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February 15, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

V USDAT

THE MICHIAN .A..........Y

a.., ,

At the 19th Hole
with Fred Steinhardt
The Weak Link: Part One
(This is the first of a two-part series dealing with the sorry
state of Michigan basketball. Today, the Field House and re-
cruiting.)
SEWCOMERS TO MICHIGAN quickly discover that this is a school
bound by tradition. The law quad reeks with it. Don't step on the
v. No women in the Union poolroom. Michigan sports are also bound
y tradition. Did you ever walk around looking at the pictures in the
nion poolroom? "1895 Michigan vs. Chicago," "1947 Rose Bowl, UM
), USC 0." You can almost feel tradition reach out and touch you at
Michigan-Ohio State football game.
There are desirable traditions and undesirable traditions. For
cample, segregation is an undesirable tradition. A P-Bell party is a
Wfrable tradition.
Which is all a long-winded way of introducing my topic for
these next two days: Michigan basketball, an undesirable tradi-
tion. This last Monday, tradition in the guise of Ohio State
reached out to hand Michigan its 30th Big Ten loss in 34 games.
Suffice to say, basketball at Michigan is in bad shape and has
been for years.
I feel that the deplorable basketball situation at Michigan is due
>;the traditional policies on the sport which are sorely in need of
pdating. This may have been said before, but if so, it has not been
id enough and will not be said enough until someone or something
rods the responsible people into giving basketball the support it de-
rves. ,
Several problems must be overcome if Michigan is ever to attain
ny measure of basketball respectability. The handling of these prob-
ms in the past has often meen misguided and has not at all im-
roved the situation.
"he Root of all Evil...
E ROOT OF ALL EVIL is that singularly ugly abortion known
as Yost Field House. Because of it, fans don't like to see games,
recluding any possibility of charging for admission as a source of
adly needed revenue) and promising players often take one look
ad enroll elsewhere.
Back in 1925 the Field House was considered the best of its kind.
ut anyone who says it is adequate today either has rocks in his head
r a stiff bet that it will outlast the Rockc of Gibraltar. Unfortunately,
ader present policies, it just might. Supporters of the present field
Ouse would be consistent in their personal lives only if they took
ans-continental flights in a single engine, open-air plane. I say this
ecause in the last decade, the University has shelled out $1,790,034.07
r a new pressbox, athletic administration building, and varsity swim-
ing pool.
There has got to be a screw loose somewhere in this policy.
Can anyone honestly say that any of these new structures was
needed as badly as a new field house? I have nothing against
Gus Stager and as a reporter I certainly applaud a new pressbox.
I further admit that the old administration building was inade-
quate, but they don't have to PLAY A SPORT, DRAW SPECTA-
TORS, OR DRAW PROSPECTIVE ATHLETES an at aduninistra-
tion building or a pressbox. How many gridders picked Michigan
over Michigan State immediately after being awestrickenat the
sight of our new pressbox? (I haven't asked my Daily associates
how the new pressbox influenced their choice.)
Cn any of these new plants be expected to pay for itself as much
f a field house could? It would seem that this would be more than
minor consideration to an athletic department reportedly pinching
ennies for years.
Has anybody ever stopped to wonder WHY football carries the
mtire bu'dget? At other schools, basketball more than pays for itself.
eighboring Detroit parlayed an exciting brand of basketball, a 75c
harge per ID card, and a pleasant 9,000 seat field house to take in
,000 a game for 16 games last year, With a $1.50 general admission,
fis figures out to something like $100,000 taken in. Michigan drew
1,600 for 12 home games, mostly ID bearers admitted free.
Does the Field House really discourage players? This has never
een proven, but it might be interesting to ask three or four of the
est players on Illinois' crack freshman team Who are looking for-
ard to competing next year in the brand new field house in Cham-
algn.:
almost' is not Enough ...
HICH BRINGS US AROUND to recruiting, Michigan always seems
to come in second. Think of the players who "almost" came to
[icliigan, like Jerry Lucas or Rod Thorn. Oscar Robertson was even
uoted in a magazine article as saying that "if I had to do it all over
gain, I suppose I would go to Michigan." Unfortunately, he doesn't.
Of the last four Michigan high school coaches' All-State teams,
Wo Class A (Larry Tregonning, Doug Herner), two Class B (Scott
[aentz, Jim Ludwig), and two Class C players (John Oosterbaan,
)oug Greenwold) have come to Michigan. That is six out of 80. In
he same period, nine out of 19 Class A All-Staters have gone to
Vestern Michigan and Detroit.
As bad as six out of 80 sounds, the real situation is far worse. It
as always been a peculiar characteristic of Michigan high school
asketball to produce few really topflight individuals in an overall
ftting of second-rate competition. In the last four years, Michigan

as produced a mere six players-Dave DeBusschere, Pete Gent,
'harlie North, Chet Walker, Reggie Harding, and Bill Chmielewski-
ho would have safely made an Indiana or Illinois all-state team. (De-
usschere, Harding, and Chmielewski were high school all-America.)
If you were to guess how many of these six came to Michi-
gan, any guess' over zero would be wrong. Admittedly, Walker,
Harding, and North simply could not have been scholastically
admissible, and here lies a basic problem. But this is all the more
reason to redouble efforts on boys who do meet requirements,
such as DeBusschere, Gent, or Chmielewski.
To revive a few memories, Gent scored 22 points and grabbed 17
ebounds for Michigan State in the Spartan's 80-74 victory here last
ionth. DeBusschere, clearly Michigan's greatest high school per-
ormer, will be remembered as the finest collegiate player ever for any
Michigan team. The 6'10" Chmielewski is currently Dayton's second
eading scorer and leading rebounder as a soph.
The last Michigan high school players approaching the skill of
hese three who came to Michigan were M. C. Burton and George
ee. They were recruited in 1955, seven long years ago.
* * * *
(TOMORROW-1) A revelation, 2) present situation and
future prospects.)

Renfrew: Knows How To Win

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is an-
other in the Daily's series on the
greatest moments of Michigan's
varsity coaches. Today's story is
written by Michigan's hockey coach,
Al Renfrew.)
By AL RENFREW
As Told to Jim Berger
Thinking back, I'd have to say
that I've had two pretty memor-
able moments as a player.
The first one that comes to
mind was when Michigan beat
Minnesota to go to the first Na-
tional Collegiate tournament. They
had a really good team that year.

We had played them twice al-
ready that year in Minneapolis
and we defeated them both times.
In this game we had the home
ice advantage. As it turned out we
won the game easily and it was
my most productive game. I scored
four goals and an assist. We won,
6-2. It was the clinching tilt send-
ing us to the playoffs.
Overtime Win
'We also won the playoffs, beat-
ing Boston College 6-4 in overtime
for the first win, and we took
the finals by beating Dartmouth,
8-4. I remember in the first game
Boston College tied it up with a
goal with about 10 seconds left.
They pulled their goalie with a
minute left. The overtimes were
set at 10 minutes then, and there
wasn't any sudden death rule.
The other one that stands out
in my mind was during the next
year when we took our first West-
ern trip. This was during my
fourth year. We had four years of
eligibility then.
Win Streak at Stake
Anyway, We had a 17 or 18
game winning streak over the past
two seasons when we went out to
play Colorado College. They were a
really good team that year and
SAE, PDT,
Sig Eps Win
In A' Action
By STAN KUKLA
The "A" fraternity basketball
teams saw a full slate of action
tonight and, in spite of several
valiant efforts by underdogs, the
favored teams proved victorious.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon won by
forfeit over Kappa Alpha Psi. In
other action on the boards, Sigma
Phi Epsilon had a harder time
than SAE; playing and whipping
Acacia, 57 to 11.
Phi Delta Theta once again
showed its power by downing Delta
Chi. Delta Chi scored its only
basket late in the first half. The
Phi Delts, aided by a balanced
'scoring attack plus a 23-point
out-put by Joe Nameth, managed
to role up a score of 71 points to
the loser's pair.
SCORES
Delta Tau Delta 61. Phi Kappa Tau 18
Lambda Chi Alpha 56, Zeta Psi 17
Zeta Beta Tau 32, Trigon 27
Sigma Nu 55, Tau Epsilon Phi 21
Phi Kappa Phi 57, Phi Kappa Sigma 18
Phi Sigma Kappa 39, Kappa Sigma 29
Tau Delta Chi 41, Alpha Epsilon Pi 35
Theta Chi 38, Alpha Kappa Lambda 33
Beta Theta Pi 44, Phi Epsilon Phi 38
Chii Psi 49, Phi Sigma Delta 19
Delta Upsilon 43, Delta Signa Phi 22
Alpha Delta.Phi 38, Tau Delta Phi 36

they had a pretty good streak go-
ing too.
I remember the date of the se-
ries was Dec. 21 because it was
my birthday. That night I scored
three goals and we won, 5-2. The
next night we tied 4-4 but I scored
the tying goal with eight seconds
left.
I'd have to say that that was,
my greatest series and those two
events were my greatest as a play-
er.
As a coach, I'd have to say that
my greatest experience was up at
Michigan Tech. I coached there
for five years. Then I coached
North Dakota a year and then
came to Michigan.
When I came to Tech they had
nothing. My first season there, the
team had a 2-18 record. I really
had to start from scratch. Well,
it was a real job building them up,
but we got better each yerar.
In the fifth year, I finally had
"Keep A-Head
of your Hair"
We specialize in
" PERSONALITY CUTS
" CREW-CUTS
" FLAT TOPS
" PRINCETONS
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near Michigan Theatre

a good team and when they got
into the NCAA championships, I'd
have to say that was my most
memorable moment as a coach.
Tech lost the playoffs. We were
beaten by Michigan, 7-5. It was a
tough game. I remember our goal-
ie had 28 saves compared with
the Michigan goalie's 40.
But the fact that the team
started with nothing and had
gone so far will have to go as my
number one coaching experience.
College Cage
Navy 77, Rutgers 50
Amhert 75, Army 58
No. Car. State 85, No. Car. 57.
Miami (O) 75, Pitt 72
Air Force 75, Colorado College 44
Xavier 79, Louisville 67
Western Mich. 69, Toledo 64
Eastern Mich. 80, Albion 73
Kalamazoo 71, Aquinas 58
Assumption (Ont) 73, Adrian 59
TRAVEL SERVICE
12 NICKELS ARCADE
NO 3-8597

the
toe
is0
TAPERED

*R "
the
label ,
is
BLUE

and the shoe is U. S. KEDS
Get that slim, tapered toe and "that great
Keds feeling;" Pick yourself a pair of our
fresh, new Keds-in new 1962 colors-Nar-
row and Medium widths.
Ju C C. -W
TAPER-TOE
CHAMPION in classic
canvas
$479

CAMPUS'BOOTER
304 south Stote

AL RENFREW,
... winning coach

I

NBA Standings
EASTERN DIVISION

Boston
Philadelphia
Syracuse
New York
WESTERN
x-Los Angeles
Cincinnati
Detroit
s-St. Louis
Chicago

W L Pct. GB
45 17 .725 -
41 34 .627 5%a
30 32 .484 15
23 39 .382 22
DIVISION
W L Pct. GB
43 20 .683 -
33 31 .519 10 f
29 33 .47813%
23 39 .371 19YA
14 46 .242 27Y

LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
New York 125, Boston 112
Chicagor125, Cincinnati 121
Detroit 119, Philadelphia 110
x-St. Louis at Los Angeles (inc.)

NHL Standings
W L T Pts. GF
Montreal 31 10 11 73.173
Toronto 28 17 8 64 175
Chicago 23 19 13 59 159
New York 20 25 9 49 150
Detroit 18 24 11 47 144
Boston 12 37 6 30 143
LAST/NIGHT'S RESULT
Chicago 4, New York 3

GA
119
138
142
162
163
240

3 MORE DAYS
OF OUTSTANDING
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ON
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