100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 09, 1962 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

imney Readies
'Reveal Panls
i f
I GOVernorshp
By ROBERT SELWA
regarded as "the new hope for the GOP" will announce
norning whether he will be a candidate for the governor-
higan.
George Romney, constitutional convention delegate, chair-
izens for Michigan, and President of the American Motors
n1.
Wendell Wilikie

MORRIS PLAN:
Committee Clears ReapportionmentBill
/o m Ap otin +'B *1-

Wales Criticizes Repu.
For Remarks in Broa

t

..

ly persons see Romney
orse" who became the

GEORGE ROMNEY
.. GOP hopeful?

Stockmeyer
Views Plans,
Students for Romney, organized
Jan. 18, may meet its disolution
tomorrow if constitutional conven-
tion delegate George Romney (R-
Bloomfield Hills) announces that
he wil not seek the GOP guber-
natorial nomination.
However, if Romney proclaims
his candidacy, they "hope to have
a state-wide rally of all Students
for Ronney groups within two
months," Steven Stockmeyer, '63,
ssaid Wednesday.
He explained that from an ini-
tial University group of 25 stu-
dents, the organization has grown
to encompass Michigan State Uni-
versity,' Wayne State University
and Albion and Port Huron Com-
munity Colleges.
In addition, he said, informal
organization procedures are taking
place on 15 other campuses in the
state.
Until now, Students for Romney
has been serving the function of
encouraging Romney to run for
gover'nor. Petitions circulated on
various campuses have drawn
about 500 signatures, Stockmeyer
said.
He presented some of the peti-
tions personally to Romney Tues-
day and pledged the aid of the
group.
If Romney announces his can-
didacy, Students for Romney
members will begin circulating
nominating petitions and will seek
to spark local rallies.
Stockmeyer said that Students
for Romney is drawing up a con-
stitution and will ask Student
Government Council for recogni-
tion at its next meeting.
U' Tops List
With Contracts
For Defense,

as another Wendell Willkie, the
Republican Presidential candidate
in 1940. Romney is being spoken
of as a possible Republican stan-
dard bearer in 1964, particularly
with New York Gov. Nelson
Rockerfeller handicapped by an
impending divorce.
Romney has been delaying his
decision about running for the
governorship for the stated reason
of not injecting partisanship into
the constitutional convention.
A statewide poll by a Detroit
newspaper found that 42 per cent
of the citizens of Michigan would
vote for Romney at this time.
Former Secretary
Romney, 54, has political as-
sets. He is financially independent.
He is a highly active member of
his church. He has experience as
secretary to former Senator David
Walsh (D-Mass), and as general
manager for the Automobile .an-
ufacturers Association during
World War II. He is a recognized
debater and public speaker. His
"profit-sharing" clause in Ameri-
can Motors' contract with the
United Auto Workers gained favor
from labor.
Romney declines to classify him-
self as a liberal or a conservative.
He says he does not think in those
terms but rather tries to identify
problems and issues and what
ought to be done.
He criticizes what he calls union
dominance of the Democratic
party and excessive business in-
fluence in the Republican party.
He calls for a political party "re-
sponsible to citizen control."
Dead Capitalism
Romney says that capitalism is
dead and that America operates
under a system of consumerism,
"American consumerism places
economic control in the hands of
all citizens as consumers, whereas
communism and capitalism vest
ultimate power in the hands of the
few-as did feudalism," he says.
"The word 'capitalism' should
be even more repugnant to Ameri-
cans than to Communists, since
it is a fundamentally inaccurate
representation of our society; yet
we ignorantly continue to use the
word 'capitalism' as our world
trade mark."
Swainson Hits
Plan Requiring
Loyalty Oaths
By The Associated Press
LANSING-Gov John B. Swain-
son yesterday denounced a pro-
posal for legislation requiring all
employes of tax-supported insti-
tutions to take a loyalty oath.
The bill was sponsored by Rep.
Lester J. Allen (R-Ithaca) and
Rep. Frederic J. Marshall (R-Ai-
len). "Some of my constituents
attending the state universities
have informed me that when they
stood up for what they considered
the American way of life, they
were reprimanded and punished
with lower grades," Marshall said.
Swainson objected to the "in-
dignities it places on individuals
by forcing them to recite an oath."
He called the bill "a shopworn
tactic that started in the educa-
tion field-where it is particularly
offensive."
Discrediting the effectiveness of
such a measure, Swainson said,
"It doesn't do any good. A Com-
munist would have no hesitancy
about taking the oath. It simply
offends the sincere individual who
feels strongly about his personal
liberties.
"Those championing the oath
are employing tactics that are in
themselves un-American."
Backing Swainson's stand, Rep.
Joseph A. Gillis, Jr. (D-Detroit)
said, "the universities are provid-

ed for in the State's constitution
and it's unconstitutional for the
Legislature to try to require loyal-
ty oaths of their staffs."
The proposal was part of a
group of bills sponsored by Mar-
shall and referred to the State Af-
fairs and Education committees,
whose chairmen predicted that
they would be reported to the
House floor.

1
r
t
t
t
f
i
i

By MALINDA BERRY
Special To The Daily
LANSING-In spite of protests
by various testifying constituents,
Sen. Carleton H. Morris' (R-Kala-
mazoo) bill for congressional re-
apportionment cleared the Sen-
ate Judiciary Committee Tuesday
after a public hearing.
Sen. Morris' plan calls for a re-
distribution of the state's 19 con-
gressional districts according to a
more stringent population basis.
The major change comes in the
Upper Peninsula, which would be
reduced to one district and one
representative. Other m a j o r
changes would involve the south-
west corner of the state: the third,
fourth and fifth congressional dis-
tricts.
Daily Night Editor Michael Har-
rah, '63BAd, testifying against the
Morris plan, offered an alternative
solution.
Asks Mean Population
Harrah's plan calls for the es-
tablishment of a mean population,
and for each district to approxi-
mate as nearly as possible this
figure. He also urged that an al-
lowance be made for population
growth and shrinkage within each
district, as the apportionment
must continue for "at least a dec-
ade."
"It must be noted that incum-
bent representatives will lend their
knowledge and experience to the
state in years to come, and care
must be taken to avoid forcing
two such incumbents into a pri-
mary race against each other.
"One will inevitably lose, and,
the state will be out his experi-;
ence," Harrah said.
Area Factor
It was also urged that consid-
eration be given to an area or
population sparsity factor. "No
one can suppose," Harrah said,]
"that any elected representative1
charged with a constituency cov-1
ering hundreds of square miles canl
do as thorough a job of represen-1

tation as the representative whose
constituency covers but a few city
blocks."
Harrah describes his plan as
"proven to have the most sought
after characteristics in apportion-
ing the various states and dis-
tricts throughout our nation.
Since these are derivative and
composite characteristics, they are
not the convenient instruments of
any special interests. Rather they
would seem to be tools by which
any fair and equitable apportion-
ment should be fashioned."
Harrah took issue with the Mor-
ris Plan in commenting that it
"fails to make allowance or con-
sideration for population changes.'
Falls Short
He also contends that the plan
"falls far short" in dealing with
the possible problem of two in-
cumbents running against one an-
other.
"The experience and capabili-
ties of the incumbents is all but
disregarded. The present 4th and
5th district congressmen are forc-
ed into a primary race against
each other; the same is true in the
present 11th and 12 districts. Cer-
tainly more regard should be giv-
en to the experience of all these
incumbents."
Senator Frederick Hilbert (R-
Wayland) also spoke in opposition
to the Morris Plan. He contended
that if the Senate adopted/ it, it
would be "creating another Frank-
enstein like we've already got."
Speaker of the House Don R.
Pears (-Buchanan) said after
the hearing that in his opinionp
there is very little likelihood that
the so-called "Morris plan" would
meet with favorable action.in the
House.
Senators who opposed the Morris
Plan indicated they would con-
tinue to fight it on the floor, but
they indicated they were most
hopeful it would become side-
tracked in the House.

CONGRESSIONAL REAPPORTIONMENT-Daily Night Editor
Michael Harrah, objecting to the Morris Plan, testified before
the Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday and presented an
alternate solution for redistributing the state's 19 congressional
districts.
SLIGHT INCREASE:
Swainson Recommends
$3.9 Million U' Budget

"STUDENTS"
T.V. won't work? Hi-Fi won't work
or radio? See us first for
EXPERT REPAIR SERVICE!
We also buy, rent, and sell bikes
pTop dollar for your bike!

By MICHAEL HARRAH
Special To The Daily
LANSING-Rep. Gilbert Wales
(D-Stambaugh) Monday indig-
nantly disowned on the floor of
the House, the remarks GOP
gubernatorial possibility George
Romney made on a national tele-
cast Sunday.
Wales said that Romney dis-
credited and disgraced Michigan
in the eyes of the nation.
"I don't think there is any-
thing, anything at all in this whole
United States of America that can
make Michigan big for trying to
defeat Gov. (John B.) Swainson,"
he charged.
Disputes Claims
"I don't like to have the people
of the (nation) claiming that we
are a welfare state; I don't think
that is absolutely true; I think
there are other states that are
involved also.'
"I don't think we have to have
any one individual from Michigan
or any other state stand before
a national audience and say that
'Michigan is decrepit.'
"I think we are deserving of an
apology, and we should be at the
same time afforden the opportu-
nity to offer this apology to the
whole nation."

GOP Caucus Leader
Newton (R-Delton) and
Floor Leader Allison Gn
Kingston) objected to W.
marks, implying they w
politically motivated.
Speaker of the House
Pears (R-Buchanan) re
Rep. Russell Strange (1
for the purpose of obje
Wales' remarks about t2
defeat Swainson, but Wale
listening.
Iranian Stude
March in Lan
A group of thirty Iran
dents from the Univers
Michigan State University
ed around the MSU can
cently to protest the rece
ing of the University of J
The marchers said that
not recognize the present
government and they carr:
ards calling for the releas
students arrested in anti
ment demonstrations in ]
month.
They were also protesti
they called the suppression
speech and academic free

--- i

(Continued from Page 1)

they will have available for ex-
pansi n. They'll be able to plan
accordingly," Morris points: out.
The Swainson building program
has been introduced by Senators
Garland Lane (D-Flint) and Philip
Rahoi (D-Iron Mountain). It calls
for $24.3 million in construction
funds.
Among the projects specifically
spelled out are $2.7 million for
IST, $10,000 for a study of 'an ad-
dition to the Medical Science Bldg.
and $350,000 for renovation of the
Medical Center.
Sen. Stanley G. Thayer (R-Ann
Arbor) and Bursley have introduc-
ed bills in their respective houses
for construction of a new music
school at the University. Thayer's
bill would provide $4.6 million;
Bursley's would allot $4.4 million.
Music School
Thayer called' the present music
school facilities "shamefully in-
adequate," and added that it had
been the University's number one
priority for the last eight years.
The building would be construct-
ed on North Campus.
Bursley has also introduced a
bill which would authorize the ex-
penditure of $1.5 million for the
construction of a central heating;
plant.
Both projects would be a part;
of the governor's overall capital
outlay program for higher educa-
tion, which would be supervised
by a state building authority.
Another measure being spon-
sored by Bursley would provide
$500,000 for basic research at five
of the state's colleges and univer-
sities.
He said that it would "help
Michigan's public image if the1
public knows state government so
fully supports research."
Enactment of the proposals2
would allot $200,000 for the Uni-
versity, with half of that ear-I
marked for IST and $50,000 each
for the Memorial Phoenix Proj-
ect and the Institute for Sociali
Research.j
Also in the research and capi-4

tal outlay areas, the governor pro-;
posed in his budget funds to in-
crease staffs and improve spe-m
cial programs for children in hos-
pitals and establishment of a day
school program at the University's
Children's Hospital.
Mental Health
He also asked research activi-
ties in mental health at the Uni-
versity.
Rep. Lester J. Allen (R-Ithaca)
has presented a bill which would
require college students to sign
promissory notes for $1,200-$1,500,
as a means of providing some $25
million annually for state sup-
ported colleges and universities.
Under the proposal, students
would pay off the notes at four
per cent interest over a 12-15
year period following graduation,
and payments would go into a re-
volving fund for future construc-
tion.
Allen called the plan "a sort of
compulsory alumni support," and
said that he was "of the opinion
that students should pay more for
their education, but tuitions are
high enough.
"This plan would be sort of a
deferred tuition."
Although legislators are gener-
ally optimistic about increasing
education allotments, Sen. Elmer
R. Porter (R-Blissfield) says that
"educators are going to be quizzed
more than ever this year. They're-
going to have to justify what
they're doing and what they want.
GOP House Caucus Leader Car-
roll Newton (R-Delton) noted that
Republicans generally favor more
money for education, however.
University President H a r 1 a n
Hatcher noted that the governor's
budget proposals "would be of
great help-but still would leave,
the University with some very
big problems."
He said it would need be suf-
ficient to meet present salary
needs. He added that the Univer-
sity definitely needs itore faculty
members, since the size of the
faculty "is decreasing as the stu-
dent body increases."

UNIVERSITY BIKE
211 So. State,

SH
662-

V - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- pig v q v 9 q v

rOME

(0)

C H IJiRH

ON

'hr

r 3AB BAT

In the fiscal year 1961 the Uni-
versity again topped the list of
Defense Department prime con-
tract recipients among educational
institutions' which do not operate
federal facilities.
The University, according to a
recent Defense Department an-
nouncement, received $12.920 mil-
lion from 314 prime contracts,
each the responsibility of a faculty
member. This is $1.230 million
more' than it received for defense
related 'research in the 1960 fiscal
year.
During the year 820 undergrad-
uate and 1,301 graduate students
particpiated in the University's
sponsored research projects. Three
hundred and eighteen doctoral'
candidates used project work in
the preparation of their theses. In
addition 401 faculty members par-
ticipated in sponsored research
during the academic year, as did.
463 during the summer.
Again last year the University,
ranked among the highest ten
per cent of all recipients of DOD
prime contracts.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Open House, 802 Monroe.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmondy 3-2969
William S. Baker, Minister
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
Sponsored by the Christion Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2=2756.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Conterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer. Rev. Franklin
Bennett.
....,,. %A

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe.
THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR AND THE
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw
Sunday:
9:00 and 10:30 Services-Rev. Jack Barck-
ardt..
CAMPUS CENTER
SUNDAY'
11:30 Coffee Hour at the Campus Center
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E: Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "The Sermon on
The Mount," Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Fred E.
Luchs.
Church School, crib-12th grade, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron-NO 3J9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class, Coffee
Hour
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
6:00 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship, Supper
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
Notional Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S, Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder,.Pastor
Miss Anna Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY
9:30 Worship Services and Holy Communion
9:45 Bible Study
1 14:00 Wrship Service
7:00 Lutheran Student Association Meeting-
Ross Pearson on South America

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday services at 9:45and11:45. Sermon by
the Pastor, "A MOUNTAIN-TOP EXPERI-
ENCE"
Sunday at 6:00: Gammo Delta, Lutheran Stu
dent Club, supper-program,
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Gaede
The sermon topic for Sunday, Feb. 11, "The
Aloneness of Man." Sermon based on
Camus' The Stranger.
Adult Discussion Group at 10:00, Dr. Williar
Pierce, "Taxation and The Constitutiona
Convention."
Church School at 10:30.
Church Service at 11:00.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
FEBRUARY 11, 1962
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship. Series
A More Excellent Way, THE WAY OF UN.
DERSTANDING. Sermon by Dr. Rupert. The
Service is broadcast at. 11:15 a.m. or
station WOIA.
6:45 p.m. A group will leave to attend the
Oratorio KING DAVID, given by the Anr
Arbor Cantata Singers at St.' Andrew's
Episcopal Church.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 p.m. Holy Communion, Chapel, followec
by breakfast in the Pine Room. Out in time
for 8 a.m. classes.
4-5 p.m. Midweek Refresher
FRIDAY
5:30 p.m. Wesley Grads meet for supper in the
Pine Room. Jean Robe will speack and show
slides about Pakistan and the life of the
Church there. Call NO 8-6881 by Thursday
evening for reservations,
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m., 12:00
Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 9:00 a.m., 12:00
Noon, 5:10 p.m.
Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 a.m. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evening 7:30 p.m.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 p.m.

r

The New York 'imes
It is the wise owl that reads

I

The Times. Delivered to the
Dorms every morning of the
week.

::5.7$; .,

SPECIAL
STUDENT RATES

Mail subscriptions accepted
at the same low prices.

DAILY

u _ I

$6.40
$6.80

HI-Ft STUDIO.
Largest Inventory of High Fidelity Components In The Area

SUNDAY

Daily and Sunday $13.00

N

WE STOCK
90REK-O-KUT

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENKTIST

" KLH

0 BELL

I

sII

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan