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May 18, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- sm

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRMIAY, MAY 18, 196?.

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAIlY FRIDAY, MAY 18,1962

Netmen Lead Northwestern by

Three

LEADING IRISH 2-0:
3M' Nine Rained Out of Lead

v-

By MIKE BLOCK
Special To The Daily
SOUTH BEND - Michigan's
Wolverines suffered their first
rainout of the regular season here
yesterday as their game with No-
tre Dame was called after the third
inning.
Today the team will meet the
Northwestern Wildcats at Evan-
ston, and tomorrow it will travel
to Madison for a doubleheader
with Wisconsin. Fritz Fisher will
handle the pitching chores for
Michigan.
Michigan was leading, 2-0, at
the time, with right-hander Jim
Bobel pitching his best game of
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the year, before a sudden down-
pour halted the contest.
Michigan's first tally came in
the second inning whencHarvey
Chapman singled to right, and
after two were out, went to third
on a wild pitch and a stolen base.
After Ed Hood walked, Chapman
scored on a passed ball by Walter
Osgood.
Score. Again
The Wolverines other run came
in the third as a result of two hit
batsmen by Irish hurler Phil Don-
nelly. He first hit Jim Newman,
then after fanning Dick Post, he
moved Newman to second by
downing Jim Steckley. Newman
took third on Chapman's long
fly and scored on Donnelly's sec-
ond wild pitch.
In the fourth, the rains came
with Dave Campbell on first base
with two outs. Campbell had beat-
en out a bunt for Michigan's sec-
ond hit.
In the three inning which he
worked, Bobel gave up two hits
and no walks. He was often ahead
of the batters and looked strong
in spite of the 90-degree heat.
Three Given Rest
Coach Dori Lund gave three of
his regulars the day off yesterday.
Shortstop Dick Honig, who has
been sidelined by a leg injury, has
recovered but was kept on the
bench to play it safe. Outfielders.
Ron Tate and Dennis Spalla also
sat it out as Post and Hood re-
placed them.

The rain spoiled the inaugura-
tion of new Cartier Field at Notre
Dame. Pre-game ceremonies, in-
cluding Notre Dame's marching
band, highlighted the festivities.
Nab Molinas
As Leader
Of Fix Ring
NEW YORK (P)-The baseball
"fix" scandals flared anew yes-
terday with the arrest of Jack Mo-
linas, 30, former Columbia Univer-
sity star, on charges of heading a
"ring" that corrupted college
games.
The alleged conspiracy involved
22 players at 12 colleges, in an
attempt to fix 25 contests.
Molinas, an attorney, played
professionally for a time after his
college career but then was barred
by the National Basketball Asso-
ciation.
He pleaded innocent in general
sessions and was released in $5,000
bail. No trial date was set.
Molinas was arrested in the of-
fice of Manhattan Dist. Atty.
Frank S. Hogan on a five-count
indictment.
Three charged bribery in pay-
ments of $1,000 to William Dennis'
(Bill) Reed, 21, of New York, who
played with the Bowling Green,
Ohio, University team.
He also was charged with sub-
ornation of perjury in connection
with Reed's testimony before a
grand jury and with conspiracy.

By TOM ROWLAND
Special To The Daily
MINNEAPOLIS - Michigan
broke ahead of the Big Ten net
pack here yesterday by virtue of
a three point lead over second
place Northwestern.
The defending conference
champs, who were out to make
it four straightconference titles,
finished the first day of com-
petition in the Big Ten meet with
27 points. Following were North-
western with 24, and Michigan
State, Illinois ard Iowa, all tied
for third with 14.
Ray Senkowski, who was de-
fend Big Ten singles champion
and runner-up in the NCAA tourn-
ament last year, advanced to the
semifinals along with four other
Wolverine singles netmen. Sen-
kowski defeated Illinois' Tom
Boatman in a preliminary match,
8-6, 7-5. In the first round, the
big man for Michigan tripped
Indiana's Glary Baxter, 6-1, 7-5.
Tomorrow Senkowski takes on
Steve Wilkinson, who earlier in the
day took one set, while losing two,
to Northwestern's Marty Riessen;
figured to be Senkowski's match
in the finals.
Wolverin Harry Fauquier, ad-
vanced to the semifinals after

crushing Dlan Zawacki, 6-0, 6-1.
Third man on the ladder, Gerry
Dubie, took a 6-4, 6-3, measure
of Jerry Olesky of Illinois.
The Wolverines gained more
points on Jim Tenney's 6-2,.6-2,
win over Badger Tom Rideagh.
The only Michigan player to drop
out of singles play was Tom
Beach, who fell 6-1, 6-3, to Carver
Blanchard.
In doubles play, Senkowski and
Fauquier took a 6-4, 6-4, win from
Purdue's Tom Helft-Jerry Taulls
duo. The Wolverines first double
pair had to come from behind in
the second set, after being down
4-1.
Duble and Tenney defeated Bob
Graham and Bill Samo, 6-3, 7-5.
In number three doubles, Mlchi-
gan's Tom Beach and Ron Linclau
took vengence on Michigan State's
Bill Lau and Tom Jameison for
an earlier defeat this year, knock-
ing the Spartan pair, 7-5, 3-6, 6-2.
After a half hour's rest, Linclau
and Beach met the first seeded
doubles team from Ohio State and
handily downed Roger Mitchell
and Hal Smith, 6-2, 8-6.
Today will mark the second day
of the tournament; final action
being tomorrow.

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h.A

SPORTS SHORTS:
Ea gles Sign Grandelius;
Ponder Minors' Change

i ---

By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - The Phila-
delphia Eagles of the National
Football League announced yes-
terday the signing of Everett
(Sonny) Grandelius, r e C e n t 1 y
dropped by Colorado in a recruit-
ment dispute, as offensive back-
field coach.
Grandelius, former Michigan
State star played pro football with
the New York Giants.

THE CONFERENCE ON THE UNIVERSITY
... ringing together 165 students, faculty, and administrators
for a two-day examination of the problems and prospects
of the University of Michigan.
TCNICHT:

TWIST !
TONIGHT
WITH THE AMBLERS
at the
LITTLE CLUB
UNDER THE STARS.
*
FRIDAY, MAY 18
UNION MALL

In three years at Colorado,
Grandelius' teams won 20 and lost
9, and last year captured the Big
Eight Conference title for the first
time and played in the Orange
Bowl at Miami.
NEW YORK -- A new player
development program that would
involve realignment and reclassi-
fication of the minor4 will be con-
sidered tomorrow by baseball's
major lagues at their special joint
meeting.
Commissioner Ford Frick called
the meeting to consider the re-
port of the major-minor commit-
tee that has been working on. the
problem for over a year. If the re-
port is approved, it is expected to
take the form of a broad general
outline with details to be filed in
later.
Would Start In '63
The new program would start
in 1963 with 1965 as a target date
for its completion.
Although details have not been
announced, it was understood that
tentative plans call for each of the
20 big league teams to run five
or six minor league farms, making
definite financial commitments to
assure each club's operation.
Under the proposed program,
the six classes of minor league ball
would be cut to three. They prob-
ably would be Triple A, Double
A and Class A, eliminating such
labels as class B, C and D. How-
ever, many cities now in B, C, or
D would be involved inthe new
program.
FRANKFURT, Germany -Willi
Duame, president of the West Ger-
man Olympic Committee, indicat-
ed yesterday he will seek to have
separate East and West German
Olympic teams.
The move surprised the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee.

A

i

7:30-Registration, Union Ballroom, Delegates will

receive

room

01

assignments and pay registration fee if they have not done so
already.
8:00-KEYNOTE SPEECH: Union Ballroom
"The University as an Elite Institution"
-Prof. Arthur Eastman, Department of English
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
9:00-Discussion groups
SATURDAY:
Conference begins at 9:30 A.M. in Third Floor Rooms of the Union,
and runs all day.
Discussion groups-a luncheon-speeches.
SUNDAY:
"Challenge" and the Conference on the University present
CHRISTOPHER JENCKS, Managing Editor of The New Republic

8-12

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