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September 28, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY.

YR's To Host State Conference

Ancient Instruments Shown

ti

By GALE EVANS Prof. Charles Joiner, head of
The University Young Repub- the University's con-con Task
lican Club will be the host for Force, and Prof. Karl Lamb, of the
this weekend's state-wide confer- political science department, will
ence of Young Republicans on the deliver speeches Saturday morn-
impending constitutional conven- ing at 11 a.m. In the afternoon
tion. caucus, all resolutions will be sub-
The conference, will open at 7:30 mitted for approval.
p.m. Friday with keynote speeches Regarding the purpose of this
by Chairman of the Republican conference, YR president and con-
con-con Wendell A. Miles and con- conchrnYSreset c n-r
con delegate from Oakland Coun- con chairman, Steve Stockmeyer,
ty Richard Van Dusen.
All meetings will be held at the S heehanBypasses
League and are sponsored by the . .
Michigan Federation of College Municipal court
Young Republican Clubs.
Following the opening addresses Hugh J. Sheehan, Jr., '62BAd,
the 100 student delegates will charged with stealing $1,300 in
break up into committees on leg-frhg st ig$,Phin
islative, executive, judicial, taxa- furnshings from Sigma Phi fra-
tion and local government issues. ternity house, waived examination
Resolutions will be prepared for inMunicipalvCourt Monday and
presentation during Saturday's was bound over to Circuit Court
sessions, for- trial.

3:00 FRIDAY
T.G.I.F. on the slab
(south end of Angell Hall)

said "we are not attempting to
rewrite the present constitution.
Instead we will adopt general res-
olutions in the major areas of
the constitution."
Copies of the resolutions will be
sent to all con-con members be-
fore the convention convenes Oct.
3, Stockmeyer said.
Of special concern to college
students and administrators will
be the resolutions on the educa-
tion issues, Stockmeyer comment-
ed. A proposal for a state board
of educators to replace regents and
trustees may be suggested.
Proposals dealing with the exec-
utive department are expected to
include suggestions to make ap-
pointive those subordinate admin-
istrative officials (Cabinet mem-
bers) who are not already select-
ed by the governor. A resolution
to extend the term of the governor
to four years also may be pre-
sented.
The controversy between the es-
tablishment of a unicameral as
opposed to the traditional bicam-
eral legislature will be discussed.
Resolutions on the graduated in-
come tax and the "earmarking of
funds" are expected, Stockmeyer
said. The organization of the con-
vention itself will also be reviewed.
The conference on con-con is
part of the annual 'study session
put on by the 25 Michigan Federa-
tion of Young Republican Club
members.
Honors Professor3
To Talk on Politics
Prof. Harold Stein, visiting hon-
ors professor of public and inter-
national affairs from Princeton
University, will speak at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rm. 3S, Michigan Union,
on the national political situation.
Making his first public appear-
ance before a University group,
Prof. Stein will address the Young
Democratic Club meeting.

BITE-SIZE BITER-University doctors have developed this small
instrument to take samples of living intestinal tissue.
'U' Doctors Develop Unit
To Take Intestine Sample

NEW "TWIST"
for Homecoming

COCKTAIL HOUR

5 to 7 P.M.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29
VFW Hall Admission -25c

Sponsored by
GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL

CHALLE NGE

University doctors have develop-
ed a new bite-size apparatus that
will remove tiny samples of liv-
ing samples from a patient's small
intestine without surgery.
The apparatus will be used for
exploratory operations in suspect-
ed stomach cancer and other dis-
orders of the digestive system.
Called a "hydraulic biopsy ap-
paratus," the .instrument is a
stainless steel capsule, which the
patient swallows, attached to a
length of soft plastic tubing.
The capsule contains a razor
sharp cylinder that' is activated
by hydraulic pressure transmitted
down the plastic tube. On each
motion it crosses a small open-
ing in the capsule and slices off a
a microscopic layer of the lining
of the intestine.
The sample is then washed up
through the plastic tube for ex-
amination by the physician. Sev-
eral tissue samples may be taken
before the capsule is removed.
Associate Professors of internal
medicine at the University Doc-
tors Robert J. Bolt and Arthur B.
French began developing the ap-
paratus two years ago. Herbert
Senecal and Edward Rupke of the
University's Office of Research
Administration assisted in its pro-
duction.
About a dozen hand-crafted
models of the capsule, ranging in
size from one and one-half inches
to three-quarters of an inch, have
been made.
Asian Colloquim
Sets India Slides
The first meeting of the South
ern Asia Studies Colloquium will
be held at 8 p.m. today in the
East Conference Rm., Rackham
Bldg. The meeting will be de-
voted to showing slides on India
and refreshments will be served.
Center Announces
Sign-Up Deadline
The deadline for registering in
the Conflict Resolution's Center's
seminar on the "Design of Peace
Research" has been extended un-
til Friday, Mrs. Kenneth Bould-
ing of the center, announced yes-
terday.

The apparatus can also be used
to observe the effects of drugs!
and other substances on the lin-
ing of the stomach and small in-
testine.
Colleges Read
To Add 5,000
New Freshmen
A survey of 200 four-year Col-
leges has shown that 150 of themj
are prepared to increase their
freshman class next fall, the Stu-
dent Admissions Center reported.
These 200 institutions alone will
admit 5,000 to 6,000 more fresh-
men than they were able to ac-
commodate this fall.
Based on this sample, the re-
port estimates that the total num-
ber of freshman places in the
country will increase eight to elev-
en per cent. This year enrollment
increase is estimated at seven per
cent.
The survey also reported that of
40 state universities that answered
a questionnaire, 30 had no re-
stricted quotas for out-of-state
students.
The report also found that the
academic requirements forhcollege
admission continue to tighten. Al-
most 90 per cent of the sample
institutions said they required the
College Board achievement tests,
scholastic aptitude tests, the Amer-
ican College Testing Program's
examinations or some combina-
tion.
DANCING
Sat. Night 9 to 1
LIVE MUSIC
75c admission
Pittsfield Union Grange
Ann Arbor-Saline Road

By MARTHA MACNEAL
"The Frederick Stearns Collec-
tion of musical instruments is one
of the most outstanding collec-
tions in this country," Prof. Robert
Warner of the music school and
curator of the collection said.
Housed on the second floor of.
Hill Aud., the collection features
woodwinds, such as flutes, clar-
inets, and oboes in nearly all stages
of their historical development.
The collection of brass instru-
ments, horns, trumpets, and trom-
bones is nearly as complete as the
woodwinds. Stringed instruments
are less numerous, and fewer of
their ancestors have been pre-
served, probably because of their
fragility, Prof. Warner explained.
Few Keyboard Examples
Though the collection does not
include many keyboard instru-
ments, a few rare examples are
on exhibit, including a 17th cen-
tury virginal which can still be
played.
Of special interest are many ex-
cellent oriental instruments, many
of which are now extremely rare
in the countriesiofstheir origin.
Some African instruments are
also included.
The collection was donated to
the University by Frederick
Stearns, a drug manufacturer, in
1899. Stearns lived for several
years afterward and continued to
contribute to the collection, which
was moved to Hill Aud. in 1914,
when the auditorium was first
opened.
Collected by'Stearns
Stearns himself collected the
main body of the exhibit during
the latter 18 years of the nine-
teenth century from all over the
world. The collection now includes
about 1500 items.
The collection is maintained
under a small budget of the music
school, Prof. Warner said. Al-
though funds are too limited to
allow the purchase of additional
exhibits, new items are donated
privately "almost every year."
About five years ago, long-
needed improvements were made
in the collection, including full-
time, operational assistants on
duty, general revision of the ex-
hibits -and painting of the cab-
inets.
DIAL NO 2-6264
PLEASE NOTE
3 Shows Daily at 1:00 - 4:30 - 8:10
*A TERRIFIC SHO0W
...AN AMAZING ACHIEVEMENTI'
OO PREMINGER PRESENTS

The University Choir is now
holding auditions for both tenors
and basses, Prof. Maynard Klein
of the music school, director of
the University Choirs, said yester-
day.
This 300-voice group has been
in existence for 12 years. At pres-
ent they are preparing for their
annual Christmas program and
planning another concert for the
spring semester.

Instruments belonging to the
collection are sometimes used in
concerts of early music given by
the concert organization, but such
instruments are usually modern
replicas of the old instruments,
since the authentic items are not
often in playing condition.
Prof. Warner explained that
"there are a good many reasons
for not using the authentic mod-
els, especially for practice. They
are old and valuable, and often

the wood has warped or dried out.
They should be kept in an air-
conditioned place."
Because of a lack of funds,. the
Stearns collection is not open as
often as would be desirable, Prof.
Warner said. It may be seen from
3-4 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays,
and it is always open during any
event in Hill Auditorium, so that
the public may browse before and
after concerts and during inter-
missions.

I

The MICHIGAN UNION
Presents
INTERNATIONAL
SEMIN AR
Students from England, Hong Kong,
Sweden and Japan
give their views on the question
"Should Red China Be Admitted
To The United Nations,?"
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th
4:15 P.M. Room 3R Union

Klein Seeks Tenors, Basses
For Entrance into 'U' Choirs

3 I

r
4

The choir rehearses on Wed-
nesday nights.
A new choir on campus, the Arts
Chorale, is also holding auditions
for tenors and basses. This group
meets at 3 p.m. daily in Aud. D.
Students may receive University
credit for singing with this choir.
Two other newly formed groups
are the Women's Choir and the
University Madrigal Singers.

4

presents

Military Strategy and Potential:
United States and Soviet Union
MALCOLM HOAG Rand Corporation
Thomas Lough and Norman Thoburn, IST
Sunday, Oct. 1-2:30 P.M.
MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM, UGLI
the. UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN BANDS
Present
The
October 13 8:30 P.M. Hill Aud.
All Seats Reserved $1.00 1.50 2.00
TICKETS ON SALE AT HILL AUD. BOX OFFICE
Beginning October 4 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

...J

PAID ADVERT ISEMENT
presents
Thursday and Friday
MIN AND BILL
THE GREAT ADVENTURE
Saturday and Sunday,
THE CH ILDHOOD OF
MAXIM GORKY

t

I

E(ODUS
ADULT EVENINGS AND SUN. $1.25
ADULT WEEKDAY MATINEES .90
CHILDREN UNDER 12. ......... .50

I

~.

11

DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
"A first rate
bit of frivolity."
"-New Yetkur
The .l. Art Ra
r Organiration presmnts
TC HNICO LOR
KENNETH MORE
AND
J. ARTHUR RANK presents
BASIL RADFORD and JOAN GREENWOOD

International Student Association
presents
Yfternatio'nat MIXER
DANCING
ENTER TAINMENT
REFRESHMENTS
SATURDAY, SEPT. 30 Women's Athletic Bldg.
8:30 P.M. N. University & Forest

I

I

_ .

Having made a striking
comeback *in an untypical dra-
matic role in Anna Christie,
Marie Dressler turned with re-
lief to the field of comedy in
which she had always excelled.
In the aging Wallace Beery she
found a perfect foil - the
charming scoundrel, whose
shiftlessness would set off her
own familiarity with mop and
pail. Min and Bill was the first
of a series of comedies in which
these .seasoned actors made a
special appeal to the American
public with its fondness for.
lower-class images, worldly-wise
and a little soiled, ready to love
or fight at the drop of a beer
bottle.
Arne Sucksdorff's The Great
Adventure is the greatest na-
ture film ever made; there were
no dissenting voices when it
first appeared in America six
years ago. It is the product of
the most painstaking, on the
part of its creator, who spent
three years filming it, shot
250,000 feet which were finally
assembled into a film lasting
little more than an hour, and
spent, to mention one instance
of his desire for fidelity, 72
April nights spread over three
successive years to catch the
wood grouse in their proper
light. This is not a candied Dis-
ney product, in which beauti-
ful camera work is sullied by a
wisecracking commentary and a
too prominent, inapposite mu-
sical score. Sucksdorff does not
condescend to nature. His film
of a year on an isolated Swe-
dish farm is not merely accu-
rate and photographically beau-

nature; and The Great Adven-
ture is the apogee of this un-
derstanding. Some American
critics felt that it was too un-
sparing to be shown to chil-
dren, so over-protecting par-
ents might be warned about
this aspect; though we hold
with Auden, "Give each child
that's in our care/as much
neurosis as the child can bear."
What is at least a matter of
topical interest, since Sucks-
dormf could not manage the
costs of production, his ex-
penses were underwritten per-
sonally by that cultivated and
dedicated person, Dag Ham-
marskjold.
After the great flowering of
Soviet film art in the 1920's,
when individual talent found
more encouragement under a
paternalistic system than in
the Hollywood commercial jun-
gle, the next decade, like those
succeeding, was comparatively
bleak. Eisenstein was able to
complete one sound film, Alex-
ander Nevsky, since nationalis-
tic messages are always hon-
ored by political powers. Few
films of distinction could 'make
their appearance in the atmos-
phere poisoned by 'the Moscow
Trials and their aftermath; but
one impressive series emerged,
the Gorky trilogy, directed by
Mark Donskoi. Based on the
lengthy autobiography of the
eminent Soviet man of letters,
the three films called up a,
picture of Czarist Russia that
made legitimate human impli-
cations, were superbly acted,
and were the true revolutionary
descendants of the earlier pro-
ducts of Eisenstein, Pudovkin,

FRIDAY *
BARDOT 0 "THE TRUTH"

Dial
NO 5-6290

PETER H ILFR

Ending
Tonight

Ul

SELLERS * HYE WHITE.
TWO-WAY STRETCH

So.G. COCinemaqil
*
TONIGHT and FRIDAY at 7 and 9:15 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
MIN AND BILL My. CHILDHOOD
with Marie Dressler, Wallace Berry,
A .: .: yD - .. . . .. . . ...

i

SNEAK
PREVIEW
TONIGHT
at 9 P.M.
Produced by MGM. This timely drama
uic :imr l in n:- -f hern c .. ta

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