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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 20, 1962 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE TEN

WEEKEND MEETING:I
Conference Scrutinizes Future of "U' ~

.4'

Group Views
Honor Student
The role of the student in ad-
ministrative decision making and
a proposal to establish an advisory
planning board for the University
were two of the major issues an-
alyzed by the group discussing ad-
ministration.
There ,was a consensus among
the administrators present that
student help in an advisory ca-
pacity' would be welcomed by the
administration in attmepting to
solve a number of University prob-
lems.
Several students suggested that
it mnight be possible for the ad-
ministration to work through the
student organizations for the pur-
pose of both obtaining student
opinion and getting students to
participate along with the admin-
istration in actual legislation.
There were many problem areas
which students coiuld take upon
themselves to work out, Assistant
Dean of Men John Bingley sug-
gested.
What to do about the problem
of the noise on the Diag which
disturbs students in classes and
in the General Library Is only one
situation which might be handled
by the students.
Former Daily City Editor Philip
Sherman, '62, proposed that a
planning board composed of paid
faculty members might be estab-
lished as an advisory group on
academic affairs.
While the group would not have
final power, it could aid planning
in te varius scols an colleges
self-criticism, he said.
Student assistance might also
be integrated into the work of
su -1h a planning board, the group
agreed.
pressed concrntat teamns
tration fails to make public the
rationale used in arriving at vari-
ous iportant decisions such -as
"The adminlistration doesn't run
the University," Vice-President for
Business and Finance Wilbur K.
Pierpont countered. "Assuming
that the University is an elite in-
stitution, students ought to be-
lieve that administrative deci-
~sions are made by honest, re-
sponsible people."
"It isn't necessary that students
receive an explanation," Bingley
Said. "When one places people in
the position of making decisions,
one has to have faith In them.'"
"We want an institution where
people are interested in the Uni-
versity," Sherman noted. "More
student dscussion about Univer-
sity prolm ol eawy t
encourage this."
Wakefield Sets
Congressional Bi
Former Detroit Tiger outfielder
Dick Wakefield has announced
that he will seek the Democratic
nomination for Congress from the
second district.

fView .Values
Of Research
Discussing the relationship of
research and teaching at the Uni-
versity, one conference group con-
sidered ways that undergraduates
might benefit from research ac-
tivity.
Recognizing that research is oft-
en viewed as a service rather than
a scholarly function, the group
discussed the reasons for image of
" esach vs. education,,
rDirector of Research Adminis-
tration Robert Burroughs com-
mented that it is possible to in-
tegrate research more than we do
now into our instructional facili-
He noted the failure - by pee-
ple both inside and outside the
University - to recognize that re-
search and instruction really are
two aspects of the University's
major function: education.
Burroughs pointed out, however
that there is a great deal of "un-
sponsored research," done by in-
dividuals using existing facilities
and budgets andpoftedone within
The group observed that re-
search can help the undergradu-
ate by attracting prominent men
to the faculty, improving the over-
all quality of the University.
Bute oProf. Frederick H. Wagman,
diretor f Unverity ibraies
noted that undergraduates are
often taught, not by the scientist
and prominent scholar, but by
younger men just beginning and
by teaching fellows.
About 800 undergraduates are
employed on research projects at
the University, Burroughs said.
He suggested that these exper-
job; te could cbecome a part of
the student's education -- if the
faculty researchers would encour-
age and aid the employed student
to pursue certain aspects of the
Memnbers of the group observed
that because administrative steps
have separated the teaching and
research functions, a feeling has
developed that research dollars of-
fered by -the federal government
and by industry for specific proj-
ects are somehow tainted.
To Strnten
Bike riders can expect a stricter
enforcement of University regula-
ito 0Peter A. Ostafin, assistant
to the vice-president for Student
Aff airs.
b"Regretfully, impoundmentn wl
week, he s2.id. .
The worst areas of improper bi-
cycle congestion surround the Un-
dergraduatesLibrary, thhe Frez
rangles.
The congestion of bicycles con-
stitutes a safety hazard as well as
. an inconvenience, Ostafin said.

Seeks Integrati
and me hscited theu nee fo
integration in education and
methods for making instruction
more beneficial.
-Education has to be an organic,
developmental process, Prof. Louis
L~. Orlin of the astronomy depart-
ment said. However, the group
Questioned whether the University
should be responsible for the over-
all design of the student's edu-
cation. .
It was the consensus that inte-
cept, a particula tie ror an area
Lynn Lopata, '62, suggested that
a vertical division of studying one
period from several different as-
pects might be desirable.
Roger W. Heyns, vice-president,
for academic affairs, questioned
what was meant by integration.
He contended that there are no
integrating concepts like religion
any more. Although '"there is a
natural desire for order, the world
is not orderly but confused and
mixed-up," he indicted.
Nevertheless, the group decided
that people do miss unity, and
that there are methods of en-
couraging synthesis. The survey-
type course brings diverse infor-
mation together. A comprehensive
examination or a test given by
an external examiner-some other
than the course instructor-would
also aid integration.
Prof. Orlin suggested a non-
course experience as a means to
the organization of knowledge. He
proposed a college lecture series
on diverse topics which would be
open to all students.
Prof. Orlin also suggested that

on of Methods
an "elite core of teachers" sim-
ilar to Harvard's roving profes-
sors, could be detached from their
departments and act as over-
seers.
One member of the group said
that real integration comes when
there is joint interest in a prob-
lem. "When you find a problem
which can't be solved with the
tools of one discipline, you go to
another," he indicated.
The group cited problems in
methodology. Foreign language in-
struction is difficult because it is
so elementary compared to other
subjects studied by college stu-
dents. The group thought that in
the future language proficiency
would be a prerequisite for ad-
mission rather than a distribution
requirement.
Heyns said that the University's
failure to encourage the use of the
foreign language after the £tu-
dent gains the mastery constitutes
"an immoral system."
The relationship of class hour
and material is another problem.
The consensus was that there is
much work the student can do on
his own through summer reading
for credit programs, programmed
learning, and independent study.
However, the group also empha-
sized the importance of close con-
tact between student and instruc-
tor.
The group raised the question
of the possibility of teacher evalu-
ation to insure a hig'h calibre of
instruction. However, the difficul-
ties involving the restriction of
academic freedom, caused the
group to doubt the possibility of
implementation.

a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a p - ~* w r - w - - - - -

})
BAT HING BEACH
1 1400 East Shore Drive
AT WHITEMORE LAKE
1miles north of Ann Arbor by way o U. S. 2
THE BEST SAND BEACH
______-__._ SOUT HERN MIC HIGAN
is now open
HIGH SLIDES . HIGH DIVE
DIVING BENCH ES * 130 PICNIC BENCH ES
Cormplete line of BAT H ING SU ITS for

ARRIVAL-Pledges arrive at the main lodge of the Fresh Air Camp and re- IN THE BAG-Fraternity pledges struggle to
ceive their instructions and rakes from group leaders. After adjusting to the pile the dead leaves and branches in the large
heat, they stream off into the woods to collect the leaves which have been piling tarpaulins to clear the tennis court area.
up since last September.
Facing a 90 degiee heat spell, ~-
buzzing mosquitoes and poison ivy, ~
fraternity and soiority pledges
helped to clean up the University ~
Fresh Air Camp.
SHelp Week, an annual pioject ~..... .
4Nof Junior Panhellenic Association
*and Junior Inter-Fraternity Coun-
il, lasted from Monday through ~
SThe Fresh Air Camp, operated
by the psychology department,.,.
ges a camping experience to un-
drrvlgdboys with behavior ~".~:::'
dprilesgTe camp is staffed with . .
students inthe School of Nursing,
Education, and Social Work and
psychology department.r se
The workers boarded buses at
the Michigan Union and worked(
n double shifts raking leaves, re-
moving logs and cleaning up the
buildings.
SAfter completing their work for
* the day, the pledges went swim-
ming in the camp lake, ate ice
cream and relaxed in the main
building before returning to Ann :$K:
Junior Panhel offered a new in-
centive to create interest in the
'project. A scroll will be presented LEAF GATHERING-Handlinig the rakes like experts, workers
to the sorority pledge class which pile up the leaves so a crew can carry thyem off. Help Week is an
hasthehigestperentge f grls annual project which is supported each year by' a large number
has he hghet pecc nageof grls of fraternity and sorority pledge classes.
who worked at the camp.
.The co-chairmen for the pro-________________________________
jetSeharon Albrechtn '65 2nd
and Alfred Remsen, '64 presiden Photogra phs by CaptIOns and Story by
S poe a800 plegess trned out BRUCE TAYLOR BARBARA LAZARUS
STRENUOUS WORK each day to bring the total for the
** not like home week to 600. ______________________________

TIINELIT you have Used Books
to SellRead This!
As the Semester end approaches-bringing with it a period of heavy book setting by students-ULRICH'S
would like to review with your their BOOK BUY-BACK POLICY.
Used books fall into several categories, each of which-because of the law of supply and demand-has
its own price tag. Let's explore these various categories for your guidance.
CLASS I.
A textbook of current copyrights-used on our campus-and which the Teaching Department involved
has approved for re-use next semester-has the highest market value. Lf ULRICH'S needs copies of this book
we will offer 50% of the list price for copies in good physical condition. When we have sufficient stock cf a title
for the coming semester, ULRICH'S will offer a "WHOLESALE PRICE" which will be explained later in this
article. (T HIS IS ONE R EASON FOR SELL ING ALL YOUR USED BOOKS AT ONCE.)
CLASS lI.
Some of the above Class I books will be offered which have torn bindings, loose pages or other physical
defects. These will be priced down according to the estimated cost of repair.
CLASS III.
Each semester various professors decide to change texts for a given course. These decisions on change of
textbooks are mnade in echelons of THINKING AND AUTHORITY far above the level of your local book retailers,
AND ULRICH'S HAS NO PART IN THE DECISION. (QUITE OFTEN WE HAVE MANY COPIES OF THE OLD
TITLE OF WHICH YOU HAVE ONLY ONE.)
However, ULRICH'S, DO enter the picture with our WHOLESALE connections. Somewhere there may be a
professor who will adopt a cast-off book from Michigan. WHOLESALE BOOK JOBBERS take a gamble on this and
offer to buy our over-stock and yours.
If the dropped title is a current edition, and from a well known publisher, the Jobber offer to us is usually
25% of list. AS A SERVICE TO YOU, ULRICH'S WILL BUY THESE DROPPED TITLES FOR WHAT THE JOBBER
OFFERS.

COOL PLUNGE-Taking a well deserved rest, some tired workers dive into the camp lake to es-
cape the heat and to get their first real swim of the season. The Fresh Air Camp owns a large water-
front area with facilities for swimming, boating, canoeing and fishing for the young campers to enjoy
during the summer.

FLYING LEAVES
. no skill needed

I

CLASS IV.

,A..kr ,mnA niihfiehpr frninntlv hrina out new editions. When we "Qet caught" with an old edition,

.x..~~:*-:+.:..=...... ...., - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5' A a

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