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May 27, 1962 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-27

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AY, MAX 27, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE S

~Y, MY 27 196 TIN MICIG-N-AIL

iamondmen

Sweep

Doubleheader

from

Broncos

ree, Straight Over Western; Kerr, Roebuck Sparkle

GROSSE POINTE, MUSKEGON HEIGHTS:
Two Tie in State Track Meet

(4>

(Continued from Page 1)

next man, also stole third. Dave
Post then hit a long fly to left and
Merullo tagged up and came in for
Michigan's first run of.the after-
noon, tying the score.
The Wolverines took; control in
the sixth by exploding for five big
runs. Shortstop Jim Newman was
hit in the foot to start it off. Har-
vey Chapman sacrificed him to
second. After Steckley flied out,
Spalla walked. Newman and
Spalla then advanced on a wild
pitch. Catcher Merullo came up
again and laced a double into cen-
terfield scoring both runners and
putting Michigan out in front.
Although two were out the inn-
ing was far from over. First-base-
man Dave Campbell walked. Then
Post drilled a single down the third
base line to score Merullo with
Campbell taking third. Pitcher
Final
Big Ten Standings

Roebuck singled Campbell home
for the final run of the game.
On the mound Roebuck hand-
cuffed the Broncos the rest of the
way to register his eighth victory
against only two losses to conclude
the season as the team's leading
winner.
Hurlers Clash
The second game developed into
quite a pitcher's duel. Western ace
Bill Ortleib, who hadn't lost a reg-
ular season game in three years
on the mound for the Broncos, re-
tired the first nine batters who
faced him. Kerr also was in top
form, setting the Broncos down
consistently, with only a few stray
runners reaching first base in the
early innings.
That tenth batter proved to be a
tough one for Ortleib. He was Joe
Jones, who drilled a leadoff dou-
ble to left at the start of the fourth
inning. Jim Newman then took a
called third strike for the first out.
Chapman kept it alive with a
single past third with Jones tak-
ing third and Chapman moving to
second on the throw to the plate.
Steckley's slow bouncer to third
brought home the run as the third
baseman threw high to the plate
allowing Jones to slide in under
the throw, and score what proved
to be the game's winning run.
The Broncos stamped their
hoofs menacingly after two were
out in the fifth inning. Third base-
man Dan Predovic walked and Al
Drews moved him to second with
a single through the box. Michi-

«,

By GEORGE WHITE
Lots of things happened in yes-
terday's State Track Meet that
have happened in past meets:
little guys beat big guys, near-
winners slipped at the finish line,
batons got dropped, bars jiggled,
then fell on record tries, and a
single man's pulled muscle his
high school's chances for win-
ning, but . . . never, not in the
55 years that the meet has been
held, have two teams tied for top
honors.
It all happened yesterday at
Ferry Field.
Few records fell in yesterday's
wet outing, but when all the cheer-
ing and shouting was over, Grosse
Pointe and Muskegon Heights
emerged with 30 points each to
share the state title. Flint North-
ern. finished third, garnering 27
points.
Just One First
The winners took only one first
between them, that of Muskegon
Heights' :10.0 clocking of Joe Par-
ham in the 100-yd. dash. Grosse

JOE MERULLO DICK POST
..-,.vet comes through ... has big day

Illinois
MICHIGAN.
Ohio State
Wisconsin
Indiana'
Michigan State
Northwestern
Iowa
Purdue
Minnesota

W
13
12
9
8
6
6
5
5
41
3

L
2
3
5
6
8
8
9
9
11
10

Pet.
.867
.800
.643
.571
.429
.429
.357
.357
.247
.231

GB
1
3%
4!
6j
61/z
7/
7 Y
9
9

gan's Joe Jones ended it by grab-
bing a bounder by Gatza and tag-
ging the bag to end the inning.
Do or Die
Western gave it a last fatal ef-
fort in the sixth. With two outs
Pat Bidelman, the second base-
man, walked. First baseman Bill
Ihney lined a single right down
the line near third, moving Bidel-
man to third and taking second on
the throw.
With the winning run on base
Kerr bore down and got the next
batter to bounce one back to the
mound for an easy out.
Pitching was the whole contest
until the last of the seventh. Just
when the fans were thinking that

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 4-1, Iowa 3-5 (1st game 11
- inn.)

NEW BIG TEN SPORT:
Judo's Popularity Increases

By PETE DiLORENZI
A man walks down the street.
loe is suddenly attacked by a
man 70 pounds heavier than him-
self, yet, by somehow grabbing and
twisting the aggressor's wrist, the
innocent man manages to send
him hurtling through the air,
evnetually to crash to earth and
lim away, muttering something
about how his opponent cheated
by using "judo" instead of fight-
ing fairly.
Judo No, Jiu Jitsu Si
The man did not use judo. Per-
has he used jiu-jitsu, or, had he
been trained in it, he might have
used karate, but, in all probabil-
ity, he did not use judo. For judo
is a sport, and, unlike either of the
other two suggested methods, is
not intended to be used for street
fighting or for self-defense.
And this year, it has gained
even wider 'recognition as a sport
by being included in the list of
cometitive events for the 1964
Olympic Games to be held at-
Tokyo.
As a result of this, a group of
Michigan, students and their "in-
structor", Peter Goebel, a Ger-
man-born student who has been
learning and practicing judo for
eight years, has banded together
for the purpose of first, learning
judo well enough to compete
against experienced foes, and sec-

two runs for the Broncos in their
last bats would win it, Michigan's
offense tore into the previously
invincible Ortleib in the top of
the seventh.
Tate walked to start the inning.
Merullo was then called out on
strikes. Campbell stepped up and
hit a two-and-one pitch deep to
left field. Outfielder Drews leaped
as high as he could but missed it.
It Didn't Count
With Campbell circling the
bases for a home run the Western
outfielder seemingly reached un-
der th fence and brought the ball
back into play. The umpire, who
was watching the proceedings
from first base, suddenly decided
to rule the hit as a triple, robbing
the Wolverine first baseman of his
circuit clout.
Despite the rounds of discussion
after this move, the Michigan
batsmen became even more ag-
gressive. Another single by Post,
this time a bounder to right,
scored Cambell, officially, and the
Wolverines went three runs in
front.
Pitcher Kerr was up next and
reached first safely on an error
by the second baseman with Tate
holding at second. Ortleib struck
out Jones, but shortstop Newman
singled Post home a few seconds
later with Kerr holding up at
third. Sophomore Chapman in-
flicted the final blow with a hard
hit single to center which scored
both Kerr and Newman to put the
game out of reach.
Kaline Hurt,
Sidelined for,
Two Months
NEW YORK 0P) - Al Kaline
sustained a broken collar bone yes-
terday while making a game-sav-
ing catch in Detroit's 2-1 victory
over New York and will be lost to
the Tigers for about two months.
The loss of the outfield star rep-
resents a-major blow to the Tigers'
chances of overhauling the Ameri-
can League leaders. Kaline was
hitting .345 with 38 runs batted in
and 13 home runs, second best in
the league, going into yesterday's
game.
Dr. Sidney Gaynor, Yankee phy-
sician who treated Kaline at a hos-
pital, said he sustained "a lontidu-
dinal fracture of the edge of the
right clavicle." He said the break
was at the point where the collar
bone joins the shoulder.
A cast was put on the shoulder
and Kaline hospitalized overnight.
A Detroit spokesman said the out-
fielder may return to Detroit to-
day.
HAIRSTYLING
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JOHN KERR
... still undefeated

Great Comeback
FIRST GAME
MICHIGAN AB R H RBI
Jones, 2b 5 0 0 0
Newman, ss 3 1 0 0
Chapman, 3b 2 0 1 0
Steckley, if 5 0 0 0
Spalla, cf 4 1 1 0
Merullo, c 4 2 2 2
Campbell, 1b 2 1 0 0
Post, rf 3 1 1 2
Roebuck, p 4 0 2 2
Totals 32 6 7 6

WESTERN MICHIGAN
Predovic, 3b
Drews, If
Gatza, cf
Michaiski, ss
Kwiatowski, rf
lBidelman, 2b
Ine, lb
Austry, c
a-Theder, c
Salo, p
Cooley, p
b-Keniston
Bitante

AB R H RBI
4 1 0 0
5 0 2 1
2 0 0 0
3 00
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
5 0 10
00 00

Pointe shared a first with Mum-!
ford in the 880-yd. run, George+
Thomas of G.P. and Ted Mc-
Burrows hitting- the wire together
at 1:57.9-only .7 second off the
state mark.
Flint Northern, on the other'
hand, walked off with three big
firsts and a third, but couldn't
place the men in the other events
to bring home an overall victory.
The deciding event for all three
schools was the last: the mile
Loken on TV
Newt Loken, Michigan's gym-
nastics coach, will be a featured
guest on ABC-TV's "Wide
World of Sports" program to-
day. The show can be seen on
Channel 7 at 5:00 p.m.
relay. Going into the mile even,
Northern and the Blue Devils 26
points each. About a hair behind
with 25 points was Muskegon
Heights.
Downpour
Twenty-five schools entered. As
the teams lined up for the first of
five heats, it became obvious that
the state mark of 3:26.1 was go-
ing to be difficult to break; rain
had fallen lightly in the early
part of the afternoon and now was
coming in a steady pour. Bloom-
field took the first heat with a
3:32.6. Thurston, who eventually
won the event, came closest to the
state record with a 3:28.1, edging
Detroit Easter in the last twenty
yards.
About this time, puddles formed
along the corners of the track.
Flint Northern grabbed the lead
early in the third heat and coasted

to a 3:31.2 win over rival Flint
Central. In the fourth heat, Grosse
Pointe traded the lead in a hard-
run contest with Ann Arbor, pull-
ing ahead on the last corner to
win with a 3:29.5. In the fifth
and final heat, Muskegon Heights
was faced with beating highly-
rated Mumford, who ran a 3:24.8
during the year, in order to tie
for first.
Detroit Northwestern jumped to
an early lead with Muskegon and
Mumford trailing by yards. On the
third 440 leg, Muskegon surged
forward, fought off a last-second
effort by Mumford, to finish third
overall with a 3:28.7.
Perhaps the finest performance
of the day came from dimunitive
Louis Scott of Detroit Eastern in
the one-mile run. Scott, only 5'6"
and 1272 pounds, beat highly-
rated Dick Sharkey of Detroit
Redford, to smash the state record
of 4.21.8 by more than four full
seconds.
The race opened, oddly enough,
with Jim Smith of Pontiac Cen-
tral setting a 440 pace. He prompt-
ly died on the second lap. The
duel between Sharkey and Scott
didn't appear until the middle of
the second lap. Sharkey had a
lead of five yards which Scott
began to close going into the
third lap.
Scott Shoots Ahead
Sharkey began to speed up and
Scott dropped back, still close.
At the beginning of the last lap,
signaled by a gun, Scott made
his move. He shot past Sharkey on
the first corner and the race was
as good as run. The large crowd,
stood and cheered as the little
runner lengthened his lead and
won haondily by more than 20
yards.

Cleveland
New York
Minnesota
Detroit
Los Angeles
Baltimore
Chicago
Kansas City
Boston
Washington

W
23
23
24
19
20
20
21
19
16
11

L
15
15
18
17
18
19
20
24
23
27'

Pct.
.605
.605
.571
.528
.526
.513
.512
.442
.410
.289

GB
3
3
3Y
3Y2
6Y2
7
12

Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Totals 31 1 6 1
a-Grounded out for Austry in 8th.
b-Singled for Cooley in 8th.
MICHIGAN 000 015 000-6 7 1
W. MICHIGAN 100 000 000-1 6 1
2B-Merullo. E-Chapman, Predo-
vic. SB-Merullo (3) Roebuck. Sac-
Chapman, Post, Drews, Michalski.
DP -- Chapman - Jones - Campbell.
HBP-Newman (Salo), Michalski
(Roebuck), Salo (Roebuck).
MICHIGAN 7, Western Michigan 11.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 12, Baltimore 6
Detroit 2, New York 1
Minnesota 4, Chicago 1
Kansas City 8, Los Angeles 7
Washington 8, Cleveland 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Kansas City (2)
Minnesota at Chicago (2)
Detroit at New York (2)
Cleveland at Washington
Baltimore at Boston

I

(Author of "I Was a Teen-age Dwarf","The Many
Loves of Dobie Gillis", tc.)

PITCHING SUMMARIES
IP H R ER BB SO
Roebuck (W. 8-2) 9 6 1 1 7 7
Salo (I,, 1-1) 52y! 5 3 4 3 3
Cooley 213-1 1 1 0 2
SECOND GAME
MICHIGAN AB R H RBI
Jones, 2b 4 1 2 0
Newman, ss 3 1 2 1
Chapman,'3b 4 0 2 2
Steckley, If 3 0 0 1
Tate, rf 2 1 0 0
Merullo, c 3 0 0 0
Campbell, lb 3 1 1 1
Post, cf 2 11 1
Kerr, p 3 10 0

NATIONALl

San Francisco
Los Angeles
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Houston
Philadelphia
Chicago
New York

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
31 14 .689
29 15 .659
24 16 .600,
23 16 .590
21 18 .538
'18 24 .429
17 25 .405
16 24 .400
14 28 .333
12 25 .324

GI$
1%
44/
5
7
111/
12%
12%
152
15

I

TILL WE MEET AGAIN

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
HE FLIES THROUGH THE AIR - Pete Goebel, instructor of the
local judo club, demonstrates a basic throw on one of his proteges,
Dave Dorff. The club. hopes to perform during halftime at next
year's basketball games.

"So far this year, we have only
16 members in the group. This is
really the number I wanted in it.
I don't believe I could teach a
larger group as well as I can one
this size," admits Goebel. "Next
semester, however, I shall try to
get someone more advanced than
I to take over as instructor, and
the resent group and myself can
also do some teaching."
As of now the clubrhas learned
to fall, and has learned to use
some of the basic throws and
holds. Although it may seem mi-
nor, falling is the first thing
taught to aspirants. In Japan,
where judo is a religion, they
spend three or four months learn-
ing to fall properly," notes Goebel.
Prevents Injuries
This is done mainly because it is
highly to a person's advantage to
know how to land if he finds him-
self flying through the air. He
could get hurt.
Falling, per se, also helps learn-
ers to acquire a necessary loose-
ness of the muscles during a
match.
The actual matches are' begun
by the "kotau" or official greeting.;
This involves a mutual grabbing
of uniforms, or GI's. Each man
holds onto the other's GI, above
the left elbow and on the left
side of the chest. The GI's are
strongly made, consisting of a
air of baggy pants an'd a loose
blouse, held of the wearer by a
cloth belt. It is the color of this
belt which denotes the wearer's
rank as a judo expert. There are
some 16 of these ranks above the
beginner class.
On With the Dance
After the kotau, the match is
begun.
In some ways, a judo match re-
sembles a waltz - that is, until
one man or the cther decides to
try for a fall. Then the resem-
blance ceases, unless the waltzers
are very clumsy indeed.
The opponents circle around,
gripping GI's, until one tries to
trip or throw the other to the

mat. Should he succeed, the match
would be over. If he manages only
a partial fall, or one judged infer-
ior by the referee, he will have to
apply a hold. To win with a hold,
it must be maintained for 30 sec-
onds or until the opponent can no
longer withstand the pressure.
Started Young
Goebel himself began studying
judo at an early age. "I began with
judo in 1949. I was living in Ham-
burg at the time, and judo was de-
clared illegal for German citizens
by occupation forces. It was con-
sidered a weapon. I was twice city
chamion of Hamburg in my weight
class and was once second in Ger-
many. The prizes for those who
finished high in the competition
were awarded a two-week course
taught by members of the Kodi-
kon, the Japanese judo institute
which establishes worldwide rules
and which raises judo to near per-
fection," reminisces Goebel.
"When I was in the service,
people always wondered why I
didn't use judo when I got into
a fight, or when a friend of mine
was in one. I did not'use it be-
cause I respect it too much as a
sport to use it in street fighting,"
he explains.

Totals
WESTERN MICHIGAN
Predovic, 2b
Drews, If
Gatza, cf
Michalski, ss
Kwiatowski, rf
Bidelman, 2b
Ihne, lb
Theder, c
Ortleib, p
a-Keniston

27 6 8 6
AB R H RBI
2 0 0 0
3 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
20 10 0
3 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
3 01 0

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco:7, New York 6 (10 Inn.)
Los Angeles,6. Philadelphia 3
St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 3
Houston 2, Pittsburgh 0
Cincinnati 11 Chicago 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelnhia at Los Angeles (2)
New York at San Francisco (2)
Pittsburgh at Houston (2)
Milwaukee at St. Louis
Chicago at Cincinnati
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Totals 24 0 4 0
a-Flied out for Ortleib in 7th.

MICHIGAN
W. MICHIGAN

000 100 5-6 8 0
000 000 0-0 4 2

2B-Jones. 3B-Campbell. SB-
Post. E-Predovic, Gatza. LOB --
MICHIGAN 3, Western Michigan 6.
PITCHING SUMMARIES
IP H R ER BB SO
Kerr (WV, 6-0) 7 4 0 0 4 3
Ortleib (L, 4-1) 7 8 6 5 3 4

This is the final column of my eighth year of writing for the
makers of Marlboro Cigarettes, and this year, as in every pre-
ceding year, when I come to the last column of the season, I
come to a problem.
My contract with the makers of Marlboro calls for me to
write a humor column and, truly, I do the best I can-all things
considered, I am not, I should explain, a jolly man by nature.
Why should I be? First of all, I am shorter than everybody.
Second, there are moths in my cashmere jacket. Third, I work
in television.
All the same, when it comes time to write this column, I light
a good Marlboro Cigarette, put aside my trauma, and try with
all the strength in my tiny body to make some jokes. Some-
times it works better than others, but on the last column of the
year, it just flatly doesn't work at all.
Even in the very beginning this was true-and that, you will re-
call, was eight years ago when I was relatively young and strong
and had not yet developed that nasty knock in my transmission.
Well do I remember sitting down to write the final column of my
first year. Day followed barren day, and not a yock, not a hoff,
not a zinger did I produce. I was about to give up humor and
take a job selling mechanical dogs when all of a sudden, in a
blinding flash, I realized why I couldn't think of any jokes!
I leapt up from my typewriter and ran as fast as my little
fat legs would carry me to the makers of Marlboro Cigarettes,
and I tugged my forelock, and I said, "Sirs, I am well aware
that you have engaged me to write a humor column, but today,
as I approach the final column of the season, I am far too misty
to be funny, for the final column of the season is, after all, a
leave-taking, and when I think of saying goodbye to my audience
-the swellest audience any columnist ever had-the college
students of America-wonderful human beings, every man and
IY
, 9
woman of them-wise but kindly-astute but compassionate-
perspicacious but forbearing-when, sirs, I think of saying good-
bye to such an audience, I am too shook up even to consider
levity, and so I ask you, sirs, to let me, in the final column of the
year, forego humor and instead write a simple, dignified,
straightforward farewell."
Then I took out my bandanna, wiped my eyes, ears, nose, and
throat and waited for a reply from the makers of Marlboro.
They sat around the polished board room table, the makers,
their handsome brows knit in concentration, puffing thought-
fully on the Marlboros in their tattooed hands. At length they
spoke. "Yes," they said simply.
I never doubted they would say yes. People who make a
cigarette as good as Marlboro must themselves be good. People
who lavish such care on blending tobaccos so mild and flavor-
ful, on devising a filter so clean and white, on boxing a flip-top
box so flip-top, on packing a soft pack so soft-people like that
are one hundred percent with me!
And so from that day forward, the final column of the year
--including the one you are, I devoutly hope, now reading--
makes no attempt to be funny, but is instead a simple thank
you and au revoir.

Competitive Sport
"Judo has become an Olympic
sport. Since most of the competi-
tors from the U.S. will be coming
from universities, we are trying to
emphasize it here at Michigan as
a competitive sport," says Goebel,
explaining the reason for the
group's formation.
"We know for certain that there
are regular -judo clubs at Illinois,
Wisconsin, Ohio State, and Michi-
gan State, and we hope to be able
to get scheduled competition
throughout the conference," he
adds, voicing the biggest aspira-
tion of the group.
The opportunities to make this
dream of a Big Ten judo league
ever come true will soon be out
of the group's hands. "I shall ap-
ply for University backing as an
official sport," states Goebel.
"Then, I shall write to the clubs
at other universities and also those
which have no clubs and try to get
+h4mhnal] ol +fe+ o'Ptinta-vn1in f

a

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