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May 10, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-10

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

Senate Defeats Effort
To Suspend Discussion

n iteracy
FRENCH CRACKDOWN:
Algerian Premier Warr
Against Aiding Terrori
By The Associated Press
TUNIS-Premier Ben Youssef Ben Khedda of the Algeria
visional government warned yesterday that Europeans in Alger
support the Secret Army are jeopardizing their own future.
At the same time, deportations, city-wide searches and tot
fews in sealed-off areas were decreed by authorities in a nev
to stamp out the European Secret Army terror in Algiers and C
Ben Khedda, who eventually would rule over an independ
geria, coupled his warning in a widely heralded radio broadcast
charge that the Secret Arm

HUAC Views
Pa phleteer
WASHINGTON M)--The House
Committee on Un-American Activ-
ities said yesterday an American
publisher has been paid more tian
$240,000 by the Soviet embassy for
printing nearly three-quarters of
a million Soviet books and pam-
phlets.
The payments were made since
September 1959 to Crosscurrents
Press, Inc., of New York. Its presi-
dent, Myron E. Sharpe, cited the
Fifth' Amendment more than 100
times in declining to answer com-
mittee questions about his opera-
tions.
Committee counsel John C.
Walsh said "99 per cent of all the
pamphlets published by Crosscur-
rents Press were sold to the Soviet
embassy in Washington which has
one of these bulk rates for dis-
tribution of the material through-
out the country. "
Rep. August E. Johansen (R-
Mich), added that the bulk rate
meant ,a third class mail privilege
"which in effect is subsidized by
American taxpayers."\
The committee counsel produced
Justice Department records show-
ing Sharpe's company was reg-
istered as a foreign agent.
Congressmen- and others have
protested lately when smalltown
libraries and even churches in their
districts received such booklets in
the mail, unsolicited.

ceiving aid from "certain
military authorities.
Place for Merit
"The Europeans have the
in-the Algeria of tomorrow
is up to them to decide
merit it."
Addressing himself, then
geria's nine million Moslem
Khedda cautioned againstv
ly reacting to provocations
"Everywhere we musts
good example of order an
which alone in the present c
stances can demonstrat
strength and our confidence
future," he said.
Fire with Fire
Meanwhile, informed sou
Algiers reported the Fren
ernment is training 800 M
recruited from the Moslem
National Liberation (FL
fight the Secret Army te
with their own tactics.
They would be sent to
and Oran to aid in the crad
These "ultra-Colonialist
Secret Army terrorists are
ing the way for Algerian ind
ence from France, he said.
Extremists in Algeria "da
den many Algerian homes,
plying their systematic dest
and creating ruins."
Swainson Sign
School-age Bil
LANSING-Gov. John B.
son yesterday signed into la
providing that children si
old before Dec. 1 enter sch
previous September, and
birthday is after Dec. 1, t
the' next fall.

Test Bill
Second Try,
1s Anticipated
Ss On Monday
Main Motion Receives
apro -Supr
ia who Strong Floor Support
al cur- WASHINGTON (GP-The Senate
w drive smacked down an effort to limit
Oran. debate on the Kennedy Adminis-
ent Al- tration's voter literacy test bill yes-
with a terday, then gave the bill itself a
,y is re- rousing vote of support.
French Democratic leader Mike Mans-
field of Montana quickly set the
stage for a second try Monday at
ir place shutting off debate, even though
,but it he conceded there was no chance
if they of success.
President John F. Kennedy told
,to Al- his news conference that if the
ns, Ben Senate does not succeed in limit-
violent- ing debate on the bill Monday
"then; of course, there is no use
show a in saying you are for it, because
d calm, it won't ever come up."
circum- The effort to invoke cloture was
e our voted down 53 to 43. failing even
e in the to win a favorable majority. It
needed approval of two thirds of
those voting, or 64 votes.
urces in The second test, forced by
ch gov- Mansfield with a move to table
Ioslem's, the bill, brought a solid endorse-
e Rebel ment with, a 64-33 vote to keep it
N), to alive A vote to table kills a bill.
rrorists Republican leader Everett M.
Dirksen of Illinois said the refusal
Algiers to kill showed that 67 senators
kdown. favored the measure. He -included
s" and three absentees he said favor it.
block- But Dirksen added the Senate
depend- would not vote to limit debate "so
we have no choice but to go on."
ily sad- Mansfield was urged by Sena-
multi- tors Joseph S. Clark (D-Pa) and
ruction Jacob K. Javits (R-NY) to con-
tinue the debate at least through
next week regardless of the vote
Monday.
S But Mansfield said he did "not
anticipate much in the way of
l shifting" of votes from yesterday's
lineup and said he doubted there
Swain- would be much change on the sub-
w a bill ject if the debate continued an-
ix years other week or month or two
tool the months.
if the Senators are traditionally re-
o enter luctant to cut off free debate on
any issue.
Leaders of the Southern talk-
n o fest against the bill said some of
their supporters couldn't be pres-
ent for the vote Monday, but they
still appeared confident the absen-
tees would not make any difference
in the outcome.
4 Late in the day, Clark told the
Senate he regarded the present
struggle as a "dress rehearsal".

States negotiating position and in
to submit any criticisms private-
ly-not in public.
Predicted Failure
Adenauer had been quoted in a
Berlin news conference Monday as
predicting failure for the talks and
denouncing as unworkable the
United States proposal for a 13-
power international authority gov-
erning access to Berlin.
The State Department said Sec-
retary Dean Rusk, due back this
weekend from a two-week global
trip, plans to continue soon there-
after his controversial dicsussions
here with Soviet Ambassador Ana-
toly F. Dobrynin on a peaceful so-
lution to the Berlin crisis.
Kennedy said it was natural for
the Germans to disagree about the
makeup and functions of the pro-
posed international group. But he
denied that the presence of Com-
munist East Germans on it-as en-
visioned in the plan-would mean
recognition of the regime.
Speculation
Informed sources had speculated
that Adenauer was displeased that
the North Atlantic Treaty Orga-
nization took no action about cre-
ating an independent NATO nu-
clear force, and was taking this
means to show that Kennedy's ad-
ministration cannot lightly disre-
gard his wishes. Adenauer strongly
favors an independent nuclear
force.
West German Press Chief Felix
von Eckhardt said, however, that
Adenauer's remarks were not re-
ported fully enough to give the cor-
rect impression.
Incumbents
Win Contests
In Primaries
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Incumbents
won the day- in Tuesday's primar-
ies in five states.
Candidates were picked for Sen-
ate seats in Florida and Ohio, gov-
ernorships in Ohio and New Mex-
ico and 54 House seats in those
states and Indiana and West Vir-
ginia.
In Florida, Sen. George A.
Smathers easily won renomination
In Ohio, Gov. Michael V. Di-
Salle won Democratic renomina-
tion after a hot fight with Atty.
Gen. Mark, McElroy. Democratic
Sen. Frank J. Lausche also tri-
umphed, as did Robert Taft, Jr.,
in his race for congressman-at-
large.

To Press Negotiation
Despite German Ire
Kennedy Admits Talks Might Fail,
Smoothes Over Adenauer Remark
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John F. Kennedy said yesterday the
United States-Soviet talks on Berlin may fail, but this country will
continue them despite criticism from Germany because "the effort
is worth it" to avoid war.
Kennedy, at a news conference, stepped determinedly into the
furor over West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer's remarks
about the talks in obvious attempt to smooth over Allied differences.
But the President voiced concern over damage done to the United

effect he admonished Adenauer

U.S., Soviets
Hold Meeting
About Laos
BULLETIN
VIENTIANE (M) - Prince
Souvanna Phouma has or-
dered pro-Communist Prince
Souphanouvong towithdraw
his Pathet Lao troops from
Nam Tha and Muong Sing, in-
formed diplomatic sources
said yesterday. The neutralist
leader condemned the rebel
seizure of the two government
outposts in northwestern Laos
as a violation of the year-old
cease-fire, these sources said.
WASHINGTON - The United
States yesterday told the Soviet
Union that this government is ser-
iously concerned with the viola-
tion of the cease-fire in Laos by
Communist-led forces.
The concern was expressed to
Soviet Ambassador Anatoly Dob-
rynin in a 30 minute meeting with
Acting Secretary of State George
W. Ball.
Afterward, the State Depart-
ment announced that Dobrynin
promised he would transmit the
points raised by the United States
to the Soviet foreign office.
Kennedy Comments
Meanwhile, President John F.
Kennedy expressed hope that the
Soviet Union will help restore the
cease-fire in Laos.
At a news conference, Kennedy
said the longer the Laotian situa-
tion exists without a formation of
a national government the more
hazardous the situation becomes.
The royal government regime of
Prince Boun Oum has balked at
compromises the United States be-
lieves that government should
make with the neutrals and rebels.
Disdains Invasion
But sending American troops to
Laos would also be "a hazardous
course." Kennedy said.
And British informants have re-
ported that the Soviet Union and
Poland stymied efforts by the
United States and Britain to pro-
mote an international investiga-
tion of the cease-fire violation.
Jo bless- Rate
Shows, Drop
WASHINGTON () - Employ-
ment soared last month to a rec-
ord high of 67,027,000 for April
and unemployment dipped below
four million for the first time this
year.
Secretary of Labor Arthur J.
Goldberg, announcingthe gains
yesterday, said this is an "encour-
aging sign indeed." He was opti-
mistic the nation would reach
President John F. Kennedys' goal
of not more than four per cent un-
employment by mid-1963.

---------------------- --------

KONRAD ADENAUER
... admonishment?

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GEODETIC:
To Launch
Satellite
CAPE CANAVERAL A) - The
Defense Department lifted a secre-
cy lid yesterday and announced
that it will attempt to launch a
flashing beacon satellite today to
help map the earth more precisely.
Officials said the unusual move
was made to allow the world's sci-
entific community to participate
in the experiment. All foreign na-
tions, including Russia, are invit-
ed to help observe the satellite's
flashes and share their measure-
ments.
The blinking lights will not be
triggered initially until trackers
have had three days to make exact
determination of the satellite's
path.
The announcement was a victory
for a group of United States scien-,
tists who argued before Congress
last month that the ,Defense De-
partment should remove security
wraps from the satellite project.

TON IGHT!.',
House Unamerican Activities Committee
PRO ABOLITION: CON:
BOB ROSS BILL MADDEN
Moderator:
Prof. Norman C. Thomas
9:30 PeM.
Sponsored by:
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World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
CANBERRA-Secretary of State Dean Rusk Tuesday urged Aus-
tralians to adjust to the situation of Britain joining the European
Common Market. "The integration of Western Europe is a develop-
ment of profound historic significance," he added, and would "in our
view strengthen the whole free world."
WASHINGTON-The Agriculture Department yesterday slapped
$554,162 in marketing penalties on troubled Texas financier Billie Sol
Estes for 1961 cotton acreage allotments it says he obtained illegally.
WASHINGTON-President John F. Kennedy said yesterday only
tax evaders would be adversely affected by his proposed tax withhold-
ing on interest and dividends. He said the withholding tax simply
would collect taxes on dividends and interest just as they have been
collected on wages and salaries for years.
* * * *
WASHINGTON-The United States exploded the seventh nuclear
device of its current test series in the mid-Pacific yesterday. The De-
fense Department and Atomic Energy Commission said it was dropped
from an airplane, exploded in the atmosphere and was of intermediate
range in power.

CONCERT in JAZZ
Featuring the Michigan Stage Band
and the BOB JAMES TRIO
Sunday, May 13 at 8 p.m.
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Admission 90c
Tickets on Sale at the Student Administration Building
from 1 to 4 p.m. and at the Door.

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