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May 09, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

tASEBALL SHORTS:
Rank Michigan Among Best;
Ball Players Optioned Out

etters Rack

Up State,

7-

By TOM ROWLAND

By The Associated Press
UCSON.-In a poll by Collegi-
Baseball magazine, the Michi-
. baseball team was ranked 13th
ang college baseball teams.
etaining its first place posi-
i was Arizona which has a 39-
record. In the annual spring
the Michigan baseball team
ed the Arizona squad and lost
queaker, 2-1. Fritz Fisher, jun-
southpaw hurler, took the loss
dazzled X16 batsmen on strike-

(4;

outs with 145 and had a 3.32 earn-
ed run average.
* *
BOSTON--Tracy Stallard, the
man who threw the 61st home run
ball for Roger Maris, was sent back
to, the minors yesterday by the
Boston Red Sox. The 24-year-old
right-handed pitcher was option-
ed to Boston's farm club at Seattle
in the Pacific Coast League.
Stallard, a 6-5, 200-pounder, ap-
peared in 43 games with the Red
Sox last season. He pitched 75 in-
nings in 34 games before he won
or lost, finally dropping a 1-0 game
to Kansas City Aug. 6. At the end
of the season his record was 2-7,
including the 1-0 defeat by the
New York Yankees on Maris' 61st
homer, Oct. 1.
Manager Mike Higgins has used
Stallard only once in the 1962 sea-
son. That was a one-inning relief
job.

the 25-player limit yesterday by
optioning relief pitcher Tex Clev-
enger to Richmond of the Interna-
tional League on 24-hour recall.
Clevenger, a 29-year-old right-
hander, had seen no service' for
the Yanks this season.
Major League
Standings

The weather was a bit cool at
Michigan's varsity tennis- courts
yesterday afternoon but the Wol-
verine netmen weren't.
The defending Big Ten champs
slammed their way to a decisive
7-2 win over Michigan State while
picking up their third conference
victory in six days and tacking on
another digit to an undefeated
spring.
The Wolverines are now unde-
feated in six starts. Yesterday's
loss left Michigan State with a
9-6 season mark.

Michigan's net crew travels to
Notre Dame Thursday and then
returns to take on Ohio State
here on Saturday.
No Foothold
Coach Bill Murphy's netters did
not even allow the Spartans a
foothold in the meet, dropping
only the bottom brackets in the
singles and doubles divisions.
Ray Senkowski eased past Mich-
igan State captain and number
one man Brian Eisner in the in-
itial set, 6-1, and then ran by the
Spartan in the second, 6-3. Ru-
mor has it that one can't smash

* * *
PITTSBURGH--The Pittsburgh
ates optioned lefthand pitcher
e Gibbon to Kinston, N.C., of
Class B Carolina League yes-
day on a 24-hour recall.
-ib&bon, 27, was one of the Pi-
es' top pitchers last season but
s not hurled at all this season
ause of a strained muscle in his
, elbow.,

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York 14 7 .667
Cleveland 13 8 .631
Minnesota 14 11 .560
Los Angeles 11 10 .524
Chicago 13 12 .520
Boston 11 11 .500
Detroit. 10 11 .476
Kansas City 12 14 .462
Baltimore 10 12- .455
Washington 4 16 .200
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston at New York (rain)
Detroit 10, Los Angeles 1
Cleveland 6, Minnesota 3
Chicago at Washington (rain)
Kansas City at Baltimore (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at New York
Cleveland at Minnesota (n)
Detroit at Los Angeles (n)
Kansas City at Baltimore (n)
Chicago at Washington (tn-2)

GB
1
2
3
3
31/
4
412
4%

gibbon was 13-10 with the Pi- * * *
es in his sophomore season last NEW YORK-The New York
r. He led the team in strike- Yankees cut their squad down to
CONCERT in JAZZ
Featuring the Michigan Stage Band
and the BOB JAMES TRIO I

it out with Senkowski, top man
in the Big Ten last year, and
Eisner took heed.
But playing for the long game
from the baseline brought the head
Spartan racketman no greater suc-
cess than it has for the rest of
Senkowski's foes this spring-the
Wolverine star's timing and power-
ful strokes giving him complete
control.
Fauquier Victor
Michigan second man Harry
Fauquier ran into a Spartan that
didn't play exactly to Fauquier
style rules. Squat Dick Colby,
Michigan State sophomore, sticks
to a controlled, backcourt game,
while Fauquier uses his speed for
a quick, aggressive match. The
Wolverine ace used both - and
won, 6-3, 6-2.
Senkowski and Fauquier teamed
up in the first doubles to meet
Eisner and Jack Damson, the
Michigan duo squeaking out a 6-1,
5-7, 6-4 win.
After dropping the second set
the Wolverines stepped out in front
in the third, 3-0. But the Michi-
gan Staters weren't out of it yet.
Two quick Spartan wins, then a
pair of Michigan games, followed
by two more MSU victories set
the score at 5-4, with Senkowski
serving. "Senkowski serving" tells
the story.
Dubie: 6-0, 6-1
Gerry Dubie continued his ap-
parently easy-going winning ways
wit ha coasting 6-0, 6-1 win over
State's Tom Jamieson. And the
fourthman match was more of the
same: Captain Jim Tenney trip-
String Intact
SINGLES: 1. Senkowski (M) def.
Eisner, 6-1, 6-3; 2. Fauquier (M)
def. Colby, 6-3, 6-2; 3. Duble (M)
def. Jamieson, 6-0, 6-1; 4. Tenney
(M) def. Damson, 6-1, 6-1; 5. Beach
(M) def. Lickman, 6-4, 6-4; 6. Wier-
man (MSU) def. Linclau, 6-4, 6-4.
DOUBLES: 1. Senkowski and Fau-
quier (M) def. Eisner and Damson,
6-1, 5-7, 6-4; 2. Tenney and Dubie
(M) def. Colby and Wierman, 6-2,
6-4; 3. Jamieson and Lau (MSU)
def. Beach and Linclau, 6-1, 6-4,

ping Damson, 6-1, 6-1.
Tom Beach took the first set
from Spartan Ron Lickman, 6-4,
and held off a second stanza. rally
to down the upstater by an identi-
cal score.
Ron Linclau lost a tough one
in the sixth-man court. Tom Wier-
man slipped by the Wolverine in
the first set, 6-4, and was on his
way, 3-0 to grabbing the second
when Linclau started banging
away the points.
Linclau came to within 5-4 when

GO-GO BLUE!!:
Lund Adds Spark to 'M'7
Attack with Base Speed

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.

Wierman took the clinching game
for a 6-4 twin win.
Dubie and Tenney piled up a
6-2 victory over Colby and Wier-
man in the second doubles first
set but found rough going in the
second. With the score 5-4, Michi-
gan, the Wolverine pair took ad-
vantage of a Spartan netted smash
return to take the set and match.
Second Blue loss came in the
third doubles, where State's Jamie-
son and Bill Lau downed Beach
and Linclau, 6-1, 6-4.

I

Sunday, May 13 at 8 p.m.
At The Union Ballroom

San Francisco 21 6 .778
St. Louis 15 8 .652
Pittsburgh 14 9 .607
Los Angeles 16 11 .593
Philadelphia 12 10 .545
Cincinnati 12 13 .480
Houston 10 14 .417
Milwaukee 10 14 .417
New York 5 16 .2381
Chicago 6 20 .230
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (rani)
San Francisco 4, St. Louis 3
Philadelphia 6, Cincinnati 4
New York 3, Chicago 1
Los Angeles 9, Houston 6
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at St. Louis (n)
Los Angeles at Houston (n)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (n)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (n)
New York at Chicago

GB
4
5
5
6
8.
92
13
14'/2

I

Adrmission 90c
Tickets on Sale at the Student Administration Building
from 1 to 4 p.m. and at the Door.

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
NUMBER TWO MAN-Harry Fauquier is currently burning up
the Big Ten as the second man on Michigan's tennis team behind
Ray Senkowski. Fauquier, a sophomore, is the former Canadian
junior national champ.

-Daily-Bruce Taylor
POP-UP-Jim Steckley, Michigan left fielder, demonstrates the
pop-up slide as he goes into second against Michigan State. This
type of slide is favored by Coach Don Lund and is the prime rea-
son why Wolverine pilfering has Improved this year.

- -

-I

11

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By MIKE BLOCK
Dick Honig has a new pair of
shoes-but he's keeping them safe
and sound in his locker in Yost
Field House.
He's worn them once-at the
third game the Michigan baseball
team played with Arizona State
this spring. On that day, he struck
out three times and fouled out
once, and what's more, his feet
bothered him.
Oldies But Goodies
So ever since then, he's been
wearing his old pair, and with
phenomenal results. He currently
leads the team with a .344 batting
average, and 21 runs batted in.
However, Honig doesn't credit
his footwear with being the prime
reason for his success. "I've chang-
ed my stance," he said, "and now
the hits are Just dropping in
there." His new stance has ap-
parently made the difference, for
he has raised his average 149
points from last year's .195.
Upswing
Honig's upsurge is part of a
general improvement of the Wol-

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i

verines' hitting of late. They re-
turned from Arizona with a rather
subpar .245 mark, but their lusty
hitting of late, notably the 34
runs they pounded across in the
Michigan State series, has upped
the percentage to .278, And this is
17 points higher than last year's
average, which included Bill Free-
han's .44 6.
Trailing Honig in the Michigan
batting derby is Dennis Spalla,
with .338. Spalla also leads the
team in doubles with six, and is
fourth in RBI with 16. Two other
Wolverines also boast averages
in the .300 range, Harvey Chap-
man with a .302, and Ron Tate
with an even .300.,
Tied Up
Tate is tied for second with
teammate Joe Merullo in the RBI
race with 19. Merullo, despite his
.221 mark, is one of Coach Don
Lund's most dangerous hitters in
the clutch. He leads the team in
home runs with four, and every
one has come in a decisive situa-
tion.
In addition to all of this, that
man Honig is mildly threatening
the Big Ten triple record. His trio
of three-base knocks leaves him
two shy of the mark, and he still
has half a season to better it.
Balanced
Not too surprisingly, the bat-
MOTH ERt
DAY
CARDS FOL
SUNDAY, MAY 13
When you care enough
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ting accomplishments of his stal-
warts have left Coach Lund ex-
tremely pleased. In planning the
season's strategy, he pictured
pitching and defense as the Wol-
verines' strong points. While ac-
complishing these two in fine
fashion, Lund has also emerged
with one of the conference's best
balanced hitting squads. Witness
to this is that there are no less
than seven men on the team with
13 or more RBI.
'That's the best part of our hit-
ting," remarked Lund at a practice
session yesterday. "We get it when
we need it. For example, when we
get a man on third With one out,
and the man sent up to hit a long
fly strikes out, time and again
the following has knocked a hit
to drive in the run after all."
Assume Duties
Whereas last year there was one
big man to drive in a good deal
of the runs, this year the scoring
duties have been assumed by
everyone. "It seems that each man
has been trying to pick up where
Freehan left off," observed Lund.
"Another example of our timely
hitting came in the MSU series,"
he said. "On Friday, when our
pitching slipped a bit and gave
up 13 runs, the boys were more
than equal' to the job. Then, on
Saturday, when the pitchers turn-
ed in two fine performances, the
hitters could relax a little."
High Riding
The team total of 141 RBI
makes for an average of over six
per game. When this statistic is
coupled with the 4.20 staff ERA,
it is not too difficult to see why
the Wolverine baseballers are rid-
ing high atop the Big Ten.'
The team is idle this week until
Friday, when Indiana will visit
Ferry Field for a single bout. Then
on Saturday, Ohio State comes
into twon for one of the season's
most crucial twin bills.

By PETE DiLORENZI
The 1959 White Sox, many base-
ball experts believe, won the Amer-
ican League pennant by a fluke.
Their hitting was poor, their
power practically nonexistent, and
their defense and pitching strong.
However, it is doubtful that they
would have finished as high as
they did had it not been for the
speed on the base paths which
gave rebirth to the old epithet "the
Go-Go Sox."
Michigan baseball Coach Don
Lund does not face the extreme
offensive poverty of the '59 Sox
with his '62 Wolverines, but none-
theless, he has added the Go-Go
ingredient to the team's offensive
fuel and has come up with some
pleasant results.
Go, Go Blue
Lund has decided to make more
use of the "hit and run" type of-
fensive this year for two reasons.
Ass he explained, "We feel that we
have more speed on our club this
season than we did last, and we
also realize that we lack some of
the extra-base power that charac-
terized last year's team. We felt
Batting Averages
BATTING (All Games)

ATTENTION
STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

You Can Win The Following Prizes By
r

Saving

Empty Packages Of:
Tareyton4
DUAOR.4

Honig
Spalla
Chapman
Tate
Jones
Post
Steckley
Campbell
Newman
Merullo
Hood
Lauterbach
Heavenrich
Shirley
Phipps
Neubrecht
Slusher
Kerr
Fisher
Bobel
Roebuck
Dunston
Totals
Slusher
Kerr
Fisher
Roebuck
Bobel
Dunston
Neubrecht
Totals,

G AB R H HR Rbi Pet.
23 93 22 32 0 21 .344
19 65 12 22 1 16 .338
17 53 16 16 0 13 .302
22 90 16 27 1 19 .300
23 9023 25 0 13 .278
718 7 50 1.278
21 79 15 21 1 15 .266
19 65 22 17 1 8 .262
16 43 8 11 1 2 .256
22 77 15 17 4 19 .221
5 14 2 3 0 1 .214
4 7 0 0 0 0 .000
2 2 0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
3 2 1 1 1 1 .500
6 5 4 2 0 2 .400,
7 18 3 5 0 2 .278
8 20'3 5 0 3 .250
4 5 0 1 0 0 .200
8 16 2 2 0 5 .125
3 1' 0 0 0 0.000
23 763 161 212 10 141.278

that it would pay us, then, to.open
up our game and take advantage
of some of the faster boys on the
team."
And he has taken advantage of
them. Going into this weekend's
big home stand against Indiana
and Ohio State, second baseman
Joe Jones has stolen 14 bases, one
more than Michigan's opponents,
have stolen against them all year.
Following Jones are Dave Camp-
bell, the first baseman, with five;
outfielders Jim Steckley and Dave
Post, and third baseman Jim New-
man withafour; and outfielder
'Dennis Spalla and Joe Merullo,
three each. Others have less than
three.
Stop, Thief
Base stealing is far more involv-
ed than running from first to sec-
ond without getting tagged in be-
tween. A base runner must study
the pitcher, decide what type
pitcher he is, determine whether
it is advisable to attempt to steal
on him, and know when and how
to go about it.
Steckley gave an explanation
what a base runner must per-
ceivez "When I see that the steal
is on when I'm on base, I imme-
diately study the pitcher. If he is
a righthander, I take a walking
lead away from the bag, far
enough so that I can get back
safely in case he makes a move.
If he is a lefty, I do the same
thing, only I shorten my lead.
Lefties have the advantage of look-
ing at first and some of them, like
our own Fritz Fisher, have ex-
tremely fast moves to first.
'One Looker'
"I also look to see if he is what
we call a 'one looker,' that is, a
pitcher who looks once at first and
then pitches without ever looking
back. if he is a 'one looker,' I
break as soon as he takes his eyes
off me. If he isn't I have to wait
until I think it is safe to go," he
continued.
Newman added that he watches
the pitcher's shoulders.
After the jump from the base
and the speed, the next thing is
the slide. According to Lund, the
team is taught to go straight in
with what is called a "pop-up"
slide (one leg bent under the oth-
er). "In modern baseball, we dis-
courage fancy hook slides and fall-
away slides unless the runner is
clearly beaten," he said.
The catcher is also important,
although not to the extent of the
pitcher. Steckley explained that
the team watches the catcher in
infield practice to see if he is
either scatter or rifle-armed, but
makes it clear that it is the pitch-
er who is of prime importance.
"Bases are most frequently stolen
off the pitcher; not the catcher,"
he added.

4

PITCHING ,
G W L IP SO
7 2 0 18 7
.7 5 '0 44 20
7 2 4 52 56
8 6 1 48 34
4 0 2 18 4
3 0.1 2.2
23 15 8 120 124

BB ERA-
10 1.50-
17 2.25
37 3.63
28 3.56
13 6.27
8 8.22
13 57.86
126 4.20

F

WIN: 1st PRIZE-Sylvania 19" Portable TV
2nd PRIZE-Emerson Hi-Fi Tape Recorder
3rd PRIZE-Zenith, Royal 500 Transistor Radio
1-l stuent of th nvriyo i gnaeeiilopriiae

oan
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1-=All students of the University of Michigan are eligible to participate.
2-The individual student turning in the most empty Pall Mall; Lucky Strike and/or Dual Filter
Tarreyton packages will be awarded the Sylvania 19" portable TV; student turning in the
second largest number of packages will be awarded the Emerson Hi-Fi tape recorder; student
turning in the third largest number of packages will also be awarded a Zenith, Royal 500
transistor radio.
3-Only Pall Mall, Lucky Strike and Dual Filter Tareyton may be used. They must be tied in
bundles of 25 packages, and each bundle must bear the name and address of the stude'nt
turning them in.
4-Bundles of packages can be turned in at the Union Building Travel Desk on Monday, May 28,
1962. between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Entries turned in later will not be con-

PRIZES :
1st Prize - Webeor-Stereofonic Console Phonograph
2nd Prize - Philco-(FM) Table Radio
WHO WINS:J
1st Prize will be awarded to any group, fraternity, soror-
ity or individual accumulating the highest number of
points.
2nd Prize will be awarded to any group, fraternity, soror-
ity or individual accumulating the-second highest num-
ber of points
~RULES:
1. Contest open to all students.
2. Each empty package submitted on Marlboro, Parlia-
ment or Alpine wil have a value of 5 points. Each
emty package submitted on Philip Morris Regular or
Commander will have a value of 10 points.
3. Closing date, time and location where empty packages
must be turned in will be indicated in your campus
newspaper.
4. Entries will not be accepted after closing time. Empty
packages must be submitted in bundles of 50. Separate
your 5 and 10 point packages.
SAVE YOUR PACKS

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BRAND ROUND-UP
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