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February 13, 1962 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY,FEB

The k/inne&~ C~~
By MIKE BURNS
Dis 'n Data
IT HAD TO HAPPEN DEPT. - With the long history of inter-
national player trading across the Canadian and Latin American
borders by U.S. teams, it came as no surprise that the government
finally got into the act. In a straight one-for-one trade we sent Ru-
dolph Abel for Francis Powers (no cash involved). The only question
is: can Powers hit? (Abel was great in left field.)
SUCH STUFF AS DREAMS ARE MADE OF DEPT. - When the
Michigan hockey team ventured north to play Michigan Tech in the
second pair of their WCHA encounters, Coach Al Renfrew was hop-
ing for a split. He got it and Michigan's lead in the conference looked
solid. Then came the Denver collapse and despite the Tech split
(which gave them a 3-1 record over the Huskies) Michigan now rests
in second place. If the wishing had been a little stronger ...
And what's there to the rumor that Renfrew will be rooting for
Tech this weekend, despite the fact that a loss by the Huskies could
send Michigan into first place if the Wolverines can finish their sched-
ule undefeated? The reason for this seemingly illogical position con-
cerns keeping Minnesota out of the playoffs; if the Gophers cop fourth
place, the playoffs will be held at Minneapolis instead of Ann Arbor.
And since the league champion is actually determined by the play-
offs, Michigan's chances for that title would be much better playing
on home ice. (The conduct of Minnesota fans a year ago was one rea-
'on why Michigan refused to schedule the Gophers during the regular
season tis year.)
The complicated league standings show Minnesota present-
ly in fifth place, and if they could take a game with Tech at
Houghton this weekend, they have a good chance of finishing in
fourth place, the last playoff berth. Renfrew may find himself
in the incongruous position of pulling for Tech and Michigan
State and Denver .. . until the playoffs begin and the real crown
Is up for grabs.
THE CASH ALWAYS LOOKS GREENER DEPT. - Plans for a
new fieldhouse and/or multipurpose building to replace long-antiquat-
ed Yost Fieldhouse will probably be postponed for another year. The
athletic department will present its report to the Regents Friday, and
from the mediocre football revenues of 1960 (fiscal 1960-61) there is
little chance that enough will be socked away to pad the construction
itty.
Despite attendance figures rivaled only by Ohio State, which
generally has better gridiron teams, Michigan's hopes for a new
fieldhouse seem extremely dim Skyrocketing costs, an increased
athletic aid plan and stable income have combined to shrink
profits close to the break-even point, relatively speaking.
The Regents have appropriated money to investigate the possibili-
ties of constructing some sort of fieldhouse facilities. The Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Athletics is studying alternatives to raise
the money. The basketball team desperately needs a modern arena;
Coach Dave Strack makes no bones about it. Track Coach Don Can-
ham would like a better place to run indoor meets, as well. And the
hockey team would like to get into the picture, if a multi-purpose
structure is being considered.
Everybody wantsd a new structure. But the biggest hurdle in
the way is the traditional philosophy of the athletic department.
It has always followed an independent policy. Required by Re-
gental bylaw to be self-sustaining economically, the department
has never gone to the state Legislature for funds. Its building pro-
gram, as well as its current operations, through the years has
been financed through athletic revenues. And the department has
repeatedly dismissed the temptation to solicit funds from alumni,
feeling that these, efforts would only draw contributions away from
other segments of the -University.
Thus, the present financial squeeze does not hold promise for a
new fieldhouse in the near future, if the status quo policy is continued.
The athletic department's report, hopefully, may give some indication
of new alternatives to the dilemma. If the building program is to ex-
pand, there cannot help but be a digression from the policy of the
past; in other words, a less independent path. In many ways this is
regrettable, but it is the only realistic means of meeting an even more
serious problem.
EXOTIC NAVAL VESSELS
f..created by "BuShips" Engineero
The gigantic carriers, long range nuclear submarines and
missile-firing cruisers we hear so much about these days rep-
resent just the beginning of a new Navy in the making.
Naval scientists and engineers, traditionally limited to de-
signing vessels that travel on or very near the surface, are
now concerned with complex scientific and military systems
that operate miles up into Outer Space, miles down ato
Inner Space ... as well as on, under or over the surface.
This new Navy in the making of-
fers unparalleled opportunities for

the young engineer who wants to
increase his professional stature
.. . to move ahead to advanced
degrees ... to participate in many of the most important
technological developments of the future.
Immediate openings exist at the Navy's Bureau of Ships
headquarters in Washington for the following:
1 GRADUATES in NAVAL ARCHITECTURE and
MARINE ENGINEERING . . . ELECTRICAL/
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING.., and MECHANI-
CAL ENGINEERING to accept permanent positions
in Systems Design or Equipment Development.
2 STUDENTS in these same engineering areas who have
completed their Sophomore or Junior years to take
on interesting and ,well-paid summer assignments.
3 AERONAUTICAL ENGINEER for a SPECIAL"
POSITION doing Preliminary Design work on HY-
DROFOIL and HYDROSKIMMER CRAFT. This is
a most unusual opportunity for the right man to gain
special experience in this far-ranging new field ... ex-
perience unavailable anywhere else.
All permanent positions include the advantages of Career
Civil Service . . . liberal vacations and sick leave; wholly-
or partly-supported post-graduate education, participating
Health, Retirement and Life Insurance Plans.

for

turn

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WASHINGTON, D.C.-FEB.16,17

A JOINT COOPERATIVE EFFORT
BY NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
CONCERNED WITH ACHIEVING
A JUST PEACE AND PRESERVING
DEMOCRATIC VALUES

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So stark is the prospect of war and so immediate is the danger of it, that we call upon
students on this campus to join us in Washington, D.C. on February 16-17 to confront our
government and to urge that our nation take the lead in. a turn toward peace.

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THE PROBLEM.
We wish to meet squarely the danger presented to democratic values by Soviet
ideology and Communist expansionism. But the essentially military response of
the United States to the Soviet challenge has been inadequate, self-defeating, and
profoundly dangerous.
It has been inadequate to insure the welfare and freedom of the impoverished
nations of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
It has been self-defeating because the dynamic of the arms race tends to erode
freedom within our own nation and, in the name of freedom, to ally us with
totalitarian regimes overseas. The failure of our essentially military foreign policy
has led to fear and frustration and to that intolerance of dissent and discussion
which now threatens the foundations of our democracy.
Finally, our present foreign policy is incredibly dangerous because it has led
to a spiral of weapons development. Our present "security" under a deterrent
policy rests entirely upon a balance of terror. A human or mechanical accident, a
political miscalculation, the spread of nuclear weapons to nations now without
them-these are the factors which virtually insure the eventual outbreak of a full.
scale nuclear war which would not only end the present tenuous peace, but would
also destroy those freedoms to which we are deeply committed.
How can we maintain ourselves in the same world with the Soviet Union and
at the same time maintain the peace? We must build on the basic interest in
preventing nuclear war which is common to both sides. The validity of our
approach does not depend on an optimistic view of Soviet intentions, or an
approving view of Soviet society. It is based on a realistic appraisal of the Soviet
interest in survival.
PEACE IS OUR DEFENSE
It is difficult to turn toward peace as long as we are deluded as to the real
nature of war. Rather than encouraging a massive and essentially useless program
of civil defense, the government should frankly inform the public that if nuclear
war comes there is no practical method of defending the population except in
isolated rural areas, and the government should take into consideration the fact
that as measures of civil defense increase, so also would the level of attack against
us increase. We believe civil defense prepares the population psychologically for
war without in any way preparing the population to survive such a war.
NO TESTING
We urge the United States to refrain from atmospheric testing. The United
States has gained new prestige among the people of the world for its restraint thus
far. To resume testing now would not only lose us this respect, but would remove
all limitations from the arms race. This, and the danger to present and future
generations from radioactive fallout, far outweigh the minimal military advan-
tages which might be gained from testing in the atmosphere. Now is the time for
this country to proclaim that it will, not resume testing in the atmosphere, and to
call on the Soviet Union for reciprocal action.
TOWARD AMERICAN
IN ITIATIVES
The proclaimed goal of both the United States and the Soviet Union is a
disarmed world under law by negotiated agreement. Yet both major powers are
now pursuing a policy of peace through nuclear terror. Because this policy will
almost certainly fail in the long run, and in the short run has already made negoti-
ations impossible, we therefore call upon the Congress and the Administration to
take the initiative in breaking the deadly cycle of the arms race. It is our belief that'
if certain initiatives are taken, they will help to lessen the tensions on both sides
and open the door to serious negotiations. Among the initiatives we urge are the
following:
(1) We urge the government of the United States to announce that it
will not resume atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, and that it will invite
the U.N. to establish within our territory a test-monitoring system to prove to
the world our good faith and as a precedent toward a universal, controlled,

and inspected test ban agreement. Then, having taken this step, the United',
States should call upon the Soviet Union, Great Britain, and France to follow
our example and to permit the U.N. to set up such test monitoring systems
within their national borders.
(2) We urge the government not to provide nuclear weapons to those
powers not presently in possession of them and to seek United Nations inspec.
tion of nuclear reactors in those nations which do not yet have nuclear weap-
ons, to insure that such reactors are being used only for peaceful purposes.
(3) We urgethe government to withdraw its missile bases in areas such
as Turkey and Italy where their vulnerability to attack makes them useless
except for the purpose of a first strike against the Soviet Union. Such initiative
on our part should be followed by a request that the Soviet Union make simi-
lar withdrawals.
(4) We urge the government to seek disengagement in Central Europe,
both as a genuine resolution of the Berlin crisis, and as a basis for further
negotiations towards disarmament.
(5) We urge the government to commit itself fully to the struggle
against poverty, hunger and disease throughout the world. This massive
economic aid should be channeled through the United Nations both in order
to take economic aid out of the context of the Cold War and also to strengthen
the United Nations. Having taken this initiative we should then call upon the
Soviet Union to join us in channeling its economic aid through the United
Nations.
We know that disarmament is a long and difficult task. It is easy to use the
actions of the-Soviet Bloc to excuse actions of our own. And yet no matter how
difficult the task of disarmament, that task must be undertaken now. Rather than
trying to match every dangerous or foolish action of the Sovie Bloc it is time for us
to initiate action for peace. We demand an end to this armaments race which leads
us toward a world in which, whether in war or peace, none of us will want to live;
we demand that our government cease to follow the Soviet Union in the arms race,
but that instead we lead it in a' peace race, and thus renew the long and nobler
struggle-now almost forgotten-for peace and freedom for all men.
DETAILS OF THE PROJECT
- Starting at 10 a.m. Friday, February 16, students will picket the White House
and other government buildings, handing out a condensation of the primary policy
statement, while delegations of students well-versed in the adopted position of the
project, will visit individually the Senators and Representatives in Congress.
Students will sleep in Washington that evening and the next day, February 17,
picketing will continue, combined with visits to administration officials, civic leaders
in Washington and special delegations going to every foreign embassy in Wash-
ington. Late in the morning the thousand or more students, both those who had
arrived on Friday and those arriving on Saturday morning, will march through
the city to the White House for a demonstration. In the late afternoon there will
be a major rally with key speakers, including Eleanor Roosevelt, Norman.Thomas,
Emil Mazey, and Leo Szilard.
WHAT CAN YOU DO ?
1. JOIN THE MICHIGAN DELEGATION
For Details, Call: NO 5-5466
NO 5-7222
2. Send a letter to the President and your Congressman support-
ing the project initiatives.
3. Read about foreign policy and peace (reading lists are avail-
able).

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COMING EVENTS
Mr. John J. Nachtsheim, Chief Naval Architect
and one of the leading authorities on marine de-
sign, will address the Quarterdeck Society tomor-
row evening, Wednesday, February 14th at 7:30
P.M. in Room 448-D, West Engineering Building.
All iaterested persons are invited to attend.
The large-scale, lighted cutaway model of a PO-
LARIS SUBMARINE will be on view in the en-
trance of the West Engineering Building Thurzday
through Monday, February 15th-19th.
On Monday, February ,19th, Arthur J. Lynch,

4. Sign the project petitions.
5. Wear a white armband on Feb. 16 and 17.

INITIATE THE RACE for PEACE

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