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October 04, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-04

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r, OCTOBER4,1961 THE TICHIGAN DAILY

Schools Accept
In Memphis In]

Negroes
Leg9rati on

-AP Wirephoto
ON WAY TO SCHOOL--Three of the 13 Negro children who entered Memphis' previously all-white
schools yesterday morning meet with reporters on their way to school. The entrance of these children
ended without incident the century long segregation in Memphis.

Gets Report
On Al
WASHINGTON (P) - President
John F. Kennedy spent two hours
yesterday getting up-to-date re-
ports on the efforts of this coun-
try and its allies to bolster the
military might of the North At-
lantic Treaty Organization.
The briefing was, begun by De-
fense Secretary Robert S. McNa-
mara and Gen. Lyman L. Lem-
nitzer, chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff. It was capped by
a first-hand report from Europe
by Gen. Lauris Norstad, supreme
commander of NATO.,
Secretary of State Dean Rusk,
who gave Kennedy a run-down
Monday on the diplomatic situa-
tion in the Berlin crisis, sat in on
the military discussions.
There was no word from the
White House afterward on what
was said. The participants left by
a side door, with Rusk leaving a
bit earlier than the others.
One purpose of the session was
to enable Kennedy to catch up on
the details of the latest develop
ments in view of his meeting later
this week with Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko.
There still was no datemsetfor
the Kennedy-Gromyko meeting,
nor for the Russian's further talks
with Rusk. But White House
sources indicated that the Presi-
dent likely will receive the Krem-
lin's foreign policy expert on Fri-
day.
Should Gromyko come to Wash-
ington only during the second half
of the week this would allow only
a limited number of meetings with
Rusk.

'NOT IN TROUBLE':
Hodges ,,Asks Less Aid
For Depressed Areas
WASHINGTON (M)-Secretary of Commerce Luther H. Hodges,
said yesterday many of the counties designatedsby his department as
depressed areas are really not in trouble and don't need federal aid.
"I wish a lot of them would pull out," Hodges told a news confer-
ence. He said many could do a proper economic development job using
local resources.
Hodges was surprisingly outspoken in discussing the $394-million
federal program which his department administers. However, not all
his remarks were critical. He said

No Violence
Follows Act
By Officials
Use News Blackout
To Keep City Calm
MEMPHIS () A century of seg-
regation ended in Memphis yes-
terday with 13 Negro first graders
admitted to white schools guarded
by a massive police turnout.
Police Commissioner , Claude
Armour reported there were no
incidents. Fifty patrolmen, billy
clubs in hand, patrolled the area
around each of the four schools
involved.
Desegregation was voluntary, al-
though due to indirect pressure
from a federal suit now pending
on appeal. The school board pre-
pared for it in near secrecy.
News Blackout
For many residents, integration
came as a jolt. They got their
first word of it this morning when
a news blackout was lifted.
Attendance at the schools was
reported nearly normal despite a
trickle of bitterly outspoken white
mothers who hustled their young-
sters out of classes. About 25
students were removed by parents,
officials reported.
"We will either transfer him or
move plumb out of the city," said
Mrs. HermanMcGregor after pull-
ing her 9-year-old son out of
his fourth grade class. "We may
go back to Mississippi where they
don't let them go to school with
whites."
'Rather Be Dumb'
"Yeah," said Jerry McGregor.
"I'd rather be dumb than go to
school with them."
William D. Galbreath, school
board president, said no transfers
to other schools would be granted
to pupils dissatisfied with deseg-
regated schools.
Inside the schools, spokesmen
reported all was serene. Teachers
had prepared their classes for the
new pupils. The wide-eyed new-
comers moved through the school
day without restriction.
The 8 girls and 5 boys were
carefully chosen from 42 who ap-
pealed to the city Board of Educa-
tion 'after their applications for
admittance to white schools were
rejected last month.
Kennedy Signs
Education Bill
WASHINGTON () - President
John F. Kennedy last night sign-
ed into law the bill extending for
two years the program of federal
aid for schools crowded because
of federal activity in their areas.
The measure also continues for
two years the National Defense
Education Act providing loans to
college students and other aids to
teaching of science, mathematics
and foreign languages.
This measure was all that Con-
gress granted the President of
the ambitious federal aid to edu-
cation program he proposed this
year.

Take Four
In Air flight
Into Berlin
BERLIN (P)-A United States
Army helicopter flew five East
German refugees from the Stein-
stuecken enclave yesterday, dupli-
cating a rescue that angered Com-
munist East Germany last week.
Steinstuecken is a village of 200,
a suburban part of the American
sector -of West Berlin surrounded
by Communist territory and Com-
munist fencing, freshly reinforc-
ed.
Military communication between
the American sector proper and
the village is by helicopter. Two
such craft plucked seven East
German refugees from the village
last week and flew them to West
Berlin.
Makes Accusation
The East German Foreign Min-
istry accused the Americans of
violating'East German air space.
The United States Berlin com-
mand, in announcing the operation
yesterday, said the five were tak-
en aboard "during a routine vis-
it."
The incident, coincided with a
Soviet Embassy announcement
that Marshal Ivan S. Konev, com-
mander of Soviet foices in East
Germany, has warned the Ameri-
can army not toastir up trouble
that could upset East-West nego-
tiations on Berlin.
Avoid Friction
A spokesman said Konev, trans-
erred to East Germany recently
from command of the Warsaw
Pact armies, had written Gen.
Bruce C. Clarke, commander of
the United States Army in Eu-
rope, to avoid any action that
could cause friction.
Clarke's headquarters in Heid-
elberg confirmed that a letter was
received from the marshal and
said Clarke had answered it.
The correspondence appeared to
relate mainly to a United States-
Soviet squabble about United
States patrols on the autobahn
between Berlin and West Ger-
many.
World News
Roundun
By The Associated Press
ELISABETHVILLE - Katanga
and United Nations authorities
yesterday accused each other of
violations of the two-weeks-old
temporary cease-fire agreement.
Renewed tensions seem to lie
ahead.
* * *
BONN-Poland, Czechoslovakia
and East Germany have increased
their military forces 20 per cent
in the last eight weeks, authori-
tative West German military
sources said yesterday.
WASHINGTON - The country
gained an inch or so last month on
the stubborn problem of jobless-
ness and can expect some real im-
provement this month, the Labor
Department reported yesterday.
Unemployment dipped by 4.,000
in September to a total of 4,085,-
000.
NEW YORK-The Dow Jones
stock averages split in, their clos-
ing last night with industrials and
the general trend going down
slightly, rails and utilities up.
slightly.

DAMASCUS (P) -=The revolt
that split Syria from the United
Arab Republic was originally plan-
ned to halt weakening of the
Syrian army by the Egyptians
rather than as a political move-
ment, the army's new commander
in chief said yesterday.
Gen. Abdel Karim Zahredin
told newsmen President- Gamal
Abdul Nasser's intelligence offi-
cers had infiltrated "like an octo-
pus to weaken the Syrian army,
suffocate freedom of citizens and
to fill prisons."
He accused the Egyptians of
stealing military arms and equip-
ment worth 10 million Syrian
pounds ($28 million at the official
exchange rate) and shipping them
off to Cairo.
Redress Wrongs
"The army's only aim ( in re-
volting) was to redress wrongs and
it was pledged not to interfere
with the political life of Syria,"
Zahredin said.
The top six officers and other
members of the revolutionary
command have reportedly gone
back to their army jobs and are
not mixing in government. The
new commander in chief himself
was not involved in the coup.
,The new 12-man cabinet, most
of whose members have almost no
government experience, is consid-
ered decidedly pro-Western by ob-
servers.
Might Lose Backing
But a declaration to that effect
would raise cries of "imperialism"
that might endanger public sup-
port for the new regime.
UAR Asks U.S.
To'Hold Policy
WASHINGTON (R)-The Unit-
ed Arab Republic has asked the
United States to ignore Syria's re-
quest for diplomatic recognition,
diplomatic sources reported yes-
terday.
The request of President Gam-
al Nasser's government ,reached
the State Department through
normal diplomatic channels Mon-
day, informants said.
The United States, a UAR diplo-
mat was told, is still considering
the Syrian request and no imme-
diate decision should be expected.
Coeds:
"Let us style a
FLATTERING HAIR-DO
to your individual needs."
- no appointmehts needed -
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near Michigan Theatre

SYRIAN COUP:
Call Revolt Non-Poll

Interior Minister Adnan Ku-
watly told newsmen the Com-
munist Party will continue to be
banned under existing regulations.
Nasser still has a larger per-
sonal following among Syrians
and the coup would not have suc-
ceeded, informed sources said, ex-
cept for two things:
1) A wave of anti-Egyptian feel-
ing caused by a personal tax im-
posed in August.
Intelligence Setup
2) Nasser's lieutenants had be-
gun dismantling the dreaded in-
telligence network that told them
what was going on. The apparatus
was established by Col. Abdul Ha-
mid Serraj, a Syrian strongman
who was jailed here Sunday and
accused of subversive activities.

DAMASCUS (J)-Re
es here said yesterda;
asked for prompt re
Syrian army and air
cers studying in the S
The Egyptian hig
was reported to have s
'25 to 40 Syrian off
Communist bloc as st
effort to prevent Just
rising as that which ri
to independence last i

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SEATO Group
Holds Meeting
BANGKOK (P) - Top military
planners of the Southeast Asia
Treaty Organization met behind
closed doors yesterday to take up
what a communique called "plans
to resist and counter Communist
aggression in the treaty area."
Crises in Laos and South -Viet
Nam are expected to dominate the
three-day conference.
The chief delegates -'military
commanders from the United
States, Britain, France, Australia,
New Zealand, Pakistan, the Phil-
ippines and Thailand-have made
clear they consider the situation
in those two little countries grave.
Thailand underscored its con-
cern by announcing it plans to
evacuate its villages along the Me-
kong River border with Laos if
fighting breaks out again in that
jungle kingdom.
No details of the agenda were
officiallly disclosed.

.1

1

Oct. 1-7 is NATIONAL BUSINESS WOMEN'S WEEK.
For the Business and Professional women of the Cam-
pus and Ann Arbor and vicinity, we are having OPEN
HOUSE TOMORROW 6:30 till 9:00 P.M. to come in
BROWSE-BUY; (model if you like) Sell your friends

at one point that applications for
aid aren't beiyg approved fast
enough.
This seeming conflict stemmed
from a distinction which Hodges
drew between two types of coun-
ties designated as depressed.
In urging withdrawal from the
program he was speaking primar-
ily about rural counties which are
eligible for aid because the aver-
age income of their farm families
is less than $1,170 a year. There
are 487 counties in this category.
Aid also is being offered to 376
other' countries. Most of these are
urban areas designated because of
substantial and persistent unem-
ployment.
A number of rural counties have
protested against their inclusion
in the program, and Hodges said
they have a point.
"I think psychologically it is
bad to be called a depressed
area," he said, but added:
"On the one hand the county
or the people resent being called
a depressed area and on the other
hand quietly reach out and get
whatever they can.,,+
Hodges said that of the 863
counties which are considered de-
pressed, "You would find a fairly
good lot of 'them that are really
not in trouble.
"If I were chairman of the
county commissioners I'd get my
group together... and I'd say,
'Let's stay out of this thing'."
Test Rayburn
For Operation
DALLAS (1') - Doctors made
more tests yesterday on House
Speaker Sam Rayburn to deter-
mine whether anoperation will be
necessary for a suspected liver ail-
ment or other internal indisposi-
tions.
An attending. physician said it
will be today or perhaps longer
before tests are complete. Physi-
cians then will determine what
must be done.
A doctor said the 79-year-old
Rayburn remained under heavy
sedation yesterday.Late Monday
he walked into Baylor Hospital
under his own power.
John Holton, Rayburn's admin-
istrative assistant, termed the
speaker's condition serious but not
,critical.

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Assistant Dean, School of Music
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EVERYONE WELCOME

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I,

Wednesday, October 4, 1961
The University of Michigan Newman Club
Father Richard Center
331 Thompson

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,I READING and DISCUSSION SEMINAR:

E I S AM . E o "A oft SAME 1 1 1 1 '"1T 1~ A . ,.

7 'i. i ii 0.1,11

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