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May 02, 1962 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Wx:l,.1NM U)AY, MAY 2, 196?.

Slusher Relieves 'M'

I

I. 'I

Dual Role Suits Scrappy Hood

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Election to the
captaincy of a Michigan athletic
team is an honor few ever receive.
To the qualities of leadership,
sportsmanship, athletic ability and
intangibles that make a Michigan
captain what he is, The Michigan
Daily paysatribute. This is the
eighth of a series.)
By JOHN SCOCHIN
A set of shoulder pads and a
baseball bat have been an integral
part of the life of Eddie Hood,
Michigan's baseball captain, since
he first entered organized athletics
in grade school.
The product of Detroit's Denby
High School currently assumes the
role of centerfielder for the Wol-
verine baseball team in the spring
and dons a football uniform for
work as one of Michigan's top
halfbacks when fall rolls around.
Hood's interest in athletics came
early. By the time he was ten he
was competing in the Detroit

I-M SPOIITLIGIT
By Pete DiLorenzi
PADDLEBALL is a growing sport.
This year, a National Four-Wall Paddleball Tournament, the first
of its kind, was held in Madison, Wis., by the Madison Y.M.C.A. -
a tribute to the sport which Earl N. Riskey, Michigan's current Di-
rector of Intramural Athletics invented some thirty-two years ago.
Riskey, a founder and past president of the National Paddleball
Association ,is ,understandably pleased with his brainchild's increas-
ing popularity and feels that the sport could progress to a point
where there would be regional and national championships and in-
dividual titles. "Such an increase in the sport's scope is possible, but
it would require a lot of work on the part of fans and participants,"
he believes.
Riskey recalls how he invented the game by combining paddle
tennis, a game played with paddles and a net, and handball, which
utilized a wall in place of the net, but which made no use of a paddle.
Deciding to make use of the best features of both, Riskey came up
with ,a game using a tennis ball with the cover removed, heavier
paddles than those used in paddle tennis, and walls instead of a net-
and named it paddleball.
THE GAME spread slowly after its 1930 birth, not reaching adoles-
cence until the war years, when disgruntled servicemen, tired of
the standard I-M diet of handball, leaped at the chance to play the
new game. "They liked it so much," says Riskey,. "that they spread
it wherever they went. Now it's played all over the U.S."
Riskey feels that the reason paddleball is becoming more popular
Is that it is easier to learn than similar games, such as paddle tennis,
handball, and squash. He also feels that although it is played with
handball rules, it most closely resembles squash.
The first campus paddleball tournament was played in 1939 and
the sport has now become a regular I-M event. Riskey estimates
that some 70 teams compete in the program; 30 fraternities, 15 resi-
dence halls, ten independents, ten pro frats, and five faculty teams.
These teams are composed of four men, one and two singles, and a
doubles team. There is also an all-campus singles and doubles tourna-
ment, which is currently being played.
AND JUST to show that his contributions to the game consist not
only in invention, organization, and improvement, Riskey himself,
and his assistant, Rod Grambeau, are taking on Prof. Paul Hunsicker,
Chairman of the Physical Education Program for Men, and Andrew
Kozar, of the Education School and a former All-American gridder
at Tennessee, in the Faculty Finals.
A fitting situation for the father of the sport.
I-M Standings
(Including all but the spring sports)

Department of Parks and Recre-
ation summer league.
By his twelfth birthday he Was
good enough to enter the Babe
Ruth league and remained to star
in the circuit for three years.
Hood's bat was his mainstay. With
a .500-plus batting average he was
named the Most Valuable Player
in the 40-team Detroit Babe Ruth
League in 1956.
American Leagion play was next
in line for Hood. He joined De-
troit's Faust team and starred as
a teammate of Michigan's 1960
baseball captain Bill Roman.
A big change took place the fol-
lowing year when the Michigan
outfielder moved up into Class "D"
ball with the Modern Hard
Chrome team. He was switched
from catcher, where he had played
for seven years, to the outfield. I
New Position
"The outfield seemed to be the
best position for me. Most of the
top catchers are pretty big fellows
and since I'm short I believed I'd
have a better chance in the future
if I switched to the outfield," Eddie'
commented.
"When you start to play it seems
everyone wants to be either a
pitcher, a shortstop or a catcher
because they usually see more ac-
tion and the play centers around
them. I started as a catcher and
once you get started at a position
you just seem to stay there for
the rest of your career," Hood
added.
The summer leagues where a
boy gets to play seven games a
week were the major factor in his
improvement. "In high school a
player practices every day, but he
plays only two games per week.
The 40 or 50 games played during
the short summer are what really
counts," Hood explained.
Takes Time
Now Hood is right at home in
the outfield. "It takes time to learn
all the right moves in a new posi-
tion, more time than people think.
You have to get used to a position
and keep practicing until you know
all there is to know about it," Ed
stated.
While the diminutive captain
was increasing his diamond prow-
ess during the summer, he was also

excelling on the gridiron for Denby
during the school year.
After earning the starting left-
half position in his sophomore
year Hood went on to capture
first team All-City and All-State
honors in 1958. Michigan gridders
John Houtman and Ken Mike were
two of his teammates qn the
"dream team."
As a baseball player who never
hit under .300 in eight years of
organized ball and a prime col-
legiate grid prospect, Hood was
deluged with offers from 55 col-
leges upon graduation from high
school.
The blue chip performer chose
Michiganbecause of its ability to
offer both academic and scholastic
excellence and because of Don
Lund, whom Hood callsethe finest
coach he has ever worked under.
Repeated Injuries
After escaping any serious in-
jury throughout his early playing
days Hood fractured his jaw a few
days after football practice opened
in his sophomore year. When he
came back one month later the
luckless Hood suffered a concus-
sion and pulled ligaments in his
ankle which sidelined him for the
rest of the season.
Last spring Hood was a star on
the baseball squad and spent the
fall months as understudy to All-
Conference halfback Dave Raimey
on the gridiron.
Despite a slow start on the dia-
mond this season Hood has been
a dependable man in the clutch.
Coach Lund commented, "Ed is a
leader. He shows his colors even
when he is not playing well. He's
always hustling and gives a great
boost to team confidence.'"
Coed Tennis
Tourney Set
Michigan's All-Campus Wo-
men's Singles Tennis Tournament
has been set- for this weekend,
May 5-6.
The deadline for entries to be
returned to Office 15, Barbour
Gymnasium is Friday noon.
Play will begin Saturday morn-
ing at 9:30 with the finals sched-
uled for Sunday afternoon on the
Palmer Field Courts.

By JOHN SCOCHIN
While the Michigan baseball
team was sweeping a three game
series over the weekend, Coach
Don Lund has found what many
squads lack, a dependable reliefer.
Wayne Slusher, who possessed
an ERA of 1.47 in 15% innings
and a 1-0 record before the week-
end tour, came in to preserve the
Wolverines' victories in the Iowa
game and the nightcap of the
Minnesota doubleheader.
Against the Hawkeyes, Slusher
came in in the ninth inning with
two runs already score, one man
out and one on. He got the first
man on a sacrifice fly and struck
out the second on three pitches to
give Michigan a 9-6 decision.
Sews Up Sweep
With the Wolyerines holding a
slim one run lead over the Goph-
ers, Slusher relieved Kerr in the
eighth inning and shut out the
20 athletes
Get Awards
Twenty athletes received the an-
nual Fielding H. Yost Award at a
testimonial dinner yesterday even-
ing at the Union for outstanding
excellence in sports and scholastic
achievement.
The awards were awarded by a
commission of five who "select
junior and senior students who
have completed not less than five
semesters of undergraduate work,
who were outstanding for their
moral character and good fellow-
ship, scholastic ability, intellectual
capacity and achievement, physi-
cal ability and vigor, and who
ahowedereal capacitysand .promise
of leadership and success."~
Thomas N. Osterland received
this award for the third year in a
row, while Ergas Leps, Jon B.
Schopf, and William T. Darnton
were second year men.
The others who received the
award were Charles Aquino,
Thomas Beach, Ralph Bromund,
Todd Grant, Jon Hall, Kenneth
Hinnegan, Richard' Honig, and
William Hornbeck.
James Hynds, John Kerr, Gil-
bert Larose, Benjamin McCrae,
Frank Maloney, Steven Overton,
Carter Reese, David Roebuck, and
Robert Spicer also were honored
at the dinner.

Minnesota squad without a hit to
sew up the Wolverine sweep.
"Wayne has a good fastball and
sinker. He is getting the ball
around the plateconsistently
which is the important factor in
his fast start. An especially decep-
tive motion also tends to keep the
batters off-balance and gives him
an added advantage on the
mound," says Coach Lund.
Roebuck won his third game
against Iowa while Fritz Fisher
notched his first win, after two
Tennis Rained-Out
Michigan's scheduled match with
Western Michigan at Kalamazoo
yesterday was rained out and will
not be rescheduled.
The Wolverine netmen host Il-
linois here Friday at 2:15 p.m. and
Indaina here Saturday at 1:30 p.m.
10 losses, in the Minnesota open-
er. Jim Kerr got the credit for the
second Gopher decision to boost
his record to 4-0 to lead the Wol-
verine hurlers.
Rain Halts Streak
A rainstorm and Detroit's Pete
Craig upset the rolling Michigan
winning streak when the Titans
took a 5-1 decision whichtwas
called in only 5%/2 innings. The
home team scored three runs in
the first inning off starter Jim
Bobel and pitcher Craig staved off
the 'M' offense for the rest of the
game to give Detroit its tenth
straight win.
Michigan was handicapped by
the three game series over the
weekend. "As an independent De-
troit was able to save Craig until
they faced us. We have to point
to our conference games first
which are the most important,"
Lund added.
Majfor Lea ue
Standings

i

May 2, 1962 at 4:15 P.M.
3511 S.A.B.

I

Lecture Sponsored by the
Michigan Baha'i World Faith Club

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Through World Law
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New York
Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
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Kansas City
Los Angeles
Boston
Washington

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
11 6 .647
9 6 .600
11 8 .579
9 7 .563
9 8 .529
10 9 .526
9 11 .450
8 9 .471
7 10 .412
3 13 .250

GB
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2
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3
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7Y2

NEXT QUARTERBACK?
Timberlake Eyed by Coaches

RESIDENCE HALLS
1. Gomberg
2. Huber
3. Wenley
4. Winchell
5. Adams
5. Adams
6. Kelsey
7. Michigan
8. Hinsdale
9. Strauss
'10. Taylor
1I. Reeves
12. Scott
13. Hayden
14. Allen-Rumsey
15. Lloyd
16. Williams
17. Van Tyne
18. Anderson
19. Cooley
20. Chicago
21. Greene
SOCIAL FRATERNITY
1. Alpha ,Tau Omega
2. Sigma Alpha Epsilop
3. Beta Theta Pi
4. Sigma Chi
5. Delta Upsilon
6. Sigma Phi Epsilon
7. Phi Delta Theta
8. Phi Gamma Delta
9. Sigma Alpha Nu
10. Theta Xi
11. Delta Tau Delta
12. Phi Kappa Psi
13. Theta Delta Chi
14. Alpha Delta Phi
15. Chi Psi
16. Lambda Chi Alpha
17. Chi Phi
18. Pi Lambda Phi
19. Kappa Sigma
20. Zeta Psi
21. Alpha Epsilon Pi
22. Phi Epsilon Pi
23 Psi Upsilon
24. Phi Sigma Kappa
25. -Zeta Beta Tau
26. Trigon
27. Phi Sigma Delta
28. Theta Chi
29. Phi Kappa Tau
30. Tau Epsilon Phi
31. Tau Delta Phi
32. Delta Sigma Phi
33. Sigma Nu
34. Acacia

1603
1543
1424
1290
1238
1238
1205
1196
1056
1048
1007
982
958
918
906
865'
835
796
793
761
394
,348
1385
1339
1242
1207
1205
1204
1168
1156
1143
1042
994
934
918
869
812
784
756
751
730
721
713
701
680
678
676
674
672
654
642
631
628
600
555
511

35. Tau Kappa Epsilon 507
36. Delta Chi 476
37. Alpha Sigma Phi 457
38. Delta Kappa Epsilon 351
39. Alpha Kappa Lambda 317
40. Phi Kappa Sigma 305
41. Sigma Phi 250
PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITY
1. Delta Sigma Delta 719
2. Psi Omega 654
3. Nu Sigma Nu 645
4. Phi Rho Sigma 590
5. Phi Alpha Kappa 571
6. Phi Chi 565
7. Phi Delta Phi 545
8. Phi Epsilon Kappa 535
9. Lawyers Club 471
10. Alpha Kappa Psi 456
11. Phi Delta Epsilon 415
12. Alpha Chi Sigma 403
13. Falcons 375
14. Tau Epsilon Rho 342
15. Delta Theta Phi 311
16. Gamma Alpha 303
17. Delta Sigma Pi 300
18. Phi Delta ChiP283
19. Alpha Omega 249
20. Eta Kappa Nu 150
21. Alpha Kappa Kappa 45
INDEPENDENTS
1. Evans Scholars 666
2. Nakamura 660
3. Trust 633
4. GOBE 631
5. Foresters 591
6. Sportsmen 468
7. Newman Club 446
8. Actuaries 420
9. Pioneers 344
10. AFIT 292
11. Zips 282
12. Fletcher 275
13. Latvians 255
14. Owen 245
15. C.M.S. 200
16. Animals 130
17. Lansmen 120
18. Rockets 95
19. Lawyers 80
20. Valinquers 75
21. Visigoths 70
21. ASCE 70
23. Tyler-Prescott 60
24. Pool-Sharks 51
25. Crescents 50
26. Chemistry 38
27. Four Freshmen 32
28. Nakamura "B' 26
29. ELI 25

By JIM BERGER,
"Dave Glinka is the best quar-
terback out there this spring,"
said Bob Timberlake, a freshman
who will be trying his best to beat
out Glinka next fall.- 1
Timberlake was impressive as
a runner last weekend in the in-
trasquad scrimmage. "My running
has always been the best thing I
do," said Timberlake, "I was never
much of a passer.-
Apparently running was all he
needed in high school. It was good
enough to make him captain his
junior and senior years at Frank-
lin High School in Franklin, Ohio.
It gave him honorable mention
honors on All-State and All-
American squads his senior year.
Timberlake also played basket-
ball and golf in high school. His
honors in basketball were the same
Rifle Meet
Opens Today
While the I-M softball teams
battle for playoff positions, shoot-
ing for the. Rifle Championship
will begin tonight at 7:30 at the
ROTC rifle range.
The entry fee of a dollar en-
titles the shooter to a rifle, tar-
gets and a box of shells. Each en-
trant will fire 20 shots, 10 each
from the standing and prone posi-
tions.
Three team awards will be made
-one each in the Residence Hall,
Social Fraternity, and Independ-
ent divisions. Individual awards
will go to the top three shooters.
BANJOS
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as those in football.
In the scrimmage Timberlake
displayed his ability .as a runner.,
In nine carries he picked up 801
yds., an average of 8.8 yds. per
carry.
Michigan backfield coach Hank;
Fonde is somewhat impressed with]
this new prospect. "Bob is coming
along well," said Fonde, "but at
this time his running is well
ahead of his passing.
"I rate Timberlake as one of
the better freshmen prospects, but
he's got a lot of competition." I
Learned As' Freshman 1
As for his freshman year last
fall, Timberlake believes it helped
him. "Of course it's difficult to
say how much a freshman year
can help you since you don't have
any real competition, but I think
I learned quite a bit."
When asked how he compared
as a runner to former Michigan
quarterback Bob Ptacek, one of
Michigan's better running quar-
terbacks in the last decade, Fonde
replied, "There are some similari-
ties between the two. Ptacek was
a more compactly built athlete
and I think Ptacek was a more
powerful runner, but Timberlake
is also a powerful runner."
Runner
Timberlake is built like a pow-
erful runner. He stands 6'3" and
weighs 210 lbs.
As for his future chances, Tim-
berlake is modest. "I don't think
I'm one of the top quarterback

candidates out. I have a lot of
good competitionespecially Glinka
who is a real good quarterback in
my estimation."
Besides Glinka there is Frosty
Evashevski, and Bob Chandler
among others, who have shown
promise in the signal calling posi-
tion.
However, Fonde is optimistic
about Timberlake. "I think its
safe to say that he'll see action
next fall."
Notwithstanding Timberlake's
modesty, there should be no doubt
that he can contribute next year
to Michigan's Big Ten chances.
His running ability could make
quite a difference in the Wolver-
ines' attack.
To Compete
National Jr. Trampoline
champion Fred Sanders and
all-around man Gil Larose will
compete in the NAAU gymnas-
tics championships Friday and
Saturday at Seattle.
Coach Newt Loken will fly to
Seattle in order to cover the
meet for the American Broad-
casting Company. The results
and narration will be seen on
television in two weeks.
In last year's meet Tom Os-
terland was winner on Trampo-
line. Sanders is a freshman and
Larose is captain-elect of next
year's gymnastics squad.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 8, Cleveland 6
Minnesota 8, Baltimore 3
New York 6, Chicago 1
Washington 2, Boston 1
Detroit 3, Kansas City 2
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Cleveland (n)
New York at Chicago (n)
Boston at Washington (n)
Baltimore at Minnesota
Detroitat Kansas City (n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wv L Pct. GB
x-San Francisco 15 5 .750 -
St. Louis 12 4 .750 1
x-Pittsburgh 13 5 .722 1
x-Los Angeles 13 8 .619 24
Philadelphia 8 9 .471 5%
Cincinnati 9 11 .450 6
Houston 7 9 .413 6
Milwaukee 8 11 .421 61
New York 3 14 .176 1014
x-Chicago 4 16 .200 11
x-Playing night games on coast
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, inc.
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, ppd.
Cincinnati 8, New York 2
St. Louis 6, Houston 4
Chicago at Los Angeles, inc.
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at San Francisco
Chicago at Los Angeles
Cincinnati at New York
Milwaukee at Philadelphia
Houston at St. Louis
U of M Folklore Society
MEETING
FOLK SING
(everybody come, bring
your instruments)
TOMORROW 8 P.M.
Union, 3rd floor conference
room or Diag,
depending on the weather

You've Never Owned a Lighter
Pair of Golf Shoes Than. These
HUSh P11ppio
breathin' brushed pigskin by Wolverine
1295
Just 13-ounces per shoe for utmost comfort and flexibility.
The smart wedge soles and regulation spikes insure a firm
stance. And, because these shoes are Hell-Cat tanned, they
resist dirt and soil and are water resistant. They always dry
soft-as-new and a brisk brushing restores the leather. Pick
your favorite color in sizes and widths to fit most everybody.
CAMPUS MAS ' SHOP
619 East Liberty NO 2-0266
OPEN MONDAY NIGHTS

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