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May 22, 1962 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-22

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TUESDAY,'AY 22,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY 22,1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'M' Diamond men Beat Wayne State, 10-7

NO LET-DOWN:
Golfers Reverse Verdict
From Last Year's Meet

rI

Special To The Daily
DETROIT-The Michigan base-
ball team rebounded from its set-
backs this weekend and trounced
Wayne State, 10-7, yesterday.
The Wolverines, down 5-0 after
the first inning, chipped away at
the deficit and put across three
tallies in the ninth inning to walk
off with the victory.
The win went to Jim Bobel, his
first against two defeats. Bobel,
a sophomore, checked Wayne in
the final two rounds. Ed Nagel

(4-4) took the loss for the Tar-
tars.
The Wolverines' season record
is now 20-11.
Chapman Starts Rally
Michigan started the winning
splurge in the final inning when
Harvey Chapman singled to cen-
ter. Nagel, who pitched the entire
game, then struck out Dennis
Spalla. However, catcher Enrico
Odorico dropped the ball, and
when he attempted to throw

Spalla out at first, he hit him in
the back, and all hands were safe.
Joe Merullo walked to load the
bases and Dave Campbell knocked
a sacrifice fly to score Chapman
with the winning run. After the
runners were advanced to second
and third, Dick Post singled them
in for two insurance runs.
Starter Bob Dunston was tagged
for all five runs in the first, and
left in favor of fireman Wayne
Slusher in the following inning.

LITTLE BITTY TEAR:

Nine lecalls Season's

Ending

By MIKE BLOCK
The Big Ten baseball season is,
all over for Michigan's Wolverines
-all over except for the memories.
For the Wolverines, who led the
league almost all year, dropped a
doubleheader to Wisconsin on the
final day, and finished a game be-'
hind Illinois.
All, to be sure, is not lost.
Michigan still has a chance to,
get into the regionals for the
NCAA championships. The pic-
ture at this point appears a bit
uncertain, but the meetings atj
Fort Wayne, Ind., this Sunday
will determine the four entrants
in the Wolverines'region. Right
now things look like this:
Sure Picks
Illinois and Western Michigan,
as champions of their respective.
conferences, are virtually auto-
matic choices to be two of the
four regionalists. The remaining,
two will most likely emerge from
the trio of Detroit, Notre Dame;
and Michigan. Of these, it would
appear that the Titans are the
most likely choice, as they have
lost only one game all season, and
have defeated the Wolverines on
two occasions.
On the other hand, Notre Dame's
record is 10-6, and the Irish were
buried by the Wolverines 18-7
in the first contest between the
two. The second was washed out
with Michigan sporting a 2-0 lead
in the fourth.
A good part of Michigan's
chances for an invitation hinge.
on its performance in a three-
game set against Western this
weekend. If the Wolverines cop
two or three games from the
Broncos, Notre Dame may be elim-
inated from contention.
Cincy Scratched
Michigan's hopes were raised
Saturday when Bradley beat out
Cincinnati for the Missouri Valley
Conference championship. The
Major League
Standings.
M * Of Ot

Bearcats are the only team in
that circuit residing in the Wol-
verines' region, and, had they
taken the crown, would probably
have displaced both Michigan -and
Notre Dame. But Bradley, in a
separate area, poses no competi-
tion. ,
But even the prospects of the
NCAA tourney can't dim the mem-
ory of what happened at Loman
Field in Madison, Wis., on May
19, 1962. The men of Don Lund
lost the games fair and square,
but they remember the things
that just might have gone the
other way - - -
Memories, Memories
They remember how they had
Badger hurler Stan Wagner, who
was the winner in both games, on'
the ropes in the third, inning of
the first game. The Wolverines
were ahead 2-1, and Dick Honig
was on second and Ron Tate on
first with two out. Power man Jim
Steckley was up, but instead of
pitching to him, Wagner whirled
and fired to second.
Honig was picked off to end the
inning, killing the rally. But even
worse, the star shortstop gashed
the little finger of his left. hand
and had to be carted off to the
hospital for six stitches. But Jim
Newman stepped in for him and
did a more than adequate job
the rest of the afternoon.
They remember how the Wis-
consin fans were tormenting them
with some rather unprintable re-
marks all afternoon. Joe Jones was.
their favorite victim of the day,
but he and his teammates bore the
brunt bravely until the end of
the second game.
Homer Happy
They remember how they drilled
four homers, one of their top
barrages of the year, only to see
their efforts go in vain. Steckley
and Dave Campbell hit two apiece
into the helpful, gale blowing out
towards left field. But the wind
also aided two of the three Bad-
ger homers.
They remember how, in the
sixth inning of the nightcap, Jones
silenced his critics with a line
single to left to drive John Kerr
in from second and put Michigan
ahead 5-4. At that point, Phil
Amberlang relieved Wisconsin
starter Ron Nelson. With two out,
Jones broke for second on Am-
belang's first pitch to Newman.
The pitch brushed Newman back,
and Russ Williams threw Jones
out at second. But Newman felt
something more than wind on
his left arm, and both he and
Lund protested that he be award-
ed first, and that Jones be auto-
matically advanced to second.
Vetoed by Ump
But the umpire said no, and in-
stead of having two men on base
with the power boys, Tate, Steck-
ley and Dennis Spalla coming up,
the rally was over.
They remember how John Kerr
was within one out of insuring at
least a tie for the championship.
With two gone in the last of the
seventh of the second game, Luke

Lamboley, the Badgers' best per-
centage hitter, lifted a long fly
to deep right center. The pellet
came to earth between the out-
stretched arms of Steckley and
Spalla, and Lamboley came to
earth with a triple.
Power hitter Pat Richter, who
had already gotten four for eight,
including a triple and a homer,
was the next batter. Thus Lund
excused Kerr for the day and
brought in his stopper, Fritz Fish-
er. Richter was nothing new to
the fireballing lefthander. In fact,
Richter had batted against him
all last summer in South Dakota,
and Fisher hadn't yielded him a
single hit.
Heart Break
So Fisher wound up and tossed
Richter a low outside fast ball,
which had been, so successful for
him all summer. But Richter re-
paid Fisher for all the previous
embarrassments the redhead had
given him. On the first pitch,
Richter hit the ball to the opposite
field, against the wind, 400-plus
feet away from the plate. And
along with that baseball, the Big
Ten championship departed from
the Wolverines' grasp for the 1962
season.
And they remember what hap-
pened after the game was over.
With the team still walking slowly
off the field, and Richter being
enthusiastically mobbed by his
mates, the Wisconsin fans con-
tinued to heckle the visitors. That
was too much to take. Almost in-
stantaneously fists were swinging,
not between the two teams, but
between Michigan players and
some of the more outspoken Bad-
ger rooters.
Unkindest Cut
And when order was restored,
with no one badly hurt, the men
from Michigan heard the greatest
insult of all. The public address
speaker blared, "Come on, Michi-
gan, let's be good sports-the game
is over." And not 'a word about
the good sports in the bleachers
who attacked the Wolverines' par-
entage repeatedly on perhaps the
most crucial day of their long
season.
They remember all these things
-but they can also remember
their 12 straight victories which
made them the most feared club
in the league. Because of their
reputation, they always had to
face the best pitchers of every
team they met.
And for twelve straight times
they came through like the cham-
pions they almost were.
"Keep A-Head
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Slusher pitched six innings,-of fine
relief ball giving up just two un-
earned runs in the seventh.
The Wolverines collected only
seven hits, but were aided by five
Tartar miscues. They received
their largest dividend via the error
route in the seventh, scoring three
times without the benefit of a hit
or a free pass.
Three-Ring Circus
The comical frame began when
Joe Jones was tagged with a pitch-
ed ball and Chapman landed on
first on an error. Spalla then was
safe on a fielder's choice, and
Wayne State proceeded to heave
the sphere all over the lot. All
three runners scampered across
the plate to give Michigan a tem-
porary 6-5 advantage.
In the bottom of the seventh,
the Wolverines proceeded to hand
the lead right back to their op-
ponents when Merullo and Post
zommitted errors to allow two Tar-
tars to score.
But the game was knotted in the
eighth when Post walked and
Charlie Heavenrich, battting for
Slusher, advanced him to second
with an infield grounder. Odor-
ico's passed ball moved Post to
third, and he scored on a fly by
Jones.
Spalla was Michigan's big gun,
collecting three hits, including a
double. Merullo and Campbell also
blasted two-baggers, both of which
accounted for runs.
Fight Welcomed
By Commissioner
DETROIT (R) - State Boxing
Commissioner Dave Gudelsky indi-
cated yesterday he would welcome
the proposed Floyd Patterson-
Sonny Liston heavyweight title
showdown here.

By JIM BERGER
Big Ten golf is a crazy sport.
Last season Michigan went un-
defeated through its dual meet
season. It defeated Ohio State
twice, Michigan State, Indiana and
others.
Michigan went to the conference
meet at Bloomington with an ex-
cellent chance to take the confer-
ence tournament. Three solid vet-
erans occupied the top three po-
sitions on the teams, a sophomore
at number four and two consis-
tent juniors in the last two posi-
tions.
Michigan finished seventh in
that meet. The team collapsed
after the first round and it was
downhill all the way. Every team
that Michigan had faced and de-
feated in the regular season ex-
cept Northwestern and Illinois
finished above Michigan. Ohio
State won.
This year the opposite took
place.
Michigan didn't place first in
any of its meets, except one with
Detroit, a team which has trouble
breaking 80. They went to Cham-
paign, the site of the conference
meet, a solid choice for the second
division.
Had Confidence
Everyone at the meet, except
the Michigan team and Coach Bert
Katzenmeyer, wouldn't have
thought of Michigan as having a
chance to 'take the title, or even
finish in the top five.
As a matter of fact Iowa coach
Charles Zwiener h1ad a small side
wager with Katzenmeyer on the
meet. Iowa also had a poor record
but Zwiener thought he had a
good bet.

Michigan was the surprise of
the tourney. Not only did the Wol-
verines finish third in the cham-
pionships, but they nearly walked
away with the crown. Only 14
strokes separated Michigan with
winner Indiana, only nine separ-
ated them from second-place Pur-
due.
Won Bet
Katzenmeyer won his bet easily.
Iowa finished dead last.
No single individual can be
singled out as the star for Mich-
igan. It was just a story of when
half the team was good the other
half was bad and vice versa.
Tom Pendlebury was the closest
thing to a star when he went
through the first 36 holes two un-
der par, but he didn't helpmuch
the second day. Captain Bill New-
comb had a bad first day but
scored a 77-72 the second day.
Chuck Newton couldn't do any-
thing in the morning but came
back with two 73's in- the after-
noon round, while Dave Cameron
and Gary Mouw scored well in the
a.m. but weren't as sharp in the
p.m. Even Tom Ahern, who was
counted on for four 80's, came
through with two 78's in the first
day.
Maybe if Michigan can finish
last in every regular season meet
next year the Wolverines might
bring home the conference cham-
pionship.

16

r

SUMME R JOBS
SUM ERFOR MALE
STUDENTS
Applications now being accepted for summer jobs
with major national corporation. Young men 18
years of age or over wanted to work in marketing,
sales promotion and brand identification positions
during summer. Will work with high level executive
managements

7ULLEU WE EI' IN1EnMUU
WHERE THE GIRLS AREI
Each spring, thousands of well-
heeled kids cut loose in Ber-
muda. In this week's Post,
you'll find out what really
goes on at these beach-house
binges. And why one young-
ster says: "You're supposed to
go home paler than you came."
The Saturday Evening
MAY26 ISSUE/NOW ON SALE

9

SCHOLARSH I PS:
SALARY:
SEE BRITAIN:

16-1,000Scholarships
16--$500 Scholarships
Can earn in excess of $150 per week
Guaranteed $98 per week
Win an all-expense paid holiday in
England for entire week.

L

:.1

AMERICANl

Cleveland
New York
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Chicago
Baltimore
Detroit
Kansas City
Boston.
Washington

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
21 13 .618
20 13 .606
22 15 .595
18 15 .545
20 18 .526
18 17 .514
16 17 .485
17. 21 .447
13 21 .382
9 24 .273

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 10, Baltimore 7
Minnesota 5, Washington 3
Detroit 7, Chicago 3
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Boston,
Los Angeles at New York
Minnesotaat Washington
Baltimore at Cleveland
Only gaines scheduled
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
x-San Francisco 28 11 .606
x-St. Louis 22 13 .629
Los Angeles 21 15 .605
Cincinnati 19 15 .605
Pittsburgh 18 16 .529
Milwaukee 16 21 .432
Philadelphia 15 20 .428
New York 13 20 .393
Houston 14 23 .379
Chicago 12 25 .324
x-Playing on coast.

GB
"4
2%
3
6
8
111A
GB
4
41.
6x/2
7%
11
11
1212
13
15

Those students who qualify may continue their association next
semester on a part time basis.
For interview call College Director
DETROIT-WO 5-0561
GRAND RAPIDS-GL 6-7451
LANSING - IV 2-5806
SOUTH BEND-CE 2-1353

44
:.ke'O Should we aint
{k =rein the uclear are
0. How do you feel .0 Wha
rabout fraternities? you
of difff
fl;; Like 'em ~ Don't like 'em C Friends
?' p I Can take 'em or leave 'em C7 OC

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 8, Chicago 4
Cincinnati at Milwaukee (ppd. rain)
St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 1
Houston 3, New York 2
San Francisco at Los Angeles (n)
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at Milwaukee
Philadelphia at St. Louis'
New York at Houston
.San Francisco at Los Angeles

DAY OF PRAYER FOR PEACE - FOR ALL PEOPLE
OBSERVANCE of a "Day of Prayer For the Peace of All People,"
is being sponsored by the Prayer Fellowship of the First Presbyterian
Church, 1432 Washtenaw. You are welcome to pray and meditate in
this sanctuary at any time from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Leaflets will
be available to guide you in your meditation, if you so desire.
EVERYONE - students, persons of any faith, townspeople or
strangers are encouraged to pray for peace daily and especially to join
us in this concerted prayer for the peace of all peoples and all nations,
on May 23.

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