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September 12, 1961 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SEPTEMBER12.1961

TlE MICHIGAN DAILY

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PAGE TH RE

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iEDICIPLN ARY PROGRAMS:
Area Studies Offer Variety

I

LOWEST PRICES
OFFICEI'S ShlOES
U.S. Army-Navy Type

mm r'

3y SANDRA JOHNSON
1960-61 school year saw the
shment of four new area
centers which will enable

i---

the University in coming ,years to
offer scholars more fully developed
programs in Russian, Far Eastern,
Southeast Asian and Near Eastern
studies.
Functions of these area centers
will be to channel financial aid
in the forms of fellowships,
scholarships and grants to stu-
dents who wish to concentrate
their studies in these areas, to
develop librarynfacilities in their
respective fields, and to co-ordin-
ate the efforts of scholars at the
University whose interests lie in
the same areas.
Appoint Heads
Appointed to head these cen-
ters were: Prof. William Ballis of
the political science department
to the Center for Russian Studies;
Prof. Albert Feuerwerker of the
history department to the Center
for Far Eastern Studies; Prof.
Richard Park of the political
science department to the Center
for Southeast Asian Studies; and
Prof. William Schorger of the an-
thropology department to the Cen-
ter for Near Eastern Studies.
1ST Directs R
For Science, I

Prof. Schorger points out that
the educated peoples of the Near
East and Asia are familiar with
the North American and Western
European cultures. Each year nu-
merous scholars from those parts
of the world come to Europe or
the United States to continue
their studies.
In the United States, however,
there is a noticeable lack of know-
ledge of these others areas of the
world. Students usually confine
themselves to examining only their
own Western culture.
Provide Facilities
Through the area study centers
the University hopes to provide
facilities so that more Americans
can gain a deeper and more thor-
ough understanding of these areas
which have become critically im-
portant to our nation's welfare.
These new area centers will be
organized much in the same way
as the Center for Japanese Studies
has been set up, Prof. Schorger
explained.
However the new centers will
not be established on exactly the
same plan, he continued. When the
Japan center was established, the
idea of area centers was not only
esearch
Industry

new at Michigan, but was also
either untried or newly tackled
at other universities throughout
the nation.
Experimental System
Thus the system and methods
used at Michigan's Japan center
were largely experimental. Now
the new area centers can adopt
those which have proven most
successful and can avoid those
which are ineffectual.
The centers will serve solely as
co-ordinating organs and will not
build up staffs separate from the
rest of the University. Instead
members in the centers will be
drawn from*other departments.
Dual Role
For example, men in the an-
thropology, economics, geography,
history, fine arts, political science
and sociology departments who are
particularly concerned with how
thei field of study applies in
Southeast Asia will all be mem-
bers of the Center for Southeast
Asian Studies, as well as of their
own departments.
These area centers are designed
primarily to offer training to
graduate students, since. their
programs areoften too narrow for
the undergraduate. Nevertheless
it is possible for the undergraduate
who is extremely interested to
concentrate in either Russian, Far
Eastern, Southeast Asian, Far
Eastern, or Japanese studies.

CAMPUS COLLECTIONS--On the Diag or on the streets of the
campus area, the collection bucket for another worthy cause is
on hand.

Especially suitable for-Army R.O.T.C., Navy, R.O.T.C., Air Force R.O.T.C.
and Marching Band members. Sizes 6 to 12, A to F widths. These shoes are
made over comfortable army-navy lasts. Size 13 $8.75.
We also carry a full line of military equipment-Brasso, Spiffy Collar
Stays, military socks, etc.
SAMS STORE
122 East Washington Street
SAMUEL ..BENJAMIN, '27 Lit., Owner
SAVE AT SAM'S STORE

sup, 4wil"Wilo"lli 0.. ..

...:
'

i

(Continued from Page 1)
ment for analyzing the nuclear
structure of heavier elements."
Last winter the University got
a 310-ton magnet core for the
cyclotron which will enable it to
hurl atomic particles at energies
ranging{ from 15 to 40 volts.
The new building, in addition
to the Atomic Energy Commis-
sion-financed cyclotron will house
the University's smaller atom
smasher which is currently being
kept in the Randall Laboratory
basement.
The Institute also runs the Wil-
low Run experimental laborator-
ies, located at the airport about
a 30-minute drive from the cam-
pus.
Recent projects include experi-
mentation with a radar system
which has the advantage of great-
er range and resolution than the
instruments currently in use.
Radar Advances
The system uses red light ra-
diation reflected off targets rath-
er than the conventional micro-
waves.
The latest major part of the
Institute, the Great Lakes Re-
search Division headed by Prof.;
David Chandler of the zoology de-'
partment, was established in
April.
The new devision used to be the
Great Lakes Research Institute
established by the Regents in'
1945.
All the varied activities of the
Institute are coordinated under its1

unifying general field of study,
Space Science and Technology.
Rapid Growth
This field was chosen because
it is growing at such a rapid pace
and because considerable interest
has been expressed in it in Mich-
igan.
Many new industries are also
the result of such research and
the highest calibre of scientists
and engineers are urgently need-
ed inall aspects of this broad
field.
Mowever, not all of the Insti-
tute's goals are tied up with space
science and technology. The gen-
eral goal, as stated in the original
proposal for the Institute, is prog-
ress and recognition for both the
University and the State.
These goals are attracting new
industries to Michigan increasing
prestige of both the state and the
University.,
'U' Recruitment
The Institute has also become
a great incentive for University
recruitment of new faculty, and
the center of technological train-
ing and research in the state.
Prof. Joseph Boyd of the phys-
ics department, director of the In-
stitute, has described its role as
three fold. "It complements acti-
vities of departments that cut
across departmental or college
limits, and initiates and research
in new fields of interest and pro-
vides some state leadership in the
science technological fields as they
relate to the state's industrial and 1
technological developments."

ANN

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Ypsilanti and Metropolitan Airport
FROM
Ann Arbor to Willow Run Airport
Service from Metro Airport to
Michigan Union - Bell Tower -- Allenel in Ann Arbor
- Huron Hotel in Ypsilanti
Leave EVERY HOUR from 7:30 A.M. to midnight
BICYCLE
AUCTION
ABOUT 200 USED BICYCLES TO BE SOLD
SOME NEARLY NEW
(Impounded by University
between December 18 and June 18-
Unclaimed by owners by September 18)
SATURDAY, SEPT. 23
BEGINNING AT 10 A.M.
At

At Ann Arbor Bank, you will find complete banking service. Further-
more, you will find this service prompt, efficient and courteous. Here
are just a few of the advantages that await you at Ann Arbor Bank:
" SPECIAL CHECKING ACCOUNTS " MONEY ORDERS
WITH NO MINIMUM BALANCE
REQUIRED " REGULAR CHECKING ACCOUNTS
" TRAVELER'S CHECKS " CASHIERS' CHECKS
" FOREIGN REMITTANCES . AUTO LOANS AT THE LOWEST
" SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES RATE OF $4 PER $100 PER YEAR
And remember, Ann Arbor Bank has five convenient offices, including
two in the immediate CAIMPUS area ... the one-year-old office at 505
East Liberty Street and 1108 South University Avenue.
complete campus banking...bro'ht to you by...

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