's rule
a setback "which must be the
starting point for destroying re-
action and treason" throughout
the Arab sphere.
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