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May 29, 1962 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-29

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, MAY 29,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

isar_1

MAY 2, 192 TH MTCTGANBA__

PAGE NI~

The, WihnfeI' Cince
By MIKE BURNS
The rit of Michigan
T SEEMS LIKE ONLY LAST WEEK that I took my first long walk
down to the huge Michigan Stadium and gaped at its seemingly end-
ss mouth, filled with ant-like people scrambling for their seats. That
as my introduction to Michigan athletics as a student.
Four short years have passed since then. They haven't been par-
cularly significant in terms of historical Michigan standards. The
inds of fate blew both kind and cruel: Wolverines won more than
eir share of Big Ten titles and produced some pretty memorable
ioments, pleasant and tragic, for those who have actively and anx-
usly- followed Michigan sports these past four years.
Though the stars of today may not shine so bright and their
glories fade in the distant future, I shall still recall with a par-
ticular vividness the athletic contests and athletes I have seen
and known, for they characterize Michigan in a way no other
aspect of campus life can match.
In the welter of the academic world, athletics may seem like a
ther unimportant and peripheral facet of the University. But when
ostiof us look back on college days at Michigan, athletics are sure to
and out as a vital and memorable part of the total experience of
[ichigan life.
Like the weather, sports is a universal topic of interest and con-
3rsation but, unlike the weather, people quite naturally identify them-
ives with their teams. So it is through the accomplishments of
'olverine teams that Michigan alumni all over the world are able to
ep in touch most vividly with their alma mater. And that identifi-
tion is just as strong and as significant for undergrads who flock to
:ichilgan sports events.
It is not always the winning record which is important: it is
the pride of association, a living symbol of loyalty, a somewhat
constant representation of the University and all it stands for.
And that is why thousands of alumni return to Ann Arbor every
fall to watch Michigan in action on the gridiron, though most of
the athletic contemporaries of these alumni have passed into
oblivion.
I have sensed this feeling of attachment for Michigan's athletic
ams and have felt a certain pride of association that I do not think
ill fade with graduation. As I look back, a number of incidents and
.dividuals clearly come to mind. Strangely enough, not all of them
re particularly pleasant for,.like life itself, the good and the bad
e equally as impressive.
emorable Moments ...
ME 1958 FOOTBALL GAME with Michigan State was an example.
After fighting to a 12-0 halftime edge, the Wolverines were forced
settle for a 12-12 tie in the last minutes of the game. You could
nse the dejection of the Michigan rooters at losing sweet victory in
e final minutes but there was'also a feeling of moral victory for
elg the nationally-ranked Spartans. It was a brutal and rugged
ime for both sides, as witnessed by the fact that neither team was
16 to :play that quality of ball the rest of the year . . . The next
ar it was a well-deserved triumph over Ohio State by a 23-14 margin
tat snt Wolverine fans wild with glee and proved once again that
e best victories are those over traditional rivals . . . Probably the
rkest day I can recall occurred this fall at Minneapolis. All through
e second half Minnesota was challenging Michigan's early lead and
sattack seeme dto gain momentum. When Michigan held the Goph-
s for four downs on the Wolverine nine-yard line with only three
mnutes remaining, it looked like Michigan would salvage the fierce-
ught contest. But a tragic Wolverine fumble on the Michigan five
ith about two minutes left was recovered by the hosts and sitting
the press box, I could feel the impending doom, as Michigan lost
the final minute 23-20.
A last-minute victory that meant a lot to Michigan came in
the gymnastics meet with Illinois In 1959. The I-M Gym was
crowded to the rafters, and the evening produced one of the finest
dual meets over seen in the Big Ten. It had been a truly cham-
pionship meet with the Ilini's Abe Grossfeld winning three events
himself, while Michigan's steady team balance left them only two
pointi behind going into the final event, tumbling. Wolverine Jim
Brown set the pace and it was up to Illinois's Allan Harvey to
beat him and gain the tie. Harvey missed by a slim 277-274 mar-
gin and that meant victory over the eight-time Big Ten cham-
pion Illinois squad. Gym meets don't usually provide that much
excitement, but that one proved to be one of the most electric
athletic contests I have seen.
Michigan's swimmers have won a number of NCAA and Big Ten
.ampionships but perhaps the most stirring occurred last year when
ey upset Southern Cal, the team that had dethroned the Wolverines
1960. Fighting the odds, Michigan regained the crown,,.walloping
ghly-favored USC 85-62 in one of the biggest upsets the Wolverines
er pulled. Waiting for the results to come over the wire from Seattle,
e margin kept mounting and the sense of pride grew. Although there
re few Michigan fans watching in person, that swimming meet
owed but another example of Michigan rising to meet the challenge
id conquering.
rowth and Change.. .
ND THERE ARE a number of things that you'd like to see changed.

Lixe the present system of athletic financing, a system that pro-
ote5 independence for the athletic department but which is now
iding up the physical expansion program which Michigan desperate-
needs . . . Like the closed Board in Control of Intercollegiate Ath-
ics' meetings. This practice of closed meetings has persisted despite
e fact that the Regents, Residence Hall Board of Governors and
e Union Board have all opened their doors to Daily reporters. It is
other unfortunate manifestation of the "independence" of the
hletic Department
I leave my job as sports editor with a sense of pride in having
en associated with the many Michigan men who have done their
st on the fields of athletic combat for the Maize and Blue, but also
th a tear of regret at having to sever this active association. Paul
llico, in his "Farewell to Sport," summed it up the way I'd like to
d this column:
Sportswriting has been an old and good friend and companion
to me. One does not, it seems, barge ruthlessly out of such a friend-
ship. Rather one lingers a little over the goodbye, sometimes even
a little reluctant to leave, and uncertain, turning back as some
old, well-loved incident is remembered, calling up again, the pic-
tunre of vanished friends, having one's last say, lingering; as long
as one dares before that final, irrevocable shutting of the door.

HIGH JUMPER COMES BACK:
Williams Finds Angle to Success

By DAVE GOOD
It was the Monday before the
Big, Ten track meet and Steve
Williams was desperate.
The senior Michigan high-
jumper, who had bordered on
greatness two years before by up-
ending Indiana's Reggie Sheppard
for the outdoor conference cham-
pionship, now had to face the grim

next day I did 6'8, so I decided to
stay with it. It was the first change
I'd made since I was a sophomore
in high school."
Later in the week Williams, who
has always used the straddle style,
cleared 6'9%/2" and thought he
stood a good chance to show that
he had regained his sophomore
form in Saturday's Big Ten meet.
And after the jumpers got past
6'S" Williams and Miller were the
only two left.
They both made 6'7" easily, but
when Miller cleared 6'7%/4" the
burden was on Williams. It was
1/" higher than his winning mark
as a sophomore and he couldn't
quite make it.
Should Have Won
"I think that jump at 6'7" was
the best I ever made," Williams
remarked. "I should have beat him
and beat him bad. But I started
hurrying."
Coach Don Canham added, "He
jumped real well. If he'd had a
little break he'd have made it. He's
a good competitor and he always
has been."
Just clearing the 6'7" in a meet
proved that he was at least as
good as he was as a soph, but in
all this talk about his first season
and his third, there seems to be
one whole year missing.
And there is.
Misses Season
Williams, it seems, lost out his
entire junior year because of in-
eligibility, and it is this little mis-
fortune which both Canham and
Williams think cost him a chance
to become a nationally known
jumper.
"It hurt him a lot," pointed out
Canham. "I think he'd have been
one of the real good ones if it
hadn't been for that."
Williams added, "I think I'd
be jumping 7' right now. I .didn't
high jump for a year, and that
hurts you just like a layoff from
anything else."
Just last week Williams got into
the stratosphere with a practice
jump of 6'10", but the skinny 6'6",
172 lb.) Boyne City product isn't
very optimistic about winning next
month's NCAA jump with men like
Boston College's John Thomas and.
San Antonio JC's Joe Foust, both
Olympians, in the running.
Williams thinks he might not

T Iennis 'T eamn
Sends Three
To NCAA
By GEORGE WHITE
June will see the graduation of
half of the netmen who brought
Coach Bill Murphy an unmarred
season and his fourth Big Ten
Tennis Championship in as many
years-Gerry Dubie, Jim Tenney
and Tom Beach.
Coach Murphy will send Dubie
and Tenney along ,with Ray Sen-
kowski and Harry Facquier to the
NCAA Tennis Tournament this
summer representing the Maize
and Blue.
Dubie and Tenney finished the
season with perfect records while
Beach dropped a loner to Purdue's
Bill Hannas early in the season.
Dubie and Tenney went on in the
Big Ten Championship to cinch
two and three singles, teaming up
to win two doubles, while the
Beach-Ron Linclau duo romped
to victory taking the number three
doubles crown.
No Defeats
The season saw Michigan take
victory after victory in solid fash-
ion against the best in the Mid-
west; blanking three teams, Ohio
Wesleyan, Detroit and Indiana.
The Wolverines swept three others
in 8-1 fashion, Illinois, Wisconsin
and Michigan State.
Coach Murphy will undoubtedly
look to this year's strong freshman
squad to fill out next spring's ros-
ter. Hal Lowe, Illinois Men's
Tournament Champ and Grosse
Pointe's George Russell sseem most
likely to fill in for the graduating
seniors. Lowe came to Michigan as
the Arizona high school champion.

I

11

Oxforb C1uU
TRADITIONAL
SPORTS HIRTS

STRADDLE STRATEGY-High-jumper Steve Williams says you
don't have to work as hard using the straddle style as with the
older western roll technique. But he adds that there is a tendency
to lean into the bar too soon, which is difficult to correct.

jilts 4i

Sale It&

12a 4

STEVE WILLIAMS
... back in groove

possibility that he had lost what-
ever it was that had made him a
winner.
He had jumped only 6'5" in his
last two outings, once beating Big
Ten indoor champion Connie Mil-
ler, but that was when Miller was
just rounding into form after pull-
ing a muscle. Williams knew he'd
have to go higher to whip the In-
diana sophomore again.
"I was jumping rotten," com-
mented Williams. "I had to do
something.
Tries New Angle
"So just by accident I decided
to try approaching the bar at a
sharper angle. I'd been jumping
at a 60-degree angle to the bar,
and my approach is pretty fast so
that I sort of glide and sometimes
almost run right through the bar.
I tried changing it to 30 degrees
and this way I found I had more
time on top of the bar.
"That night I did 6'1" and the

get to join the select 7' club unless
he goes into the service after he
graduates. "If I want to continue
high jumping, that's the best way.
to do it," he noted.
"That's what Russia's world rec-
ord-holder Valerei Brumel does.
He's jumping five or six hours a
day, but I wouldn't do that much."
Elect Aquino
Track Captain
Charlie Aquino, a junior from
Norwalk, Conn., was selected by
his teammates over the weekend
to captain Michigan's trackmen
next year.
Aquino will succeed senior Ergas
Leps, from Toronto, in this capa-
city. A virtual unknown last year,
Aquino won Big Ten champion-
ships in the indoor 1000-yd. run
and outdoor 660-yd. run and set
varsity records in both. He also ran
440 and 880 legs on Michigan's
mile and two-mile relay teams.
He's the one whom Coach Don
Canham is counting on to take
over for Leps in the middle dis-

Then he put in, "If I lifted
weights I think I could add two
or three inches to what I can do
now. When I get up high I know
I'm just not powerful enough."
Right now, however, Williams
has no future visions of grandeur.
He says he'd just be content to
beat Western Michigan's Jim Oli-
phant and All Littlejohn in the
Michigan Open at Kalamazoo this
Wednesday.
"Oliphant is a funny jumper,"
Williams remarked. "Sometimes he
does 6'8" and sometimes he does
6'2". Littlejohn is more consistent.
I sure hope I can beat them."

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Children's Summer Theater'
Applications now being received for the 1962 season
of HOMESTEAD ACRES THEATER DAY CAMP
for boys and girls 9 to 17 years of age.
CAMP VISITATION DAILY 4 to 8 P.M.
Call GR 9-4161 for information and brochure

Sa//e/'t

AU64

State Street
See our Nightly Floor Display

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

New York
Cleveland
x-Minnesota
Detroit
x-Los Angeles
Baltimore
Chicago
Kansas City
x-Boston
x-Washington

w
24
24
26
21
21
21
22
20
16
11

L
16
16
18
18
19
20
22
25
24
28

Pet.
.622
.62i
.591
.539
.525
.512
.500
.444
.400
.282

GB
2%
3112
4
6%
8
12

San Francisco
Los Angeles
Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Houston
Philadelphia
Chicago
New York

w
33
31
25
24
23
19
17
16
15
12

L
14
15
16
18
18
25
27
26
29
27

Pct.
.702
.674
.610
.571
.561
.432
.386
.381
.341
.308

GB
5
6Y2
7
12%
14
14/2
16Y
17

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 5, Baltimore 0
Chicago 2, Cleveland 0
New York at Kansas City (rain)
Boston at Minnesota (inc.)
Washington at Los Angeles (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at Los Angeles
New York at Kansas City
Boston at Minneapolis
Baltimore at Detroit
(Only games scheduled)

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 2, Milwaukee 1
Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 1 (n)
Cincinnati 9, Houston 6 (n)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Milwaukee at Chicago
St. Louis at Pittsburgh (n)
(Only games scheduled)

V

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