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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 20, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESE

'ERSITY SENIORS: '
Class To Leave IST Publishing Fund

By JUDITH OPPENIEIM
e class of '62 is beginning a
tradition with its gift to the
ersity.
stead of a "tangible" present
as a statue or fountain,
or Class President Roger Pas-
said the class will leave the
tute of Science and Tech-
;y a starting contribution for
blishing fund which will pay
rinting books based on lec-
series the IST sponsors during
year,
ie first such book was edited
?rof. William Liller, now at
'ard. It was entitled "Space
>physics," based on the corn-
ion of notes from top scholars
e field who had lectured here
ie invitation of the IST.
To Publish Books
of. John M. Allen of the zoo-
department edited the second
"The Nature of Biological
rsity," and the third, entitled
lecular Control of Cellular
rity" is now at press.
r Administrative Assistant
ard S. Webster explained that
osals for 'the lecture series
nate with a faculty member
is later given time off to col-
and edit the notes.
Ier the special publishing fund
t up, royalties from the books
provide continuing revenue to'
both publishing costs and
les of professors released from
teaching obligations to edit
books.
Extra Funds
ebster said he hopes it will be
ble for IST to sponsor one
re series each year. Feasibility
depend upon willingness of
r sources to supplement funds
.ded by-the senior class.
nior Board Vice - President
Lurie explained the money
C To Present
search Forum
forum of five speakers will
iss the, question of sponsored
rch in. graduate education at
1. today in the Rackham Aud.
discussion, entitled "Is the
ey Worth the Price?" is spon-
i by the Graduate Student
Loll
tnnon To View
ationa1 Intellect'

(4l _

the class will be able to donate
will not be sufficient to cover the
publishing costs for a book. How-
ever the gift will provide a foun-
dation. Coming entirely from vol-
untary senior dues, the senior
treasury now has approximately,
$2000. Necessary added money will
be provided by the IST.

Although the senior class will
be mentioned on the title page of
the first book published with
money from the new fund, Lurie
stressed the long range aspects of
this type of gift and hoped other
classes and schools will follow the
example of giving gifts with an
academic value.'

Local Delegate Says Con-Con
At '.Interesting, crucial Point'
By J AME IWQ TUTOLS

_. _ i},y ! tilY.Li'a 3 1 I Al. tL1lIL 1.

Michigan's constitutional con-
vention has reached "a very in-
teresting and somewhat crucial
point," Con-Con delegate James
K. Pollock (R-Ann Arbor) said
at a luncheon meeting yesterday,
in the Union's Anderson Room.
Pollock, chairman of the Com-
mittee on Rights, Suffrage and
Elections, is former head of the
University's political science de-
partment.
Preliminary consideration of the
constitution is almost complete,
and the specialized committees
have given their recommendations
to the convention, Pollock explain-
ed. The convention is now enter-
ing a "more responsible stage,"
in which action taken will be final
and the votes of individual dele-
gates will be recorded, he said.
Views Achievements
Pollock praised some of Con-
Con's actions and criticized others.
He said the convention's score was
"positive," but expressed disap-
pointment at some "negative ac-
tions." He praised the "civic-
mindedness" of the citizens of
Michigan which made the con-
vention possible.
"There aren't very many states
in the Union where we could get
that kind of response," he noted.
Pollock saw "no cause to be
worried or alarmed" about the Late
of the Education Committee's re-
port to the convention. "I doubt
if. it will, occasion much opposi-
tion," he predicted.
Critical of Certain Action
He criticized the Committee on
Finance. and Taxation which, he
said, "has not always looked for-
ward," but praised it for pro-
viding "a necessary new ceiling on
state borrowing." The action of
the 'Legislative Committee allow-
ing more autonomy for county
governments is "a real compromise
which represents a considerable,
advance," he explained.
Pollock was critical of the "ear-
I Wedlock

I

iuart L. Hannon, assistant to
president of the Free Europe
imittee, will discuss "The Na-
al Intellect" at 3 p.m. today
,he Rackham Amph.
he committee, which is spon-
d by the Crusade for Freedom,
ots Radio Free Europe. The.
gram is sponsored by the jour-
ism department.
0IAL2-6264
* ENDING WEDNESDAY
EXPLO E E
COMEDY

r
t

marking" provision which has ten-
tatively been continued in the new
constitution. He claimed that re-1
serving state funds for special
purposes "places very binding re-1
strictions on the Legislature." The
Committee on Finance and Taxa-
tion "has not faced up to its re-3
sponsibilities" on this question, he
said.
Pollock reserved his strongest
criticism for the Committee on;
Legislative Organization, which is
in charge of legislative reappor-
tionment. "The (apportionment),
proposal is not at all satisfactory
to me,"'he said. "It is worse than
what we have right now." He
urged that "civic-minded pressure
should be brought to bear", on the
delegates to influence the appor-
tionment question.
-Criticizes Adjournment Date
He- was also very critical of the
state attorney general, who has
said that Con-Con must adjourn
by Aptil 1 or else the new con-
stitution will not be 'considered
on the. November ballot.(
"I have no respect 'for this
opinion at all," Pollock said. The
delegates have been under "tre-.
mendous pressure" because of the
deadline, and many now regard
it as impractical.
"We can do as w please," Pol-
lock said about adjournment, "and
it is the duty of the Legislature
to provide for us."
Texas Regents
Approve Plan
Of Selection
AUSTINN-The Board of Regents
of the. University of Texas early
this month approved an admin-
istrative recommendation that the
editor of the campus paper, the
"Daily Texan," be appointed by
the Board of Directors of Texas
Student Publications.'
At the present time, the editors
of the "Texan," the "Cactus," and
the "Texas Ranger," other univer-
sity publications, are elected in a
spring. general election. The rec-
ommendation does not include the
editors of the "Cactus" and the
Three committees were request-
ed to study the requirementssfor
editors and a possible increase in
salaries to help produce a better
paper.
Hoyt Purvis, the present "Texan"
editor, voiced disapproval of the
recommendation and said that he
"is bitter about the influence that
Texas newspapers and publishers
evidently had in bringing about
the change in editorial selection."
CHAPEL HILL -- Men's Honor
Council Chairman George Camp-
bell aired student complaints that
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs
William G. Long, of 'the Univer-
sity of North Carolina,. has used
"third degree" tactics in question-
ing defendants charged with hon-
or infractions.
"' haven't been aware of any
such, practices being used," Dean
Long said' Thursday.
Maces To Discuss
Dating, Marriage
Mr. and Mrs. Daid Mace, exe-
cutive directors of the American
Association. of Marriage Counsel-
ors, will lead discussions on in-
ternational dating, courtship and
marriage Friday and Saturday in
Waled Lake.
Miss Harriet Cady of the Inter-
national Center said the deadline
for registration for the retreat is
5 p.m. Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Mace, founders of
the Marriage Guidance Council in

Britain, will also give lectures on
campus Thursday and Friday.

'U'To Begin
New Project
In Housing
The proposed Washtenaw Ter-
race Apartments will be built as
housekeeping units for single grad-
uate students and will be con-
structed on three University-own-
ed lots, Wilbur K. Pierpont, vice-
president in charge of business and
finance, said yesterday.
Pierpont said that two of the
lots face on Washtenaw between
Wilmot and Forest Sts. and the
third faces entirely on Wilmot.
Two houses on the property have
been razed already and the re-
naining two will be torn down in
the near future, he added.
Pierpont said that although the
exact plans for the apartments are
not yet known, they will meet
area zoning and parking require-'
ments.
The Regents announced at their
meeting Friday that Meathe, Kess-
ler and Associates, a Detroit ar-
chitectural firm, has met with a
planning committee to study pro-
posals for the structure or struc-
tures. University officials have al-
so consulted with students for
ideas about the apartments.
Pierpont added that the Univer-
sity has owned the property on
which the proposed apartment
buildings are to be constructed for
some length of time.
Seminar Set
On UN College
Americans Committed to World
Responsibility will hold the fifth
session of the seminar on the
United Nations University, the
"College of Arts and Sciences,"' at
7:30 p.m. today in Room 3N of
the, Michigan Union.
Participants in the discussion
will be James H. Robertson, as-
sociate dean of the literary col-
lege, Prof. Arnold S. Kaufman, of
the philosophydepartment, and
Fven Lundstedt, assistant director
for the Foundation for Research
on Human Behavior.

A living testimonial to the valid-
ity of the statement that one is
only as old as one feels, Arthur
Fiedler, conductor of the Boston
Pops Orchestra, performed in
Ann Arbor Sunday.
Fiedler's musical interests ex-
tend to works of the contemporary
era. This was shown by his in-
clusion in the program of the sec-
ond piano concerto by Dmitri Kab-
alevsky, as well as selections by
Bernstein a n d Khachaturian.
However, Fiedler noted that he
"doesn't understand" electronic
music.
On the subject of the dance
called the twist, Fiedler said that
he has seen m u s i c progress
through such dance forms as the
Black Bottom and the Big Apple,
which were also considered im-
moral by parents in their own
tibe. Thus it is understandable
that the twist is considered con-
troversial today when viewed in
this light, he added. Young people

should expose themselves to such
things, he commented.
"They won't be playing rock 'n
roll records for the rest of their
lives anyway, unless they're com-
plete idiots," Fiedler said.
Of the encores for which Bos-
ton Pops concerts are famous,
Fiedler explained that they are
not "spontaneous" selections, but
are decided upon ahead of time.
This is necessary because the Bos-
ton Pops has amassed a repertory
of some 400-500 "encores."
To Hold Lecture
On Philosophy
Prof. William Frankena of the
philosophy department will lead a
Challenge seminar on "Philoso-
phies of Higher' Education" at 7:30
p.m. today in the Honors Lounge
of the Undergraduate Library.

Fiedler Reviews Interests
In Modern Music, Dancing

Box office open Feb. 19-23 from 1 0-3-Tickets at door
Tickets $3.75, 2.50, 1.75, 1.25
Sponsored by the Cercle Francais

FOLK

LE TRETEAU DE PARIS
presents
huis-elos (No exit) by SARTRE
la cautatrice ehauve by IONESCO
Friday, Feb. 23 ...8:00 P.M.
at the LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

All Folk LP's
30 to 4 0% oi

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DIAL
NO 8-6416

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SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

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ENDING TONIGHT
PETER
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IN
The Man Who
Wagged His Tail

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The extraordinary almost oc-
curred at Friday's Regents
meeting: a faculty resignation
just missed rejection.
University Executive Vice-
President Marvin L. Niehuss,
presenting recommendations for
appointments, approvals and
resignations, of, faculty mem-
bers, told the _ Regents Prof.
Frances Greer of the music
school was forced to quit her
teaching post for , . . (pause)
"personal reasons.
But a blush on the face of
Regent Frederick (Battle Chas-
er) Matthaei, '23, betrayed the
story behind Niehuss' quip. Miss
Greer, a former Metropolitan
Opera singer, and Matthael had
just completed a two week
honeymoon in the Bahamas.
Matthael, whose 'contribu-
tions to the University earned
him the Michigaumia. title of
'Battle :Chaser' asked 'that the
Regents refuse to accept Prof.
Greer's resignation.
Matthaei-who presented the
University with his 464 acre
Radrick Farms estate in De-
cember-confessed, "I expect
her job to be her meal ticket."

eeiv'4Center'

(in the Hi Fi'
304 S. Thayer St.

TV Center)
NO 5-4855

I

... .

--AI

;4m

NEWMAN,
C*LU B
General Meeting
Fri., Feb. 23--7:30 P.M.
Followed at 8:30 by a special dance
featuring the
ROAD RUNNERS

PETITIONING

OPEN.

t

for all Panhellenic
Executve Council

plositions:

ANN ARBOR CIVIC BALLET PRESENTS
CQ IIPAVYOP 70 5!J'77 V OVCA S77I

members free

non-members and guests $.50

331 Thompson
ALL WELCOME!

February 20-23
POSITIONS OPEN:,
President
Executive Vice President
Admininstrative Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Chairman of PublicrRelations
Chairman of Scholarship:-
Chairman of Rushing Chairmen
r{ M:...f.., ~E D.el~inn . c mnng

-I

AT
knn Arbor High-2 Performances
riday, March 9-8:30 P.M.
WAN. LAKE. (Second Act) . .. Music: Tschaikowsky; Choreography:
eorge Balanchine. ORIGINAL SIN . .: Music: John Lewis; Choreog-
phy: Lew Christensen. SYMPHONY IN C: Music. Georges Bizet;
horeography: George Bolanchine: Tickets: Main Floor $3.50-$2.50.
:lcony $3.50-$2.50-$1.50. All seats reserved.

the annual development council concert
features
LAMBERT, HENDRICKS & ROSS

Winners of both "Playboy" and "Downbeat"
i zz nOIIs for best i azzvocal*.roup.

I

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II

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