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May 19, 1962 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-19

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.qATiTRDAV_ MAV 141 1491k

PAGE SIX QATTT1~I1&V ftMA'V 10 10~

ii u lir x, 1F'1Hx 1J, i az

f.

Four

Wolverine

Teams

in

Contention

for

Crowns

Racketmen
Widen Gap
By TOM ROWLAND
Special To The Daily
MINNEAPOLIS - A single con-
solation match lost provided the
only black mark on an otherwise
perfect Michigan tennis day here
yesterday as the high-flying Wol-
verine courtman stretched their
lead over trailing Northwestern in
semifinal action of the conference
tourney.
The defending champs took nine
matches to push the Blue mark
to 512, leading the challenging
Wildaats now by eight points.
And today, there will be a Wol-
verine in every one of the final
matches except one.
Senkowsk vs. Riessen
Michigan's Ray Senkowski shot
himself ito today's first-singles
finals with a 7-5, 6-1, win over
Iowa's Steve Wilkinson. Wilkinson,
whom Iowa's coach, Donald Klotz
regards as one of the best in the
country, broke out in front of Sen-
kowski 3-0 in the first set, but the
Wolverine ace pulled even and
fought the Hawkeye to a 5-5 dead-
line. Senkowski blasted his way to
the next game on his devastating
serve, and won the clincher with
a tricky shot that just skimmed
the net tape. The second set was
all downhill.
Meanwhile, Marty Riessen, who
clashes head-on with Senkowski
today in the highlight match of
the tournament, blanked Minne-
sota's John Desmond, 6-0, 6-0.
Fauquier Advances
H a r r y Fauquier, Michigan's
number-one seeded second singles
man, advanced by default. He'll
take on Illinois' Frank Noble to-
day in the finals. Noble, who won
yesterday over Ross Helft of Pur-
due, lost to Fauauier during the
regular season 6-3, 6-3.
Gerry Dubie's booming serve
was right on target yesterdayas
the Wolverine senior eased by
i'Northwestern's Tig Templeton,
6-1, 6-1. And if past records are a
good sign, the Michigan third man
-Won't have to sweat much today
He'll be up against MSUs Ton
Jamieson, who fell to Dubie eal
her this spring, 5-0, 6-1.
Wolverine Jim Tenney had to
come back after dropping his first
set to Iowa's Mike Schrier, 6-4.
But the Michigan. captain, came
through with the goods when the
goods were needed. He rallied,
knocked Schrier 6-1 in the sec-
ond stanza, and took the deciding
set on a love game, 6-2.
The most pleasing Wolverine
surprise in numbe' six singles
where Ron Linclau put on the
"big game" to racquet himself into
the finals. The Michigan sopho-
more grabbed a 6-2, 6-2, win over
Iowa's Ray Benton on Thursday
and yesterday ran Fred Heivilin
out of the brackets 6-4, 6-3.
Double Trouble
Michigan's Senkowski-Fauquier
duo battled to a 4-5 in their first
set yesterday with Brian Eisner
and Jack Damson of Michigan
State. The Wolverine pair took the
next game on four smashes, took
two games the firstset, and eased
their way through the second 6-1.
They're set to take on Northwest-
ern's Riessen and Bob Ericson in
the finals today.
The Wildcat pair won yesterday
in a marathon effort 19-17, 6-4.
Dubie and Tenney Again
Dubie and Tenney had a tough
fight in the second doubles, but
finally pulled out a 6-3, 6-8, 6-2
win. First seeders, the Michigan
number two pair clashes with
MSU's Dick Colby and Tom Wier-
man today. Dubie and Tenney
downed the Spartan pair earlier
this season.
Tom Beach and Linclau quali-
fied for today's championship
match in third doubles with a 3-6,
6-1, 6-0, victory over Illinois' duo

Thurston Brown and Bruce Staf-
ford.
Beach, who dropped out of the
running Thursday,' won in first
round consolation play yesterday,
6-4, 6-2, over Gopher Scott Lins-
ley, but lost in the semifinals 6-4,
7-5, to MSU's Ron Lickman.

Tate Scores Winning Run on Wild Heave
As 'M' DiamondmenEdge Wildcats, 3-2

"M" STARS - Harry Fauquier (1) reached the finals of the numb er
competition. Joe Jones (c) started the Wolverines two-run rally in the
Wisconsin Leads Track Meet I
As Michixan Places in Finals
I

-Daily-Bruce Taylor U
two singles and the number one doubles yesterday in tennis
first inning and Ron Tate (r.) scored the winning third run.

(Continued from Page 1)
with a two run explosion in the
top of the first. Joe Jones bunted
the first pitch of the game up the
third base line fr a single and ad-
vanced to second on Dick Honig's
grounder to short.
After Ron Tate walked, Jim'
Steckley sent a blistering ground-
through the picket fence for a
ground rule double, Jones scoring
and, Tate moving to third. Then
Dennis Spalla drove a fly to deep
center to bring in Tate.
Winning Margin
The Wolverines added what
proved to be the winning run in
the ninth when Wildcat pitcher
Jim Humay walked Tate and
Steckley. After botd runners ad-
vanced on Spalla's tap to first,
Humay unleashed a wild pitch and
Tate tallied easily.
Fisher was buzzing along to his
first shutout of the year when he
weakened a bIt in the eighth. Cal-
vert opened the round with a
double past Steckley in left and
scored when Harvey Chapman
fielded Bob Shilling's scratch hit
and threw wild to first. With Shill-
ing on second, Fisher then pro-
ceeded to mow down the three
On to Wisconsin! -

hitters although advancing 'the
runner to third via a wild pitch.
Then in the ninth Fisher got
himself into trouble again when
Bill Walberg walked and Dave
Hirtz singled him to second. A
passed ball by Joe Merullo put
runners on second and third with
none gone, but Fisher calmly
worked himself out of the jam.
The turning point came on Jack
Blaeser's sacrifice fly which scored
on the throw to the plate, Hirtz
Walberg. Instead of going to third
remained on second. He could only
go to third on Humay's bouncer
to second and remain there when
Calvert fanned to end the game.
Fisher's only other shaky inning
was the fourth. After Rollie Wah
le doff with a free pass, Bob Sni-
der beat out a hP off of Fisher's
glove. Merullo then made whta

proved to be a game-saving throw
to pick Wall off second. A ground-
rule double by Walberg and a walk
to Bleaser couldn't put Northwest-
ern in the scoring column.
Michigan almost added another
run in the seventh when Fisher
doubled to left and was out at
home trying to score on Jones's
base knuck to center.
Fisher, in chalking his fourth
win against an equal number of
losses, threw only 105 pitches, the
least of his college career. He
struck out five batters, walked
only three, and was generally on
top of the hitters, Fisher is now
3-2 in the Big Ten.
Dave Roebuck (7-1) and John
Kerr (5-0) will face the Badgers
today in the Wolverines' Big Ten
curtain call.

By STAN KUKLA
Special To The Daily
,LAFAYETTE - After yester-
day's qualifying round, Michigan
chances of repeating in the Big
Ten outdoor track championships
seemed dim.
A heavy thunder shower drained
the early stages of the qualifying
rounds for the discus and the
broad jump, cooled the air quick-
ly, and wet down the track. It was
feared that the runners would
have to run in the rain but, for-
tunately, the rain only lasted for
a few minutes.
The meet started under dark
skies and the sky seems just a
little darker to the Wolverines two
hours later when the trials were
over.
Finals were held yesterday in
The broad jump was won by foot-
the broad jump and the discus.
bailer Paul Warfield of Ohio state
with the jump of 24 ft. 8%/4 ins.
Michigan did not place anyone in
this event.
Soudek placed second in the
discus with a throw of 161 ft., 9/2
in. The event was won by Elmels
Ezerins of Wisconsin. Ohio State
was the leader after yesterday's
action with seven points. Wiscon-
sin was second with six points.
Michigan and Indiana were tied
for third with four points each.
Northwestern and Purdue were the
only schools who finished the ac-
tion without any points to their
credit.
The Michigan cindermen were
able to get only six men in the
finals of the seven events which
require qualification - the 100-
yds., 220-yds., and 440-yd. dashes,
the 660-yd. and 880-yd. runs, the
120-yd. high hurdles, and the 220-
yd. low hurdles.
Because of the low number of
entrants in each event, the offi-
cials decided to srcatch the semi-
finals and just hold qualifying
rounds with the finals coming at
2:10 this afternoon.
The result of this system is eight
men running in the finals instead
of the usual six, accounting for the
M' Trails
440-YD. DASH - Higginbottom.
(Wis); Mills and Sneed (Pur); Clin-
ton (d); Paigs (OSU); Fischer
(Minn); Parker (MSU); Iollings-
worth (a). Best Time-:47.8 by
Mills (Pur).
100-YD. DASH-Adams (Pur); Paul
Warfield (OSU);Burnley (Mich);
Smith (Wis); Ford and Lewis
(MSU); Townsend (NW); Jackson
(Ind). Best Time-:09.7 by Adams
(Pur).
660-YD RUN-Gill, Cotton, and
Creagan (Wis); Mount (Pur); Aqui-
no (Mich); Hornung (MSU); Kerr
(a); Robinson (OSU). Best Time-
1:20 by Mount (Pur), and Gill (Wis).
120 HIGH HURDLES-Mann, John-
son, and Peckham (MSU); Muller,
Dix and Howard (Wis); McRae
(Mich); Ragsdale (Pur). Best Time
-:14.2 by McCrae (Mich).
DISCUS FINALS - 1, Ezerins
(Wis), 162'5"; 2, Soudek (Mich), 161'-
9"; 3, Webb (a), 161'2"; 4. Mid-
dieton (OSU), 163'7"; 5, Henrickson
(Wis), '148'10".
BROAD JUMP FINAL-1, Warfield
(OSU), 24'8"; 2, Jackson (Ind),
23'7/"; 3, Taylor (Ill), 23'3"; 4,
Lewis (MSU), 23'; 5, Pedersen
(Minn), 22'82".
880-YD. RUN-Frazier, Trimble,
and Fischer (Ia); Leps and Hayes
(Mich); Castle (MSU); Dundy (Ill);
Reitan (Wis). Best Time-1:51.9,
Frazier (Ia).
220-YD. DASH - Adams (Pur);
Ford, Parker and Lewis (MSU);
Yavorski and Blanheim (l); Jack-
son (nd); Smith (Wis). Best Time
-:21.1, Adams (Pur).

great many qualifiers that some
schools have placed (both Wiscon-
sin and Michigan State have 12
men in the finals of these seven
events).
Bennie McRae was the only run-
ner who placed in two events yes-
terday for Michigan. He won with-
out any effort in both the 120-yd.
highs and the 220 lows. Ergas Leps
won his heat of the 880-yd. run
with his patented kick. Coming
out of the final turn, he was run-
ning fifth. Then he kicked, and
beat Tor Reitea of Wisconsin by
two yards.
Sprinter Ken Burnley of Mich-
igan had to be the surprise of the
day. Not only did he ignore a
pulled leg muscle to compete in
the 100-yd. dash, but also placed
among finalists.
Other finalists today are Chuck
Aquino who ran an excellent race
in the 660 but was nipped at the
due. Dave Hayes qualified a round
wires by Randall Moung of Pur-
with laps in the 880, while Chuck
Peltz is one of the finalists in the
220 lows.
Nate Adams of Purdue tied Jesse
Owens' Big Ten record in the 220
when he took the race in 21.1 sec-
onds. The time was disallowed,
however, when it was found that
he was helped by a 6%/2 mph wind.
Leps will have a challenge to-
day when he runs the 880. Bill
Frazier of Iowa won his heat of the
880 in a blistering speed of 1:51.9.
Frazier was the indoor champion
of the 600-yd. run in March.
No qualification was required for
the mile and two mile runs, which
will be one of the main features of
this afternoon's action. Other
terday but will be held this aft-
events which were not held yes-
ernoon are the pole vault (Rod
Denhart is the favorite), the shot-
put, and the high jump, in which
Steve Williams is the favorite.

KEN BURNLEY ERGAS LEPS
... in finals .... favored

Golfers Galn Fourth
Place Behind Indiana

MICHIGAN
Jones 2b
Honig ss
Tate rf
Steckley If
'Spalia cf
Merullo c
Campbell lb
Chapman 3b
Fisher p
Totals
NORTHWESTERN
WahlIf1
Snider of
Walberg 2b
ilrtz ss
Blaeser c
Humay p
Calvert lb
Shilling rf
Horwitt 3b
Totals
MICHIGAN 20
Northwestern 00

AB R H RBI
4 0 0 0
2 2 1 0
4000 i
3i 0 0 1
4 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 1 0
30 3 5 0
AB R H RBI
3 1 1 0
4 0 20
30 00
4 00 0 - 05
0 000 001-3 5 2
00 000 001-3 6 1

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I

<:

By JIM BERGER
Special To The Daily
CHAMPAIGN - Tom Pendle-
bury continued his torrid streak
yesterday to keep the Michigan
golf team in contention for the
team title in the 43rd Big Ten
Golf Championships held at the
Illinois golf Course at Savoy.
The Wolverines currently stand
in fourth place, 15 strokes behind
pace-setting Indiana. The remain-
ing 36 holes of the 72-hole tourna-
ment will be played today.
Pendlebury, better known for his
feats in the hockey rink during the
winter season, is the man respon-
sible for Michigan's position. The
junior from Windsor, Ontario,
carded a one over par 73 in the
morning round and came back in
the afternoon with a 3-under 69.
This was the first time this sea-

BIG TEN MEETINGS:
Endorse Federations
In Opposition to AAU

son any Michigan golfer has brok-
en 70.
Pendlebury stands in second
place in the individual race eb-
hind Purdue's Steve Wilkinson.
Wilkinson is 5 under par with a
69-70-139.
If there is another reason why
Michigan is still in the race, it is
Chuck Newton. After a shaky
morning round of 82, high for
Michigan, the junior from Ann
Arbor came back with a 73. New-
ton was 2 under par going into the
34th hole but three straight bogies
raised his score.
Sophomores Dave Cameron and
Gary Mouw both came through in
the morning round with 75's but
couldn't keep up the pace. Camer-
on shot an 81 in the afternoon
while Mouw scored an 80.
Probably the biggest disappoint-
ment of the day for Michigan was
the performance of Captain Bill
Newcomb. Newcomb had a 77-
80-157 for the day. Another sen-
ior, Tom Ahern, did a respectable
job yesterday with two rounds of
78.
Sizzling Nine
One of the most amazing per-
formances of the day was scored
by Northwestern junior Bruce
Payne. Payne shot a high 44 on
the first nine and his coach Sid
Richardson wanted to withdraw
him from the morning contention
since, under the rules, the high-
man score for each team for each
round is not counted. Richardson
conceded that Payne would be his
highest player and wanted to rest
him for the afternoon round.
However, the rules committee
would, not allow this to be done.
Payne proceeded to shoot a course
record 31 on the second nine for a
75.
TEAM SCORES

E-Honig, Chapman, Calvert 3.
2B-Steckley, Fisher, Walberg, Cal-
vert. PB-Merullo. SF-Spalla, Blae-
ser. DP - Honig-Jones-Campbell,
Fisher - Honig - Campbell. LOB -
Michigan 4, Northwestern 5. T-
2:02.
PITCHING SUMMARIES
IP H R ER BB SO WP
Fisher (W) 9 6 2 1 3 5 1
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Clevelanda
Minnesota
New York
Baltimore
Chicago
Los Angeles
Detroit
Boston
Kansas City
Washington

W L
19 11
20 13
18 12
17 14
18 16
15 15
13 16
13 17
14 20
8 21

Pct.
.633
.606
.600
.548
.529
.500
.448
.433
.412
.276

GB
1
22
3
4
5-A
6
7
10

SCHOLARSHIPS:
SALARY:
SEE BRITAIN:

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16-$500 Scholarships
Can earn in excess of $150 per week
Guaranteed $98 per week
Win an oil-expense paid holiday in
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By DAVE GOOD
Special To The Daily
LAFAYETTE - The Big Ten
athletic directors and faculty rep-
presentatives booted the Amateur
Athletic Union a step farther
down the road to oblivion here
yesterday.
Meeting behind closed doors,
the conference policy makers de-
cided to offer what Commissioner
Bill Reed termed, 'strong endorse-
ment for the growing federation
which is trying to unseat the AAU
as the ruling body of amateur
sports in this country.
Reed explained that the ad-j
ministrators resolved to "prepare
recommendations for revisions of
rules and regulations which would
further implement support of fed-
erations.
He pointed out that the likely
outcome of this would be to "con-
fine all term-time participation by
students to events which have
been sanctioned by the federa-
tion."
Although Reed emphasized that
the AAU was not specifically men-

tioned, he admitted that unless the
AAU decides to throw in with the
federation, movement, the resolu-
tions would amount to an enforced
boycott of all AAU competitions
by Big Ten athletes.
Right now the AAU exercises
absolute control over all these fac-
tions. It is the aim of the federa-
tion to subordinate the AAU's
power so that it would control only
the clubs but the AAU so far has
refused to yield its position.
In the only other action taken
yesterday Reed announced 1) that
Professor Frank Remington of
Wisconsin has been named to suc-
ceed John Mee on the four-man
Rose Bowl committee; 2) that the
commissioners Chicago office will
be moved on July first to the Sher-
aton Cadillac hotel after a four-
teen year stay at the La Salle
hotel; 3) that "we, (Big Ten) are
most pleased to have received this
response - a proposed contract
from the big five on Thursday -
to our desires to have a Rose Bowl
renewal.

FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 3, Kansas City 2 (n)
Minnesota 4, New York 3 (n)
Cleveland 9, Detroit 2 (n)
Los Angeles 8, Boston 4 (n)
Baltimore 7, Chicago 4 (n, 12 inn.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Minnesota at New York
Baltimore at Chicago
Kansas City at Washington
Los Angeles at Boston
Detroit at Cleveland
NATIONAL LEAGUE

San Francisco
Los Angeles
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Philadelphia
Houston
New York
Chicago

W
26
23
19
19
16
16
14
12
9
10

L
10
23
13
14
16
18
17
21
19
23

Pct.
.726
.644
.597
.576
.500
.471
.452
.361
.321
.303

GB
3
5
6
8q4
9x
10
132
1i

Indiana
Purdue
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan State
Northwestern
Iowa
Ohio State

373-370-743
376-369-745
380-37 0-750
378-380-758
379-381-760
384-382-766
381-387-768
375-393-768
385-384-769
384-393-777

INDIVIDUAL 'M' SCORES

LAST NIGHT'R RESULTS
Chicago 11, Philadelphia 8 (n)
Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 1 (n)
Milwaukee 5, New York 2 (n)
St. Louis 8, Los Angeles 3 (n)
Houston 3, San Francisco 2 (n, 10inn.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Houston at San Francisco
St. Louis at Los Angeles (n)
New York at Milwaukee
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Philadelphia

Those students who qualify may continue their association next
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For interview call College Director
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Gary Mouw
Dave Cameron
Tor nAhern
Bill Newcomb

73-69-142
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