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September 28, 1961 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-28

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EIGST

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTE ER i , 7

EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28.

U' Professors To Direct Thailand Training Center for Peace Corps

(Continued from Page 1)
and assigned library readings will
all be used to familiarize the vol-
unteers with the Thai culture,
Prof. Gedney said.
Describes Duties
Prof. Felheim describes his job
as providing for each of the vol-
unteers to look at American cul-
ture, institutions, and values."
"It is not for us to suggest an-
swers to them (for the questions
the Thai people will ask), but to
teach them ways of finding the
answers."
Though there will be no part
of the program designed especially
to survey current events, they will
naturally be discussed to some ex-
tent when the volunteers study
means of communication such as
television, magazines and news-
papers, he explained.

However, our schedule does in-
clude some specialized lectures in
American foreign affairs with em-
phasis on South-east Asia, Prof.
Felheim continued.
It will also be essential for the
volunteers to read the New York
Times, so they will get in the
habit of being informed.
In general, this particular part
of the program will attempt to
make the volunteers see the na-
ture of their concept of America
and to understand their own
biases. With this understanding
it is hoped that they will be better
prepared to explain America to
the Thai people.
Reiff pointea out that there are
two primary objectives to the phy-
sical education program being
planned.,
The first deals with the volun-
teer's physical fitness. During, the

beginning of the training his fit-
ness will be appraised. Such
things as his general motor ability,
his cardiomuscular endurance, his
strength and his flexibility will be
measured.
Then each volunteer will be
given a "vigorous" program (and,
Reiff emphasizes, it will be vig-
orous) so that he can improve his
fitness in the areas where he is
weak.
Orient Trainees
In addition the instructors hope
to orient the trainees regarding
the requisites and benefits of
maintaining physical fitness
throughout their entire life, Reiff
said.
The second objective deals with
sports skills. In this area the in-
structors will attempt to improve
the trainees' competence in sports
as well as to instruct them in the

popular sports practiced in Thai-
land.
Reiff lists track, field, and soc-
cer as the Thai national sports.
They are very good with their feet,
he added.
Prof. Robert A. Bowman of the
public health school, states that
the emphasis in the health and
hygiene program "will be placed
on an understanding of the per-
sonal and environmental health
problems in Thailand and the per-
sonal measures necessary to main-
tain good physical and mental
health while working in Thailand."
Disease Control
Special consideration will be
given to communicable disease
control, to tuberculosis and other
respiratory diseases, to veneral
diseases, and to food, water and
insect-borne diseases.
Volunteers will also receive in-

struction in the use of drugs, and
other contents of a personal medi-
cine chest which each will receive
so they will know how to care
for themselves in case of illness.
Other lectures will be delivered
on nutrition and mental health.
In conjunction with this health
program, the local Red Cross unit
will donate a course in first aid
and safety.
Instruction in only two of the
four special fields will be stressed
here at the University: the teach-
ing of English as a foreign lan-
guage and malaria eradication.
The Peace Corps volunteers who
will teach at Chulalongkorn Uni-
versity, Thailand's most outstand-
ing educational institution, will
be asigned work after they reach

Thailand according to their ex-
perience and abilities.
Those who specialize in trade
and industrial education (whether
their area be carpentry, welding,
plumbing, etc.) will already be
qualified in their field.
Prof. Edward M. Anthony of
the English Language Institute
will supervise the instruction of
those volunteers who will teach
English as a foreign language to
the Thai.
In addition to teaching methods,
they will be taught the aural-
oral approach to teaching a lan-
guage. This means their students
wil learn to speak English before
they learn to write it, he said.
As teachers the volunteers will
need to be aware, too, of the par-

ticular difficulties the Thai will
have in learning English. For ex-
ample there are several sounds in
English that do not exist in Thai.
Verb Endings
Also the idea of adding endings
to verbs is unknown to the Thai
language.
Dr. Richard J. Porter of the
public health school will direct
the training of the students who
will assist in the malaria eradica-
tion program.
The volunteers will serve as
etomologists and laboratory tech-
nicians in a five-year campaign
against malaria.
If the disease can be kept under
control for that period, the threat
of malaria can be nearly elimi-
nated in Thailand, Dr. Porter said.
- I

i /.
/

MORRI LL'S
OFFICE SUPPLIES
314 South State St. NO 5-9141

4

MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR SAVING:
N E A Director Views Education Breakthrough

t'

By G. K. HODENFIELD
Associated Press Education Reporter
WASHINGTON-A real break-'
through in the quality of public
education could save the taxpay-
ers millions of dollars a year, an
official of the National Education
Association said yesterday.
Sam - M. Lambert, director of'
the NEA's research division, said
there are two obvious ways in
which the schools could give the
Panel To View,
UN Problem
Of Red China

.._.

Y

AI
lem
the

panel discussion on the prob-
of Red China's admittance to
United Nations will be held

at 4:15 p.m. today in Rm; 3R of
the Union.
The four participants are from
Hong Kong, Japan, England and:
Scandinavia. They will discuss the
difficulties of admitting any na-
tion to the UN, as well as a list of,
alternatives to the particular sit-
uation involving Red China and
the effects in the panelists' coun-
tries of the United States' policies
on the matter.
Prof. Edgar Willis of the speech
department will moderate.
The panel discussion is spon-
sored by the Union International
Affairs Committee.
'U' Carillonneur
To Give Concert
University carillonneur Percival
Price will present a series of
Thursday recitals beginning today1
at 7:15 p.m.1
Other concerts will be given onI
Oct. 5, 12, 19 and 26 at 7:15 p.m.I
He will also play noon recitals
on each of the Saturday home
football games: Sept. 30, Oct. 7,;
14 and 21.1

public more for its education dol-
lar:
Let the brightest 15-20 per cent
of ninth graders complete their
high school work in three years
instead of four-a saving of rough-
ly $262 million for this group
alone.
Remedial 'Reading
Provide intensive remedial read-
ing work for lagging students so
that they can graduate from high
school in 12 years instead of 13, 14'
or even 15, saving from $337 to.
$779 for each such student.
Both programs, for the bright
students and the laggards, require
better teachers, Lamber said. He
suggested a six-year minimum
teacher-training program, instead
of the usual four.
Lambert told a group of teach-
ers meeting here to discuss salary
problems:
Not Much Change
"For as long as I can remem-
ber, most schools have held the
concept that it should take 12
years to move children from their
ABC's through Chaucer. That is
the way we organized back at the
turn of the century, and we
haven't changed much since."
Probably 5 per cent of the first
graders, he said, are bright enough
to finish the normal 12 grades in
10 or 11 years.
Studies have indicated, he said,
that intensive remedial reading
programs can move a pupil one
full grade ahead in reading abil-
ity in one summer. Even If the
lagging student needs three such
summers of instruction, he said,
such a program would more than
pay for itself.
Some Exposure
He suggested that all prospec-
tive teachers take four years of
general education with some ex-
posure to every field of human
knowledge - including physics,
chemistry and mathematics.
"Such a program," Lambert
said, "might produce a teacher 50
to 100 per cent more effective than

3:00 FRIDAY
T.G.I.F. on the slab
(south end of Angell Hall)
ROCK 'n ROLL NEW "TWIST"
FOLK SINGING for Homecoming
JAZZ-

today's beginning teacher with a
bachelor's degree.
"Of course, all who are gettingI
(teacher) certificates today could
not get through such a program
but, in my opinion, this would be
good for the children and youth
of the country and for the pro-
fession."

Such master teachers would de-
serve and would demand better
pay, Lambert'said, and added:
"I am sure that if we offered
the American public this new con-
cept of teacher prepairation, the
people would be willing to pay
$6,000 beginning salaries and top
salaries of $12,000 or more."

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RONALD A. KNOX
GILBERT HIGHET
C. S. LEWIS
MARK SCHORER
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LOUIS MacNEICE
PERCY SCHOLES
ask your
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