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February 16, 1962 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.8 'RinAY A FA+LR.TT lr*'T1 1

r 6L111nZ r C.lfiL UR11

ux la,'

TEOROLOGY:-
'redict Increase

u Weather Study

By MICHAEL JULIAR
Veather research will provide "a
d of rich opportunity for young
ple in the next 10 years," Prof'.
Wendell Hewson, director of the
teorological laboratories in the
ineering college, says.
L proposed tripling of manpow-
and expenditures for weather
earch has been recommended
a special panel of meteorolo-
s.
Established by the National
ademy of Sciences, the sugges-
n for the creation of the panel
s given by Jerome B. Wiesner,
President John F. Kennedy's
enee advised.
Need Research
,eed for the expanded research
gram is illustrated by the bil-
is of dollars of damage to prop-
y, forests and crops that is at-
>utable annually to weather fac-
s. The proposal would require
billion and 2,000 more engineers'
d scientists in the next 10 years.
?rof. Hewson says that in order
solve these problems, "we must
rn to work with weather and
nate, not against them."
rof. Hewson mentions an in-
esting job that some meteorol-
sts are now workig on - the
ather of other planets. With
a gathered by astronomers, the
teorologists are attempting to
derstand the weather on Mars,
nus and Jupiter.
Weather on Mars
'Weather phenomena on -Mars
not as complicated as that on
earth because it is an arid
net-mostly desert. The reason
our complex weather on the
th is that there Is a lot of water
e. Oceans and other bodies of
ter evaporate and condense and
nulti-faceted climate is a part
our daily life..
Because Mars has less water,
weather is simpler and by ob-
ving the planet, possibly an un-
standing of our own weather
1 come about," Prof. Hewson ex-
ins.
;omputers are one part of our
reasing technology that are
ying a greater part in weather
ecasting and analysis. For ex-
ple, at Suitland, Md., the Unit-
States Weather Bureau has a
ge computing center for short
long range weather forecasting.
)n the subject of future weath-
o Give Exam'
or Peace Corps
The next Peace Corps placement
t wil be given at 8:30 a.m. to-
rrow in the Civil Service Room
the Downtown Post Office.

er control, Prof. Hewson says that
there are two schools of thought.
The pessimists say that weather
phenomena are random processes.
Small causes produce large effects
and therefore control of the
weather would be next to impossi-
ble.
On the other hand are the op-
timists who say that there is a
close relationship between the
cause and effect.
"I would call myself an opti-
mist," Prof. Hewson says.
"There are certain steps that
must be reached before the next
ones can be achieved. Meteorol-
ogists must first make measure-
ments. After that, an understand-
ing can be gained and laws de-
duced from the data. Prediction of
the future weather is the next step
and last is control or modification.
"Right now we are trying to un-
derstand the weather and in the
process we have the ability to make
short, accurate forecasts of 24
hours or so.
Longer range forecasts are still
inaccurate and our control of the
weather is slight," he adds.
Schedule Debate
On Strength of UN
"Resolved: the United Nations
should be significantly strength-
ened" will be the topic of a debate
between the University and the
University of Toronto at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rackham Amph.
The negative will be argued by
University of Toronto's Edward
Gzik and James Kadonaga. Rais
Kahn, Grad, and Albert Fower-
baugh, '62, from the University,
will take the affirmative. An open
forum will be held after the de-
bate.
CORE To Discuss
Recent Convention
The Congress of Racial Equality
will present a report on the na-
tional convention held last week
in Cincinnati and the prospectus
for action in Ann Arbor at 7:30
p.m. today at the Friends Center.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
Last Chance to
Register for Classes
HEBREW
HISTORY
LITERATURE
Sunday, Feb. 18, 3 P.M.
1429 Hill St.

NSF Grant
To Finance'
Math Study
M ahThe National Science Founda-
tion has grantedtheUniversity
funds for a summer directed read-
ing program for any interested
undergraduate honors students
studying mathematics.
The student stipends will be $60
per week for the eight week sum-
mer session. Students will read in
such areas as analysis, geometry,
algebra and number theory. They
will meet with a faculty member
approximately once a week for
discussion and will consult in-
dividually with him.
Students will also have oppor-
tunities to do research in areas of
special interest.
Applications are available in the
office of Prof. Jack McLaughlin
of the mathematics department
and will be due the middle of next
week. Any junior, sophomore or
freshman in the literary college
honors program is eligible.
This is the first year the Uni-
versity's mathematics department
has received such a grant.

By DONNA ROBINSON
Sixteen University medical stu-
dents participated yesterday in the
annual Student Research Forum,
sponsored by Alpha Omega Alpha,
the medical students' honorary.
The forum, one of the highest
honors which an undergraduate
medical student can earn, con-
sisted of formal papers about ten
minutes long given in two simul-
taneous sessions in the Medical
Science Bldg.4
Some of the fields of research
covered in the papers included:
physiology, pharmacology, sur-
gery, internal medicine, pathology,
anatomy, bacteriology and pedia-
trics.
In the field of physiology, Peter
H. Abbrecht, '62M, spoke of his
research on how the rate of blood
flow into the kidneys affects their
efficiency in disposing of wastes
and regulating the body's salt.
content.
John W. Cowden, '64M, whose
specialization is pathology, re-
ported experiments carried on to

READ THESES:
Medical Students Attend
Annual Research Forum

determine the effects of ultra-
sound (very high frequency sound)
on normal tissue.
These experiments were under-
taken as a preliminary to studies
on the treatment of tumors with
ultra-sound. The high frequency
sound did destroy normal tissue
effectively, Mr. Cowden said. If
it can be focused accurately
enough it could be used to kill
tumors.
Rogert M. Komorn, '64M, a stu-
dent of pharmachology, spoke on
his investigation of edema, , and
excessive retention of extra-cel-
lular fluid in the body.
Other students participating in
the forum were: John D. Bartlett,
'63M; William D. Burton, '62M;
Harold R. Clure, '62M; Richard
W. Erbe, '64M; Verle E. Headings,
'64M; E. Larry Knight, '64M; Jan
Edward Leestma, '64M; James A.
Light, '64M; H. Roger Netzer,
'62M; Jerome S. Nosanchuk, '64M;
Tom R. DeMeester, '63M; John
Henzel, 62M; and T. Miyata, '65M.

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You Know Your Student Registration Card
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HERE'S WHAT'S COOK'N
*%1 OFF ON EVERY RECORD IN OUR STOCK*
Just show us your student registration card..
and you get this special discount.
OFFER GOOD FEB. 13 thru FEB. 19
Imports Excluded
-

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m

Take Time Out

Now

EXOTIC NAVAL VESSELS
...created by "BuShips" Engineers
The gigantic carriers, long range nuclear submarines and
missile-firing cruisers we hear so much about these days rep-
resent just the beginning. of a new Navy in the making.
Naval scientists and engineers, traditionally limited to de-
signing vessels that travel on or very near the surface, are
now concerned with complex scientific and military systems
that operate miles up- into Outer Space, miles down into
Inner Space ... as well as on, under or, over the surface.
This new Navy in the making of-
fers unparalleled opportunities for
the young engineer who wants to
increase his professional stature
... to move ahead to advanced
degrees .. . to participate in many of the most important
technological developments of the future.
Immediate openings exist at the Navy's Bureau of Ships
headquarters in Washington for the following:
1 GRADUATES in NAVAL ARCHITECTURE and
MARINE ENGINEERING . . . ELECTRICAL/
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING... and MECHANI-
CAL ENGINEERING to accept permanent positions
in Systems Design or Equipment Development.
2 STUDENTS in these same engineering areas who have
completed their Sophomore or Junior years to take
on interesting and well-paid summer assignments.
.3 AERONAUTICAL ENGINEER for a SPECIAL
POSITION doing Preliminary Design work on HY-
DROFOIL and HYDROSKIMMER CRAFT. This is
a most unusual opportunity for the right man to gain
special experience in this far-ranging new field .,.. ex-
perience unavailable anywhere else.
All permanent positions include the advantages of Career
Civil Service ...' liberal vacations and sick leave, wholly-
or partly-supported post-graduate education, participating
Health, Retirement and'Life Insurance Plans.
ON CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS
On Monday, February 19th, Arthur J.
Lynch, Technical Personnel Representa-
tive from the Bureauof Ships headquarters
will be on campus to interview interested
candidates. Please make arrangements to

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
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offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish
IPIZZAI
will be served doily from
12 Noon to 2 P.M. and 5 P.M. to 2 A.M.

l r
J

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Luncheons, 11:30 to 2:00 Dinners, 5:30 to 7:30
Sunday: Dinners, 12:00 to 3:00 Closed Mondays
We suggest that you telephone
- for reservations.

I.:

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A block west of Rackham Bldg.-NO 8-6056
I"

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from 5 P.M. to 2 A.M.

fELRI BAR
Freshly Remodeled - New Management
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OPEN 24 HOURS

CLOSED TUESDAYS

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Phone NO 2-9575

122 W. Washington

-" 'Y.S-

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PEN DAILY 11 :30 A.M.
UNDAYS 12:00 NOON
N:
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T NIGHT-FRENCH CUISINE
SDAY'S SMORGASBORD
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DAYS & SATURDAYS
ARENCE BYRD TRIO

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FINE
SEAFOOD

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