100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 13, 1962 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E.

TTHE MICHIGAN DAILY S
Ui

JNDAY, MAY 13, 1962

AUTO ACCIDENT STUDY:
Measure Human Endurance

By MICHAEL JULIAR
A study to determine the tol-
erance of the human body to dif-
ferent types of forces in auto-
mobile. accidents is now being con-
ducted by a University doctor and
three associates from Wayne State
University.
Working with the Ford Motor
Company, Prof. F. Gaynor Evans
of the department of anatomy,
Dr. E. S. Gurdjian of Wayne
State's neurology department,
Prof. Gerbert A. Lissner and Prof.
Lawrence Patrick, chairman and
member respectively of Wayne
State's engineering mechanics de-
partment are gathering data on
how much force the human body
can stand.
"All physical injuries result from
absorption of energy," Evans says.
"The magnitude of the energy and
the time in which it is- absorbed
are equally important.
Foam Rubber Not Good
He notes that the longer the'
period of energy absorption, the
more energy that can be toleratedr
without injury. Also, what the body
hits is important. '
The material the object is made
of and its shape determine the in-1
jury the individual will receive,
Evans says. "Contrary to popularl
belief, foam rubber is not a good1
material to hit because you re-7
bound from it too easily and not
enough energy is absorbed." 1
"The human scalp, because of
its hair and soft tissue, is a veryF
good energy absorber," He points
out.
Evans strongly favors the use
of seat belts. He gave one vivid
example of an automobile pas-
senger who died when ejected froml
a slow moving car that had skid-
ded onto the road's shoulder.
"If that person had worn a seat-t
belt, he probably wouldn't have#
been killed," he declares.
Evans says that the best typeE
of seat belt is one that is rapped
around the waist with an ad-z
ditional one across the chest.
Need Public Education
He felt that it is "a matter oft
public education" to get people to
use seat belts. Since most acci-
dents happen at a speed less thant
45 miles-per-hour, seat belts can
do much in preventing injury, he
says.s
"They are used most often, by1
people that own them, on long

Cite Quality
Of Medicine
In England
"The quality and adequacy of
medical care have improved un-
der the British Health Program,"
Prof. Almont Lindsey of the Uni-
versity of Virginia said Friday at
a conference on the Economics of
Health Care.
"The physician in Britain is far
more effective clinically because
he can minister to all patients,
irrespective of their economic stat-
us, and he can give them whatever
treatment is required," Lindsey
said.
Pointing to the high salaries
presently earned by medical doc-
tors, Prof. W. Lee Hansen of the
University of Chicago economics
department called federal aid to
medical students unnecessary.
"The levels of income received
by physicians more than compen-
sate" for the rising costs of medi-
cal and pre-medical training, Prof.
Hansen said.
"Federal subsidies to medical
students will only make medicine
an even more profitable career
than it already is," he added.

Bird's Eye

View of Campus

CRASH - Automobile accidents place great strains on the human
body. Scientists can determine the limits of body tolerance.

trips, but many accidents happen
on the way to the corner drug
store, for example," he notes.
Most people hurt in automobile
accidents are those next to the
driver. "Apparently, the driver has
something to grab onto, and the
steering wheel cages him in to
some effect. But his companion
doesn't have anythnig to grab
onto," Evans says.
Mandatory Seat Belts
Automobile companies have im-
proved their cars with better
brakes, lights and locks, he notes.
But he would like to see some-
thing don'e about making seat
belts mandatory on all cars. Wis-
consin is the only state with such
a law.
Two other faculty members are
also working in the same basic
area. Prof. Donald F. Huelke of the
anatomy department and Dr.- Paul
W. Gikas of the pathology de-
partment are seeking detailed in-
formation on the causes of death
in automobile accidents and por-
tions of the vehicles which deliver-
ed the fatal impacts.
Working in cooperation with law
enforcement agencies they will be
on call day and night to make im-
medicate examination of any auto
accident involving an on-the-
scene fatality in Washtenaw
County highways.
Studies Misleading
During the past eight months,
the researchers have studied some.
20 fatal accidents.
"We have found that some junk-
yard studies have proved mis-
leading," Prof. Huelke says.
"Often the car has had addi-

tional damage during transport
away from the accident scene.
This has given us a number of
false clues and has sometimes con-
cealed the true death-dealing in-
struments," he continues.
The investigators believe first-
hand observations and judgments,
made before the victim and his
vehicle are moved, will yield more
accurate data on the causes of
death.

LOOK OUT BELOW-From the top of Maynard House, the view includes Betsy Barbour, Helen Newberry, the Kelsey Museum, the
Administration Bldg. and Angell Hall, while the University High School floats in a sea of tree tops.

[F; ..iI

Fast Service

- Advantageous Rates

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
in jobs in 78 countries. Prof. Coleman
will answer questions concerning cur-
riculum, admission requirements, fees,
etc.
THURS., MAY 17-
Commission on Professional & Hospi-
tal Activities, Ann Arbor, Mich. (p.m.
only)-Men & Women interested in
building career with national medical
research }, organization. Commission
makes studies, compiles data, & prepares
reports & papers for private & gov't.
organizations. Consider persons of all
educ. bkgds. for positions in research;
elec. computer prog.; stat.; med. classi-
fication; admin.; editing; mgmt./trng.;
techsswriting. Exper. helpful but not
necessary. Will train.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Abraham & Straus, New York-Exec.
Trng. Prog. for men with military com-
pletted Bkgd. in Bus. Ad., Lib'l Arts,
Indust. Engrg., Acc't., & Marketing.
Prog. leads to immed. positions in
Buying, Operations, Sales Mgmt.fi Re-
search, Control, Finance & Acc't.
Toledo Metropolitan Housing Author-
ity, Toledo, Ohio-Community Services
Coordinator. Preferably MA in social
work. At least 3 yrs. exper. in social or
group work or related fields. Prefer
-ages 30-45..-
Rome Air Develop. Center., Griffiss
Air Force Base, New York-Human Eng.
Lab. has immed. requirement fo" 2
Physiological & Experimental Psycholo-
gists. Require special trng. in field of
experimental Psych, with formal educ.
of MA.
Crown Zellerbach Corp., Western,
Waxide Div., Hazelwood, Mo.-Jr. In-
dustrial Engnr. for recent or June
grad. Also continuing need for profes-
sional people partic. engnrs., and other
college trained people. Co. is national
paper mfg. concern. Located on out-
skirts of St. Louis.
Miles Laboratories, Inc., Elkhart, Ind.
-Openings for Lab. Technicians with

possibly 1 or 2 yrs. of college. Prefer
people who have been majoring in the
sciences. Require some bkgd. in Chem.
Scott, Foresman & Co., Chicago, III.-
Need 2 copywriters in high sch. section
of advertising dept. (1) in areas of jr.-
sr. high sch. social studies & science.
BA with bkgd. in social sci. & general
sci. (2) area of high sch. Latin. BA:
bkgd. in the classics. Both require 2 or
3 yrs. in teaching, writing for educ.
publ., journalism, or adv. Age 25-35.
Vernitron Corp., Torrance, Calif. -
Electrical Engnrs. in June '62 or Jan.
'63 graduating class. For design & de-
velopment of rotating electro-magnetic
components for both commercial & mil-
itary applications.
*. * *
Please call General Div., Bureau of
Appts.,3200 SAB, Ext. 3544 for further
information.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Cong. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, Dis-
cussion: "Art & Responsibility of the
Artist-Literature," May 13, 7:30 p.m., 802
Monroe.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stud. Club,
Dinner, 1 p.m., Parents' Day Program,
Vespers, 2:15 p.m., May 13, 1511 Washte-
naw.
* * *
Lutheran Stud. Assoc., Supper honor-
ing the seniors, May 13, 5 p.m., Hill &
Forest.
* * *
U. of M. Folk Dancers, Meeting, In-
struction, Dancing, May 15, 7:30 p.m.,
1429 Hill.
* * *
Wesley Fellowship, Meet to attend
"Question Seven," May 13, 6:45 p.m.,
Wesley Lounge.

INDIAN - PAKISTAN
All Far Eastern currencies
Specialists in Foreign Exchange
here and abroad
Consult US:
DEAK & CO. (TIMES SQUARE) INC.
1480 Broadway - New York 36, N.Y.
The largest foreign exchange organization
"tin the Western Hemisphere"
Once Again - The Famous TCE
EUROPEAN STUDENT TOUR
u-e etures:
The fabuour that includes manyunq
S live several days with a French family -- eranmn
abroad, special cultural t~ecaeeig e yCeptions~nmete
Travel By Deluxe Motor Coach
SUMMER
1962 53 Days in Europe $6251 INCLsVE
Transatlantic Transportation Additional
",'T TRAVEL & CULTURAL EXCHANGE, INC. WV'
501 Fifth Ave. . New York 17, N.Y. " OX 7-4129 f'sc'

GRECIAN FACADE-Partically hidden by tree branches and shadows Angell
Hall becomes part of an Ann Arbor Acropolis.

WILKINSON'S
.STURDY TRUNKS...
for travel or storage

4..

. "r,,yrY.tibi:{i{ti<i¢"i: Y.4::iv "r:":":":"%:":'"}.q",.}.:v :::":":Ct{;:{"::"::4r::?tiaAi:"R49?:i:" : ":"": SL:vb :t4a.}:v::.:"ro"."a..v::v ::"::."r."...".": r.":.".":: ".: o:":
". "«": "" .. r: r r"1"Y":">""""..".h:......".".""""""""""""""""".""".."""""v "rr":r"1:::.r.......X.":.:r:l.'.::ti"::r:t:NR'.'.1'.':..".r..:".""Y"1"rr:r."r rr: J

.- 1

.1

SELL!
SELL
SELLI
SELLI
SELL!
YoUR
BOOKS
BACK

Keep clothing and personal belongings se-
cure in storage or on long trips. There's a
size to fit any need in our trunk stock.
Steel Covered Was 9.95 NOW $795
i nlrinCKRSv1bx1

e

Fiber Covered
s LOCKERS

31x17x13

s1095

(plus tax)
* Other Trunks from $12.95-$75.OO
Available in all sizes
No Charge For Initials

AT THE TONE-Burton Tower sticks up behind Hill Aud. with the plant department chimnies, the
hospital and the Hill in the background..

NOW HERE THIS-The WUOM
transmitter beams from atop the
administration bldg.

i

I

3 Easy Ways to Shop-Charge-Lay-away or Convenient
$1.00 weekly budget plan

I

I

...

-I:

$:$f . : ii _::::4:i i: is->:v:.:v."?i'.Si' ::........:.. v:::.:. " 9 i': ".i { it? }:;Y : r:..::. :r :. ": :.
.1c }':
" :. ;': '...w. .3c. dS, :r .. '. k.";: ......... 3 . ;:. 1rwd Ntc a wai - -:::,.._ ' .... .. ... . ao

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan